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:^EYNOLDG HISTORICAL 
GENEALOGY COLLECTION 



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12210510 



A STANDARD HISTORY 

OF 

THE HANGING ROCK 

IRON REGION 

OF OHIO 

An Authentic Narrative of the Past, with an Extended 
Survey of the Industrial and Commercial Development 



Eugene B. Willard, Ironton 

General Supervising Editor 

Hon. Daniel W. Williams George O. Newman 

Editor (or Jackson County Editor for Scioto County 

Charles B. Taylor 

Editor for Vinton County 

Assisted by a Board of Advisory Editors 



VOLUME II 



ILLUSTRATED 



PUBLISHERS 
THE LEWIS PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1916 



The reproduction of this book has been made possible through 
the sponsorship of The Scioto County Chapter of Ohio 
Genealogical Society, Portsmouth, Ohio. 



AlUEM COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 

FORT WAYNE, INDIANA 



Printed in U.S.A. by 

Walsworth 
Marceline, MO. 

regional director: 

DON MILLS, INC. 

Salem, WV 26426 
(304) 782-1179 



zzimio 




UOHN M-WIL.LIAMS 



Hanging Rock Iron Region 



John M. Williams. Every community is frequently reminded of 
the fact that "in the midst of life we are in death." A poignant illus- 
tration of this was brought to Portsmouth May 25, 1915, when a few 
hours after he was struck and fatally injured by a street car within a 
short distance of his home, John M. Williams passed away. As was well 
stated at the time his activity in business, religious, fraternal and politi- 
cal circles earned him a prominence and high regard in the community 
that few men attain. 

In the steady pursuit of one line of business through many years 
and by useful and disinterested service in various public offices, he had 
long been one of Portsmouth's best known and most esteemed citizens. 
From an humble beginning he rose hy his own efforts to a position of com- 
manding influence. His own family has many prominent associations 
with the Hanging Rock Iron Region, while his wife is a member of the 
Barber family, whose residence and activities identify it with the earliest 
times in Southern Ohio. 

The late John M. Williams was born at Martins Ferry, Ohio, F3l)vu- 
ary 6, 1847, a son of Samuel A. and Harriet (Houston) Williams. On 
another page will be found a sketch of the late Samuel A. Williams. 

When a boy John M. Williams had regular attendance at the local 
public schools, and the first break in the quiet routine of existence was 
at the age of eighteen when he enlisted in Company I of the One Hundred 
and Eighty-ninth Regiment of Ohio Infantry. The war was then in its 
final period. He joined his command at Columbus, was sent south into 
Alabama, and continued in service until honorably discharged Septem- 
ber 28, 1865. The young soldier returned home and for a time was 
steamboating on the Ohio River and then was an employe in the rolling 
mill. August 25, 1869, began his apprenticeship at the carpenter's trade 
under Robert Baker, at that time one of Portsmouth's leading con- 
tractors and builders. After getting his standing as a master carpenter 
he continued in the business with an exceptional regularity, and has 

645 



646 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

been one of the best carpenters and builders in this section, his active 
work as a contractor and builder covering a period of forty-five years. 
In 1880 he engaged in partnership with Thomas Johnson in the contract- 
ing business and the two remained together for several years. Later 
Mr. Williams acquired an interest in the Smith Lumber Company, but 
sold out in 1903 and with W. A. Miller formed the Williams-Miller Lum- 
ber Company. Two years later he became sole owner and founded the 
Williams Lumber Company, which was located on the Gallia Pike just 
east of Young Street. This business he successfully operated until 1912. 

In politics Mr. Williams was a stanch republican, and was repeatedly 
urged by his friends to become a candidate for republican nomination 
as mayor, but never allowed his name to go before the primaries. Per- 
haps his best public service was as director of the public service at Ports- 
mouth, a position to which he was appointed by Mayor Tynes in 1912. 
lie filled that office until January, 1914, and retired with an enviable 
record for honesty and efficiency. 

His position among the contractors of the city was well illustrated 
by the fact that at the time of his death he was president of the Con- 
tractors' Association of Portsmouth, and he was also a director in the 
Portsmouth Savings & Loan Company. Many scores of buildings in 
and around Portsmouth attest his skill as a contractor and in later years 
he had the valuable assistance of his sons Samuel and Roy in managing 
the business. He was still in the harness as a contractor at the time of 
his death. 

It should also be noted as a part of his public record that he served 
as chief of the fire department of Portsmouth from 1888 to 1892, ^nd was 
a trustee of the city waterworks from 1894 to 1897. During the admin- 
istration of Governor McKinley he was deputy inspector of workshops 
and factories. His high position in the city was given a testimonial 
after his death when the various city offices were closed during the 
funeral services and there came from men of all classes tributes of respect 
and honor to a life which had been led with such signal usefulness. He 
also kept up associations with army comrades through Bailey Post No. 
164, Grand Army of the Republic, and was affiliated with Aurora 
Lodge No. 48, Free and Accepted Masons, and with Massie Lodge No. 
115 of the Knights of Pythias. Only a short time before his death 
Massie Lodge presented him with a gold medal in recognition of his 
twenty-five years of active membership. He was a devout member 
of the Second Presbyterian Church, and gave freely of his money 
and energy to its upbuilding and welfare, and was a member of the 
Good Fellowship Sunday-school class of that church. His enterprise and 
ability were always matched by a generosity, and one notable instance 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 647 

of this was the service he rendered in rebuilding the church of a 
colored congregation in the city after the flood of 1913. 

On October 22, 1872, Mr. Williams married Alice Dean Barber, and 
for more than forty years they traveled life's highway together. She 
was born in Portsmouth, a daughter of Uriah Barber, a native of Scioto 
County. Her grandfather was Samuel Barber, born in Pennsylvania 
July 5, 1787. Her great-grandfather was Major Uriah Barber, who was 
born in Northumberland County, Pennsylvania, in 1761, and in April, 
1778, enlisted with the colonial troops for three months. That was the 
darkest period of the Revolution. He was in Captain Champlin's com- 
pany and Colonel Hosterman's regiment. Again in the same year he 
enlisted, this time for eight months, and in Captain Morrow's company 
and Colonel Hartley's regiment. Following that came six months with 
Colonel Hunter's regiment, and later in 1779 he enlisted for six months 
in Captain Grove's company of Colonel Hunter's regiment. His name 
is found in the official records of these organizations, which showed 
strong fighting ability in winning independence. Many years after the 
war, when past the age of seventy, he applied for a pension on September 
30, 1832, and the request was readily granted. 

In the meantime Major Barber had become one of the pioneers of 
the Northwest Territory. In the summer of 1796 he landed at the mouth 
of the Little Scioto River, proceeded to Old Town, lived in that neigh- 
borhood until 1803, and then came to Portsmouth. What the country 
was like at that time must be left to the more general account found 
on other pages. Mr. Massie having given him a lot, Major Barber 
erected a two-story hewed log house, and opened it as a public inn, the 
first hotel in Portsmouth's recorded history. He also became quite 
prominent in public affairs. With the prestige of a Revolutionary soldier, 
he served acceptably as a major of the state militia, and was also trustee 
of Wayne Township and tilled several terms the office of county coroner. 
His death occurred June 26, 1846, at the age of eighty-five. His burial 
was with military honors. Col. Peter Kinney, then captain of the 
local militia, headed his company in the military ceremony. IMajor 
Barber married for his first wife Barbara Clingman, daughter of John 
Michael Clingman, and she was the direct ancestor of Mrs. Williams. 

Samuel Barber, grandfather of Mrs. AVilliams, was a boy when his 
father came to Ohio, and here he learned the trade of shoemaker. At 
that time all footwear was made by hand and by custom order, and many 
shoemakers journeyed about the country devoting a day or more to the 
requirements of each family. He did his work well and lived at Ports- 
aiouth until his death. His remains now rest in Greenlawn Cemetery. 
He married Violet Swords, who survived him several years. Uriah 



648 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Barber, father of Mrs. Williams, when a boy was apprenticed to his 
uncle, Samuel Swords, to learn the trade of plasterer, and eventually 
became a successful contractor in that line and followed it the rest of 
his active career. He died at the age of fifty-six. His widow Rachel 
lived on to the advanced age of ninety-three. Both were members of 
the Methodist Protestant Church. They reared seven children: John, 
Mary, Jim, Alice, William, Kate and Lucy. 

Mr. and iMrs. Williams had a fine family of five children named 
Kate, Samuel A., Alice D., John and Royal A. Kate's first husband 
was George Wood, an engineer who lost his life in a railway accident, 
and she is now the wife of Ho\V'ard N. Francis of Adler, Washington, 
and has a daughter Lois Miriam by her first husband. Samuel A., who 
is now connected with the River City Lumber Company of Portsmouth, 
has a military record, having enlisted April 24, 1898, three days after the 
declaration of war on Spain, in Company H of the Fourth Regiment of 
Ohio Infantry, went with his command to Porto Rico and served until 
honorably discharged on January 21, 1899. By his marriage to Merle 
Black, Samuel A. has a son named John M. The daughter Alice is the 
wife of Lloyd J. Moorhead of Portsmouth. The son John lost his life 
in a railway accident at the age of fifteen. Royal A. married Mary 
Derinan and has a daughter named Alice D. 

John F. Ketter. This publication exercises one of its important 
functions when it enters specific record concerning those sterling and 
progressive citizens who are representative figures in connection with 
the various lines of industrial and commercial enterprise in the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region, and such a one is Mr. Ketter, who is president and 
manager of the Ketter Buggy Company, which marks one of the impor- 
tant and substantial business enterprises in the city of Tronton. 

Mr. Ketter was born at Jackson Furnace, Scioto County, Ohio, on 
the 26th of April, 1849, a date that indicates that his is the distinction 
of being a scion of a pioneer family of this favored section of the Buckeye 
State. He is a son of Henry E. and Mary (Marting) Ketter, both natives 
of the great Empire of Germany, where the former was born in 1828, and 
the latter in 1824. Henry E. Ketter was reared and educated in his na- 
tive land, where he learned the trades of brick and stone mason, ;\nd he 
immigrated to America in 1854, when a young man of about twenty-six 
years. He became actively identified with the iron industry in the Hang- 
ing Rock Region of Ohio in the pioneer days, assisted in the installing of 
many furnaces and was otherwise prominent as a skilled workman at bis 
trade and in other meclianical lines. He continued to reside in Scioto 
•County until his death, in 1881, and survived by thirty years the wife of 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 649 

his youth, she having passed away in 1851. Of their four children, the 
eldest is William, who is a resident of Columbus, Ohio ; Mary is the wife 
of Frederick Graham, of Ironton; John F., of this review, was the next 
in order of birth ; and Henry, who married Miss Maria Slmmway, is em- 
ployed as an expert blacksmith in the plant of the Ironton Portland 
Cement Company. 

John F. Ketter attended the common schools of Scioto County until 
he was sixteen years of age, and he then entered upon a virtual appren- 
ticeship to learn the carriage and buggy business, by entering the employ 
of Henry Lively, of South Webster, Scioto County. The contract made 
between them provided that the young employe should provide for his 
own clothing aJid should receive for his services forty dollars and board 
for the first year, fifty for the second, and sixty for the third. At the 
expiration of his contract agreement ]\Ir. Ketter went to the city of 
Portsmouth, where he worked as a journeyman at the carriage-maker's 
trade, until he had attained to his legal majority. Upon reaching the dig- 
nified position thus granting him the right of franchise he gave evidence 
of his independence, ambition and self-reliance by- initiating business on 
his own responsibility. He established a modest shop and through the 
efficiency of his work and the fairness of his methods his trade grew 
apace, with incidental augmenting of his prosperity in financial lines. 
The major part of his independent business career has had Ironton as its 
stage, and there, in 1902, he expanded the scope and importance of his 
business by organizing the Ketter Buggy Company, which is incorporated 
with a capital stock of $25,000, and of which he has been president and 
manager from its inception, his technical ability and careful administra- 
tive policies having been the prime forces in making the enterprise a 
substantial success. Dr. Clark Lowry is vice-president of the company, 
and John W. Ketter, son of the founder, is secretary and treasurer. 

Mr. Ketter has shown himself most loyal and public-spirited as a citi- 
zen and business man, is a stalwart supporter of the cause of the repub- 
lican party, served one terra as a member of the city council of Ironton, 
is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, and both he and his 
wife are zealous members of the First Methodist Episcopal Church in 
their home city. In addition to other realty in Ironton, Mr. Ketter is the 
owner of his fine residence property at 431 South Sixth Street. 

On the 27th of February, 1870, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Ketter to Miss Emma Frouein, daughter of the late Frederick Frouein, 
a prosperous farmer of Scioto County. Of the five children of this ideal 
union the eldest is John W^., who is secretary and treasurer of the Ketter 
Buggy Company ; Frederick M., who is superintendent in the factory of 
the same company, married Flora Crura, and they have one child ; Henry, 



650 HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 

who is a carriage trimmer by trade and vocation, and who no-w resides 
in the City of San Francisco, California, married Miss Blanche Rowe; 
Miss Nora holds the position of stenographer in the office of the Hetter 
Buggy Company; and Minnie is a student in the Ironton public schools. 

Elias Nigh. Born and reared in Ohio and a scion of one of the lion- 
ored pioneer families of this favored commonwealth, it was given to 
Colonel Nigh to confer distinction upon his native state, which shall ever 
owe to his memory a debt of special honor. As a lawyer, soldier and 
legislator he wielded large and benignant influence, and his life was 
guided and governed by the loftiest principles of integrity, the while he 
had a deep sense of personal responsibility and so ordered his life as to 
make it a veritable beatitude. Colonel Nigh died at his home in Ironton, 
Lawrence County, on the 24th of February, 1899, and his memory is re- 
vered by all who came within the compass of his strong and noble in- 
fluence, so that this publication would impair its consistency were there 
failure to enter a proper memorial tribute. 

Colonel Nigh was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, on the 16th of Feb- 
ruary, 1815, and thus his death occurred about one week after he had 
celebrated the eighty-fourth anniversarj' of his birth. His father, Samuel 
Nigh, was a native of Maryland and came to Fairfield County, Ohio, in 
1802, before the admission of the state to the Union. This worthy pioneer 
lived up to the full tension of responsibilities and vicissitudes incidental 
to the formative period of Ohio history, was influential in his community, 
and passed the closing period of his life in Wyandotte County, where he 
died in 1877, at the age of eighty-three years. From a previously pub- 
lished memoir are taken, with slight paraphrase, the following statements 
concerning Colonel Nigh: 

"As a youth he was employed in business by General Reese, brother-in- 
law of Senator Sherman, and he passed several years in the home of ^Irs. 
Sherman after the death of her distinguished husband. While thus en- 
gaged he diligently employed his time in reading and study. For two 
years after attaining to his legal majority Colonel Nigh was engaged in 
business for himself, and he then began the study of law under the pre- 
ceptorship of Hon. Hocking H. Hunter, of Lancaster, the judicial center 
of Fairfield County. In the same county he pursued also a classical 
course in Greenfield Academy, an institution conducted by Professor 
John Williams, a very accomplished scholar. In the spring of 1843 
Colonel Nigh was admitted to the Ohio bar, at Lebanon, Warren County, 
and in the autumn of this year he located at Burlington, Lawrence 
County, whence, in 1852, he removed to Ironton, the county seat. He 
was made colonel in the State militia ; he was thrice elected representative 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 651 

in the Ohio legislature— in 1847, 1859, and 1876. In 1877, as chairman 
of the standing committee on mines and mining, he introduced a bill to 
establish a chair of mining and mining engineering in the Ohio Agricul- 
tural College ; also a bill to consolidate land titles in Ohio. He also pre- 
pared, and presented in the house, joint resolutions for the amendment of 
the state constitution in such manner as to make provision for the organ- 
ization of its judiciary. 

"In 1861, at the inception of the Civil war. Colonel Nigh was ten- 
dered the rank of major in the First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and also 
that of assistant quartermaster of volunteers with the rank of captain. 
He accepted the latter overture and received his commission in August, 
1861, with assignment to General Thomas' division, at Camp Dick Robin- 
son, Kentucky. In the spring of 1862 he was placed on the staff of 
General Buell, as the chief quartermaster of the Army of the Ohio, and 
remained until General Buell was relieved from the command, in the 
following autumn. He was then assigned to duty as depot quartermaster 
at Louisville, Kentucky, and about this time he was tendered to office 
of colonel of a new Ohio regiment. He forwarded his resignation as 
quartermaster, but the government recognized the value of his services in 
the latter capacity and refused to accept his resignation, with the result 
that he was soon afterward made chief quartermaster of the Sixteenth 
Army Corps, with the rank of lieutenant colonel. 

"In April, 1863, as a further reward for his meritorious services. 
Colonel Nigh was commissioned assistant quartermaster in the regular 
army, with the rank of captain. In June, 1864, he was given the addi- 
tional duty of acting as disbursing officer of the entire Mississippi valley, 
from Cairo to Natchez. Early in the following month, after having ren- 
dered very valuable and distinguished service to his country, Colonel 
Nigh resigned his office." 

Testimonials of appreciation of his services as quartermaster were 
given in many letters from official and representative sources, and there 
can be no impropriety in perpetuating in this review certain extracts 
from some of these letters. Lieut. Col. J. D. Bingham, chief quarter- 
master of the Department of the Tennessee, under date of June 
13, 1864, wrote to Colonel Nigh, relative to the latter 's retirement from 
the post of chief quartermaster of the Sixteenth Army Corps, in the fol- 
lowing words: "I regret exceedingly that you are compelled to resign. 
You have rendered me such valuable assistance and performed your 
duties in such a satisfactory manner that I fear your place can not be 
filled in this department." 

Gen. S. A. Hurlbut, major general of volunteers, wrote as follows: 
"Dear Colonel: I can not permit you to go off the military stage with- 



652 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

out some testimonial from me of my appreciation of your qualities as a 
man and an oflBcer. I have no hesitation in saying that your duties as a 
chief quartermaster of the corps were discharged with a punctual fidelity 
and intelligent foresight and integrity that I have never known equalled. 
You retire, my dear Colonel, with unblemished honor, with the highest 
reputation for efficiency and integrity, and with the most complete con- 
dence and regard from 3'our commanding general." 

In his final settlement with the government, Colonel Nigh's accounts 
footed up more than six million dollars. 

On the 1st of July, 1862, to meet a special exigency, Colonel Nigh 
ordered a detail of thirty negroes to be enrolled from among the camp 
followers to man a supply train, the detail of Union soldiers previously 
ordered for that purpose arriving too late for the train. This was the 
first instance in which negroes were similarly employed, and Colonel 
Nigh thus had the distinction of being the man who introduced negro 
labor into the Union service. This example was immediately followed by 
other officers, the innovation being made known to and approved by 
the government authorities at Washington. Soon large bodies of negroes 
were actively engaged in doing much of post and other labor which had 
tlieretofore been performed by details from the volunteer Union ranks. 

For several years Colonel Nigh served as a member of the Ironton 
City Council, being called to the presidency of this municipal body, and 
also having been chairman of the committee on the construction of the 
Ironton waterworks. Further evidence of his strong hold upon popular 
confidence and esteem in his home city was shown in his election to the 
office of mayor of Ironton. 

In 1869 Colonel Nigh was appointed assessor of internal revenue for 
the Eleventh Ohio district, and he retained this position until the office 
was abolished, in 1872. All the positions which Colonel Nigh was thus 
called upon to fill were conferred upon him entirely without his seeking. 
Shortly after the close of the war he organized the Sheridan Coal Com- 
pany of which he was president. After the war he brought from the 
South a number of those pitiable and helpless waifs of humanity, the 
negroes who had been slaves and had been made homeless and desolate 
by the Emancipation Proclamation, — a class thus suddenly compelled 
to depend on their own resources, while previously they had been 
care-free and without responsibility. Colonel Nigh brought them to 
Ironton, Ohio, helped them to find homes in a quarter of the town 
set apart for their exclusive use, and he became at once their guide 
and counselor, with the result that he became deeply loved and revered 
by them. 

During the flood of 1884 Colonel Nigh devoted all his time and ener- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 653 

gies to- the alleviation of suffering and the saving of property through- 
out the devastated district. In this connection he collected through 
personal effort large sums of money for the benefit of the sufferers. 

In politics, it is scarcely necessary to state, Colonel Nigh was a stal- 
wart republican, and in a fraternal way he manifested his deep and 
abiding interests in his old comrades of the Civil war by retaining 
affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic. Of him the follow- 
ing consistent estimate has been Avritten : "A leader in all good 
public works, a lawyer of marked ability, he was privately modest, 
retiring and unostentatious. The fundamental principles of his 
religion were honesty, uprightness and absolute justice, with charity 
to all men. I know of no more fitting words with which to close a 
brief sketch of this honorable. Christian life than those used by his life- 
long friend and admirer, General Sherman, in a toast made to Colonel 
Nigh during a meeting of the Army of the Cumberland, at Washington, 
some years ago: 'A man who devoted four years of his life to his 
country in its greatest need, and saved for it millions of dollars; 
who may not leave to his children great wealth, but will leave to 
them that which is a far more precious inheritance, an absolutely 
honest name.' " 

On the 5th of March, 1848, was solemnized the marriage of Colonel 
Nigh to Miss Alice Henshaw, of Lawrence County, who survived him 
by several years. They became the parents af eight children : Reese, 
Samuel Henshaw, Jennie, Julia, Mary, Elizabeth W., Alice Henshaw, 
and William Henshaw. Reese is deceased, as are also Jennie and Julia, 
the latter of Avhom was the wife of Charles B. Taylor. Mary is the 
wife of E. Stanley Lee, and Alice H. is the wife of John Henry 
Queal. Samuel H. and William H. are associated in the conducting 
of an important lumbering business in Ironton and in the State of 
Kentucky, as will be noted by referring to the sketch of the career 
of William 11. Nigh, on other pages of this work. 

William H. Nicai. On preceding pages of this publication is entered 
a memoir to the late and distinguished Col. Elias Nigh, whose name 
is held in enduring honor in his native State of Ohio, and whose noble 
achievements are briefly noted in the circumscribed tribute possible of 
incorporation in a work of this order. The son William IT. is known 
as one of the representative business men of his native City of Ironton, 
where he iff well upholding the prestige of the family name, but in 
the article here presented it is unnecessary to repeat the data that 
are given in the memoir of liis honored father, as ready reference 
may be made to the article mentioned. 



654 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

William Henshaw Nigh, secretary and treasurer of the Nigh Lum- 
ber Company, of Ironton, is thus identified with one of the important 
industrial enterprises contributing to the commercial prestige of his 
native city, and the president of the company is his elder brother, 
Samuel H., the two owning and controlling the business, in which they 
own equal shares and which has been by them developed to large pro- 
portions. William H. Nigh was born in Ironton on the 8th of Novem- 
ber, 1868, and continued his studies in the public schools of the city 
from an early age until he had completed the curriculum of the high 
school. At the age. of eighteen j'ears he became associated with his 
brother Samuel H., who was engaged in the buying and shipping of 
lumber, with headquarters at Ironton. At the end of one year William 
H., then nineteen years old, was sent by his brother to Mississippi to 
assume the management of a saw mill owned by the latter on the Yazoo 
River. William H. passed about three years in the supervision of the 
business in Mississippi and then, in 1890, he became associated with 
his brother in the purchase of a portable saw mill at Catlettsburg, 
Boyd County, Kentucky. This mill they continued to operate suc- 
cessfully in that part of the Bluegrass State for four years, and they 
still have large lumber interests in Kentucky. ^Ir. Nigh returned to 
Ironton, the two brothers here erected their present saw mill, at the 
foot of Ellison Street, in January, 1890, and having placed the same in 
operation in addition to their lumbering activities in Kentucky. The 
mill has been kept up to the highest standard and has the capacity for 
the output of 50,000 feet of lumber a day. Through progressive methods 
and definite circumspection the enterprise has been built up to a 
status of marked prosperity and it proves a valuable adjunct to the 
industrial activities of this section of the Buckeye State, as one of the 
foremost of its kind in the Hanging Rock Iron Region. The brothers 
effected the organization of the Nigh Lumber Company, which is in- 
corporated with a capital stock of $10,000, shared equally by the two. 
The plant and business at Catlettsburg, Kentucky, are conducted under 
the firm name of S. H. Nigh & Brother. He whose name initiat<^'i this 
review owns a half interest in each of these important business enter- 
prises, as already intimated, and he is likewise associated with his 
brother in the ownership of a valuable tract of 7,500 acres of timber 
land in Kentucky. In Ironton he owns his attractive modern resi- 
dence, known as a center of generous hospitality, besides other houses 
and lots. Mr. Nigh has proved a reliable and progressive business 
man and a loyal and public-spirited citizen, with abiding interest in 
all that pertains to the welfare of his home city and county. 

In polities Mr. Nigh is aligned as a supporter of the cnusi' of 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 655 

the republican party, and he is aflfiiliated with the Knights of Pythias and 
the ]\Iasonie fraternity, in the latter of which he has received the thirty- 
second degree of the Ancient Accepted Scottish Rite, besides being affi- 
liated with the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. Both he and his wife are zealous communicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church and he is a member of the vestry of the parish of- 
his church. 

In September, 1899, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Nigh to 
Miss Josephine Wood, daughter of George and Martha Wood, of Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, and the two children of this union are William H., 
Jr., and Samuel H. 

Oscar M. Coburn. Threescore and ten years measures the length 
of Mr. Coburn 's life to the present time, but measured by what he has 
experienced and accomplished, his career has many distinctions not 
dependent on the passing of time. Now living retired at Portsmouth, 
with abundance of material comforts, he spent his youth in the country 
district of Scioto County, won honors and rank as lieutenant during 
the war, and later devoted himself to varied business activities in this 
and other counties of Ohio. 

Oscar ]\I. Coburn was born in Columbiana County, Ohio, December 
25, 1844, and in the same house was bom his father, Arthur A. Coburn, 
in 1810. The grandfather, a native of Ireland, at the age of twelve came 
to America with an older brother, who settled in New England. Sub- 
se((uently Grandfather Coburn made his way into Northwest Territory, 
settling in what is now Columbiana County, where he secured a tract 
of timbered land about five miles from Salem and seven miles from 
Wellsville. Having improved a farm he and his wife lived there until 
death. Their eight children were James, Thomas, William, Arthur, 
Samuel, John, Margaret and Sarah. 

Arthur A. Coburn was reared and married in his native county and 
made it his home until 1846. The previous year he had visited Scioto 
County, and entered a tract of government land in Madison township. 
He proceeded to clear up five acres, and in the same fall sowed it to 
wheat and also built a cabin of round logs, with spilt-puncheon floors, 
a mud and stick chimney, and the roof was covered with clapboards, 
rived by hand and held in place by weight poles. The door was also 
made of a heavy puncheon, with a wooden latch, lifted by a deer thong, 
and the neighbors afterguards measured the hospitality of the Coburn 
home by saying "the latch string always is out." When this part of 
liis pioneer home-making was finished, he returned to Columbiana County 
for the winter, and in the spring embarked his household goods, stock, 



656 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

farm iiiipleinents, and family on an Ohio River steamboat, and came 
down the river to the new settlement. At that time there were no rail- 
roads in this section of Ohio, all transportation being by river, canal 
or highways. Mrs. Arthur Coburn was a type of the old-fashioned 
housewife. She carded, spun and wove both flax and wool, was the 
family tailor and dressmaker, and clothed them all in homespun. ]\Ir. 
Coburn with the assistance of his growing sons, cleared a farm and 
later built a commodious hewed log house, M'hich he weatherboarded 
and painted, and in which he lived until his death, in January, 1*876. 

Arthur A. Coburn married Martha Caldwell. She was born in 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. The father, Joseph Caldwell, was born in 
Scotland, and on coming to this country located in Pittsburg, where for 
several years he was engaged in the manufacture of axes. Later he 
moved north of Pittsburg into Mercer County, and bought land that 
included Sandy Lake, remaining there until his death at a good old age. 
His wife survived to the remarkable age of ninety-eight. Mrs. Coburn 
was well educated, and was a teacher before her marriage. She died 
in July, 1880. Her children were Thomas, Phebe A., James, Harvey, 
Caldwell, Martha J., Arthur, Oscar ^M., Robert and Theodore. Four of 
these sons, including Oscar, were soldiers in the Civil war. Thomas 
was killed at the battle of Fredericksburg, another died at Lexington, 
Kentucky, while Harvey, who enlisted at the first call and fought in the 
first Bull Run, was honorably discliarged and while coming home was 
crippled in a railway accident. 

Oscar M. Coburn grew up in the conuuunity wliere his parents liad 
settled when he was a child, and got his education from the rural schools. 
He was not yet seventeen when the war broke out, but he became one of 
the many boy volunteers who bore the brunt of the task of putting down 
the rebellion. In August, 1861, he enlisted in Company E of the Thirty- 
third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was with his command in its various 
skirmishes, battles and marches until the battle of Perryville, Kentucky. 
There he received a severe wound, was taken to the hospital at Louis- 
ville, and was given an honorable discharge February 27, 186;{. Not 
yet satisfied with soldering, he again enlisted May 9, 1863, this time in 
Battery F of the First Ohio Heavy Artillery. He went hy rail to Lex- 
ington, Kentucky, and thence marched to Knoxville, Tennessee, wher(^ 
he arrived the same month, being made corporal in his company. He 
had been in Knoxville only a short time when he was one of six detailed 
by General Schofield for secret service. This squad, commanded by 
George W. Kirk, crossed the mountains to North Carolina, their pur- 
pose being to discover a feasible route for an army. A Cherokee Indian 
was secured for a guide, but lost his way, and for tliree <lays they 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 657 

wandered in the mountains without food. i\Iany of the loyal moun- 
taineers joined in the expedition and piloted the way to Camp Vane<?. 
where 354 Confederates were yarding 398 Union prisoners. On reach- 
ing that place, Captain Kirk, who then had about ninety men around 
him, concluded to capture the prison camp. Young Coburn was detailed 
to take a flag of truce into the camp and demand its surrender. He 
got into the camp at daybreak while its commander was still in bed. 
He gave the commander five minutes to answer his demand for sur- 
render, and after a hurried cotisultation the demand was complied with. 

While these things were going on, young Coburn was too busy to 
write home, and his mother had addressed a letter of inquiry which fell 
into the hands of Capt. A. B. Cole, of Company F, First Oliio Heavy 
Artillery, and his reply to her in a letter which she carefully preserved, 
is an interesting document in Mr. Coburn 's career, and the substance 
of it is copied as follows: The latter was addressed from Knoxville, 
August 2, 1864, and reads as follows: "Your note to the Christian 
Commission was put in my hands this moment by one of the agents. 
You seek information of your son Oscar j\I. Coburn of my Company F. 
1st 0. V. H. A. I am surprised at this, for I had supposed that Oscar 
was very prompt in writing to his friends, and if he was not I know no 
good reason why you or any of his friends should hesitate for a moment 
to ask information of his captain, or rather of his former captain, for 
I am no longer so. Oscar is a first lieutenant in the Third North Caro- 
lina Cavalry. Oscar is in excellent good health and in fine spirits, and 
is a number one soldier. He was in my tent until 11 o'clock last night, 
and went to town but a few moments since on business for his regiment. 
We the offieere of his former regiment bought and presented him a 
sword. He is very well liked by his new friends. He went to North 
Carolina with Colonel Kirk of the Third North Carolina Mounted In- 
fantry on his great raid when they captured Camp Vance and 300 
prisoners. They had no white flag to send in when they made the 
demand for the surrender. Col. Kirk tore the tail or skirt from his 
shirt, and Oscar carried it in and made the demand for the surrender, 
which was complied with. In conclusion I would say that Oscar is very 
capable of taking care of himself, and you should give yourself no 
unnecessary anxiety on his account," etc. 

As the letter explains, after the capture of Camp Vance, Mr. Coburn 
and his comrades returned to the battery at Knoxville, and soon after- 
ward he was commissioned lieutenant of Company D of the Third North 
Carolina Mounted Infantry. On December 29, 1864, he was wounded 
at the battle of Indian Creek, North Carolina, and for thirty-six years 



658 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

carried the bullet in his body. At the close of hostilities he resigned his 
command and returned to the homestead farm in Ohio. 

After his marriage he began his career as an independent farmer on 
rented land at Lucasville, but two years later bought a sawmill and was 
a lumber manufacturer two years. His chief business, however, con- 
tinuing for twenty-five years was as contractor in the building of roads, 
railroads, bridges and similar construction work. He then entered the 
merchandise business in Harrisonville and in Harpster, Wyandotte 
County, for a year, following which for two years he operated a roller 
flour mill at Stockdale, in Pike County. He next began investing in 
farm lands, buying a farm in Madison Township, and in time had about 
600 acres. His home was in the country until 1895, when he moved to 
Portsmouth, bought a house on Summit Street and some unimproved 
land, and after making some improvements sold and bought TVo acres 
of the Young homestead, where he lived until October, 1914, when he 
moved to New Boston, Ohio. Mr. Coburn has laid out in lots and sold 
a portion of this city property. At present his only business is in 
looking after his private interests. 

On July 24, 1867, Mr. Coburn married Elizabeth Deemer, who was 
born in Beaver County, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Jacob and Susan, 
(Bonzoe) Deemer, natives of the same county. Grandfather Deemer 
was a native of Germany, while Grandfather Bonzoe was born in 
France. Mrs. Coburn 's parents settled in Madison Township, Scioto 
County, on a farm, in 1857, and her father died the same year. Her 
mother died at the Coburn home in 1884 in her eighty-seventh year. 

Mr. Coburn and wife have reared five children — Launa M., Lizadore, 
Ida Florence, Oscar I\I. and Ernest H. Launa is the wife of John R. 
jMonroe, and their five children are Ida F., who married John Spry and 
has two daughters, Goldie and Charlotte; Enid, who married Sylvane 
Portee, and has a son CuUen ; John ; Edith and Harlan. The daughter 
Lizadore married John S. Violet, and their four sons are Raymond D., 
Charles J., Forest C. and Arlin. The daughter Ida is the wife of 
William M. Brown, and has a daughter Wilma. Oscar ]\I.. Jr., married 
May Wheeler. Ernest married Ethel Dugan. 

For many years Mr. Coburn took a prominent part in the affairs 
of the Grand Army. He was a charter member of Bailey Post No. 164, 
and later organized Scioto Post at Harrisonville. He is affiliated with 
the Harrisonville Lodge of Knights of Pythias. He was reared in the 
Presbyterian Church, while Mrs. Coburn is of the Lutheran Church. 

William W. Gates, Jr. Numbered among the representative busi- 
ness men of the Citv of Portsmouth, Scioto County, Mr. Gates is here 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 659 

the treasurer of the Irving Drew Shoe Company, which is successfully 
engaged in the manufacturing of shoes and which represents one of the 
important industrial enterprises of the city. 

Mr. Gates is a scion of a family that was founded in Ohio in the early 
pioneer days and that found representation in New England in the 
colonial era of our national history. On a farm one-fourth of a mile 
distant from the Village of Cheshire, Gallia County, Ohio, William W. 
Gates, Jr., was born on the 13th of March, 1863, and the place of his 
nativity was a house that had there been erected by his paternal grand- 
father. He is a son of William W. and Alvina Elizabeth (Nye) Gates. 

William W. Gates, Sr., was born on a pioneer farmstead in the imme- 
diate vicinity of Marietta, Washington County, Ohio, on the 16th of 
October, 1827, and is a son of Samuel Haskell Gates, who was born in 
the Town of Kingston, Plymouth County, Massachusetts, on the 3d of 
September, 1792. The latter was a son of John Gates, who became the 
founder of the family in Ohio, to which state he came in the early part 
of the nineteenth century and numbered himself among the pioneer 
settlers of Washington County. There he purchased a tract of heavily 
timbered land and instituted the reclamation of a farm, this old home- 
stead being situated about one mile northeast of the site of the present 
courthouse in the City of Marietta. His original domicile was a log 
cabin, sixteen fe,et square, with chimney constructed of sticks and mud 
and with the expansive fireplace that served both for warming and cook- 
ing purposes, a pony having been used in dragging the mammoth back- 
logs into the little building and making them ready for the fireplace. 
This primitive house continued to be the family home for several years 
and then a more pretentious structure was provided, though the latter 
also had no semblance of modern architecture and facilities. John Gates 
was a man of strong mental and physical power and great sincerity 
and force of character. He was a deep Bible student and devout Chris- 
tian worker, and though not regularly ordained he was often called 
upon to serve as a local preacher. He was one of the influential and 
honored pioneers of Washington County and there both he and his wife 
passed the closing years of their lives at Marietta, the maiden name of 
the latter having been Haskell. 

Samuel Haskell Gates, grandfather of him whose name initiates this 
article, was a youth at the time of the family removal from Massa- 
chusetts to the pioneer wilds of Ohio, and he and his brother Eben 
succeeded eventually to the ownership of their father's old homestead 
farm, upon which they erected a substantial two-story house of hewed 
logs, near the site of the original cabin. In Washington County he 
learned the trade of cooper, which he successfvilly f611owed in connec- 



660 HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 

tion with his farming industry. Later he purchased another farm in 
the same vicinity and there he continued to reside until 1835, when he 
sold the property and removed to Gallia County. In the spring of 
1836 he purchased a tract of land in Cheshire Township, where he 
reclaimed a productive farm and in Gallia County he became also a 
successful dealer in farm produce, which he transported by flat-boats 
down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, in which city he 
found a profitable market for his produce, besides selling his boats, 
which were virtually impossible of the return navigation up the river. 
He made the return voyage to his home by means of the old-time packet 
steamboats, and he continued to reside on his old homestead in Gallia 
County until his death, which occurred March 23, 1847. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Wheeler, was born at Rutland, Vermont, and 
was a daughter of John Wheeler, who set forth for Ohio in company 
with his family, the household effects having been loaded on a sloop 
for transportation by the Great Lakes, but disaster having overtaken 
the little vessel; so that the goods of the sturdy pioneer was lost. Upon 
his arrival in Ohio Mr. Wheeler established the family home in Licking 
County, where he passed the residue of his life. Mrs. Mary (Wheeler) 
Gates survived her husband and was summoned to the life eternal on 
the 8th of August, 1855, their eight children having been : WiUiam 
W., Henry W., Lucy A., Samuel H., John B., Abbie A., Harriet C. and 
Franklin 0. 

AVilliam W. Gates, Sr., was reared to manhood under the sturdy dis- 
cipline of the home farm and finally he removed with his family from 
Gallia County to West Virginia, w^here he remained for a comparatively 
short period. On his return to Ohio he established his residence in 
Scioto County, where he leased a farm near Portsm6utli and for several 
years there gave his attention to diversified agriculture and stock- 
growing. Venerable in years, he lived retired in the City of Portsmouth, 
secure in the high regard of all who knew^ him until his death, July 
7, 1915. His wife was born on a farm near Pomeroy, Meigs County, 
Ohio, and is a daughter of Melzar Nye, who was born at Litchfield, 
Connecticut, in 1785, a son of Ebenezer Nye, who likewise was a nativ<> 
of Connecticut and who came thence to the Northwest Territory, tlimi 
including Ohio, in the year 1790. This was soon after the little settl(>- 
ment had been established at historic old Marietta, Ohio, and in tlie 
stockade there established as protection against the Indians he and iiis 
family resided five years. Later he purchased a tract of land nine miles 
distant from the now thriving city of Marietta, on the banks of the 
Muskingum River, and there he resided many years, as one of the stei-ling 
pioneers who aided in the social and material development of the ]>uek- 



HANGING KOCK IKON liEGlUN 661 

eye State in the early stages of its history. lie had been a valiant soldier 
of the Continental Line in the War of the llevolution and he passed the 
closing period of his long and useful life at Barnesville, Belmont County, 
where he died in the year 1829. His wife, whose maiden name was Desire 
Sawyer, had passed to eternal rest in 1800. 

Melzar Nye as a boy and youth gained ample experience in connec- 
tion with the labors and hardships of pioneer life on the embryonic farm 
of his father, and as a young man he assisted in the making of some of 
the original surveys in Washington County, where he finally bought a 
tract of land near his father's homestead. He cleared and otherwise 
improved much of this land and there remained until 1827, when he sold 
the property and removed to Meigs County, where he purcliased a farm 
in Salisbury Township. He reclaimed this homestead and on the same 
passed the residue of his life, his death having occurred Avhen he was 
eighty-eight years of age. He wedded Miss Phoebe Sprague, who was 
born in Massachusetts, her ancestors having been numbered among the 
founders of Hingham, that state, and an excellent genealogical history 
of this sterling old family having been compiled and published by 
Warren Vincent Sprague. Mrs. Phoebe (Sprague) Nye was born in 
1788 and died at the age of seventy-two years. Her six children wlio 
attained to years of maturity were: Mary D., Margaretta Z., Sarah C, 
Melzar, Almira and Alvira (twins). Alvira, who was the wife of W. \V. 
Gates, Sr., died June 4, 1915. 

At this juncture is entered brief record concerning the children cf 
William W. and Alvira Elizabeth (Nye) Gates: Ella is the wife of 
Irving Drew, the executive head of the Portsmouth Shoe IManufactory 
which bears his name; Laura is the wife of Stephen Chick, of Ports- 
mouth; William W., Jr., is the innnediate subject of this review; llattie 
is the wife of Lewis Spencer, of Portsmouth; and p]dward S. and John 
are deceased. 

Passing the days of his boyhood on the farm, William W. (iates, Jr., 
acquired his pi'eliminary education in the district schools and supple- 
mented this by attending the public schools of Portsmoutli. At the age 
of seventeen years he here entered the employ of the Drew-Sell)y Shoe 
Company, in various depa^^tments of whose factory he gained practical 
experience in all details of the biisiness. He continued with tliis con- 
cern until the dissolution of the partnership of the principals, in 1902, 
and he then became associated with Mr. Drew and others in organi/.in ti- 
the Irviiig Drew Compan}^ of which he became ti-easurer, an office of 
which he has been the incumbent from the time of the incorporation 
of the company. He has been one of the influential factors in the 
development of the large and substantial business of the company and 



662 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

is known as an able executive as well as a man of broad and accurate 
knowledge of the practical details of the industrial enterprise with which 
he is identified. 

Mr. Gates is not only one of the substantial business men and liberal 
and progressive citizens of Portsmouth but has also ordered his life in 
such a way as to merit and receive the confidence and esteem of all with 
whom he has come in contact. His political allegiance is given to the 
republican party and both he and his wife are members of the Second 
Presbyterian Church in their home city, he having served for more than 
a decade past as superintendent of its Sunday school. 

In the year 1888 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gates to Miss 
Harriet S. Chick, who was born on a farm in Clay Township, Scioto 
County, and who is a daughter of Charles and Sarah (Lawson) Chick, 
the former of whom died in 1877 and the latter in 1910. 

Charles Chick was born in Gallia County, this state, on the 23d of 
December, 1823, and was a son of William Chick, a native of Somerset- 
shire, England, where he was born in 1794. In 1817 William Chick, 
accompanied by his brothers, Charles and John, immigrated to the 
United States. In his native land he had learned the trade of stone- 
mason, at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, and after coming to America he 
followed his trade several years, in Scioto County, Ohio. In 1828 he 
purchased a farm of 500 or 600 acres in the French Grant and removed 
his family there. In 1846 he purchased a tract of 237 acres, including 
the present site of the Burgess Steel and Iron Works, but while prepar- 
ing to move to his new house was taken sick and died at the old home- 
stead in the French Grant, his wife, whose maiden name was Nancy 
Skinner, having preceded him to the "Great Beyond" the year previous. 
Both were members of the Baptist Chuix-h, in the faith of which they 
reared their eight children. 

Charles Chick devoted his entire active life to agricultural pursuits 
and became one of the representative agriculturists and stock-growers of 
Scioto County. He purchased the interests of the other heirs to his 
father's extensive farm and on the same he continued to reside until 
his death, his widow having thereafter removed to the City of Ports- 
mouth, where she maintained her home during the residue of her life. 
In 1854 Charles Chick wedded Miss Sarah Lawson, daughter of John 
and Rebecca Watson Lawson, June, 1854. Thomas Lawson, grandfather 
of John Lawson, was a native of Hampshire County, Virginia, and a 
representative of that fine old commonwealth as a patriot soldier in the 
War of the Revolution. William Lawson, gi'andfather of Sarah Lawson, 
was one of the first settlers in Scioto County, Ohio, having located on 
the tract of land now occupied by the City of Portsmouth. Michael 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 663 

Watson, great-grandfather of Sirs. Gates on the maternal side, was a 
native of Maryland, whence he removed to Kentucky in 1790, and from 
the latter state he came to Ohio in 1804 and became one of the very 
early settlers of Adams County, where he continued to reside until his 
death. 

John L. Hinze. Nowhere can be found more attractive homesteads 
than those that adorn the landscape along the Scioto River. One such 
farm that adds its measure to the general outlook in Washington Town- 
ship of Scioto County is owned by John L. Hinze, who lias spent all his 
life since boyhood in this vicinity, and has been known and honored for 
his success in the fundamental industry of agriculture and for hi.s up- 
right character and good citizenship. 

John L. Hinze is a native of the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, 
where he was born August 23, 1848, about the time of the Revolution 
which sent so many sterling German-Americans to the New World. 
His father, John L. Hinze, Sr., was a physician, was born, reared and 
educated in the same locality, and had a thorough training for his 
profession. In 1850, accompanied by his family, he came to America, 
and for eight years was engaged in practice at Clarksburg, then 
Virgina, and now West Virginia. At the end of that time he returned 
to Germany, but stayed only a year and a half, when he again came 
to the United States, and this time found a home in Scioto County. 
He bought a farm in Union Township, and thereafter combined the 
practice of medicine throughout the surrounding country with the 
supervision of his farming interests until his death at the age of 
seventy-one. Doctor Hinze married Anna Mary Brandt, who was 
born in Hanover and died when about sixty-five years of age. There 
are three sons and one daughter : John L. ; Frederick, who lives in 
Pickaway County; Henry, deceased; and Anna, the wife of AVilliam 
Buffinger, of Washington Township. 

John L. Hinze was about two years old when the family first came 
to America, and attended the schools of Virginia for several years, 
had part of his education in Germany, and was in school at Portsmouth 
until ready to take up the serious responsibilities of life. In the mean- 
time he had assisted in the duties of the farm in Scioto County, and 
at the age of twenty-one started out independently. Though he had 
little to begin with and has worked out his own destiny, his .success 
is not less substantial than that of many men better favored at the 
beginning. He farmed as a renter for about three years, and then 
invested his surplus in his present farm. It is located on the Galena 
Pike, and 100 acres lie in the rich and fertile Scioto Vallev. During 



664 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

his ownership some substantial buildings have been erected, including 
a frame residence, with two barns, and cribs with capacity of 6,000 
bushels of corn on the cob. The buildings and their grounds are all 
in the Village of Rapptown, which is an addition to Davis Division. 
The location is on the west side of Galena Pike, and it commands a 
tine view of the Scioto Valley and the region beyond. 

Mr. Hinze was first married in 1871 to Elizabeth Malone. She was 
born in AVashington Township, a daughter of Isaac and Mary Ann 
(Utt) Malone, her father of Scotch-Irish and her mother of German 
ancestry. 'Slvs. Hinze died in 1908, leaving the following children: 
Es.sie, Ida, John, Tracey, Homer, Carrie, Archie, Alabel and Glen. The 
daughter Essie married John Seymour and has one child, Elizabeth. 
Ida married Edward Long. Mabel is the wife of George Chackart, 
and has a daiighter named Alna Lorene. John married Lola Seymour, 
and has a son, Ralph. Tracey married Miss Rose, and tlieir two sons arc 
Stanley and Cecil. Carrie married Esse Hill and has a daughter 
named Garnet. 

After the death of his first wife Mr. Hinze married Mrs. Elizabeth 
(Graham) Deal. She was born in Washington Township, a daughter 
of Peter Noel Graham, who was a native of Union Township and his 
parents. James and Margaret (Noel) Graham, were among the pioneers 
of Scioto County. I'eter N. Graham was a man of superior education 
for his time. During his residence in Washington Township from the 
age of sixteen until his death at sixty-four he proved himself a suc- 
cessful farmer and was honored with a number of local offices. He 
married Alargaret I^tt, who was l>orn in Pennsylvania, came to Ohio 
at the age of seven with her parents, and died at the age of thirty- 
nine. Mrs. Hinze 's first husband, Henry Deal, a native of Kentucky, 
operated a stone quarry on Gary's Run for several years before his 
death, which occurred at the age of forty-one. Mrs. Hinze by her 
first marriage has four children, named Clara Belle, Elizabeth M., 
Henry V. and Wilber P. 

Mr. Hinze 's parents were faithful members of the Lutheran faith, 
but as there is no church of that denomination in Washington Town- 
ship he has united with and worships in the Old Town IVlethodist Epis- 
copal Church. 

John Wittm.vn. One of the oldest men in Jackson County is John 
Wittman. who has lived in this part of Ohio more than three-quarters 
of a century. His years of activity were spent as a farmer, and have 
been fruitful in tlie things that go with material prosperity and also 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 665 

in tlie honor paid a good citizen who rears a family of useful men and 
women. 

John Wittman was born near Allentown, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1830, 
and is now eighty-six years old. His father was Henry Wittman, a 
native of Pennsylvania, while the grandfather saw service as a teamster 
in the army of General Washington, and was at Valley Forge during 
that memorable winter that passed with so much suffering to the Ameri- 
can troops and with so much gloom to all the hard-pressed colonies. 
Henry Wittman for an occupation learned the trade of shoemaker. 
There were no shoe factories then, turning out footwear by machinery, 
and the cobbler was a useful man in every community, did all his work 
by hand, and made boots and shoes only by order. In 1838 he left 
Pennsylvania with his family and came to Ohio. No railroads had yet 
been built west of the Alleghenies, and the journey was made by wagon 
and canal boat. They tarried awhile in Stark County, then went to 
Columbus, and on reaching Piketon took a team and wagon for the rest 
of the distance to Jackson County. Their location was in Scioto Town- 
ship, where several Pennsylvania German families had preceded them. 
There Henry Wittman bought a tract of timber land, erected a log 
cabin, and that was the first home of the Wittmans in Ohio. The winter 
months were spe^t in cobbling for the settlers, while the rest of the year 
he spent in clearing off his land and tilling the soil. Henry Wittman 
died in that locality after a life of nearly eighty years. The maiden 
name of his wife was Lizzie Morey, a native of Pennsylvania and of 
German ancestry. She died soon after coming to Ohio, but six of her 
children grew up, as follows: Man', Catherine, Jesse, Elizabeth, Wil- 
liam and John. 

John Wittman, the only survivor of this family, was reared to the 
vocation of agriculture, and for an education had to depend upon the 
primitive instruction of subscription schools. After reaching manhood 
he bought an unimproved farm near the old home, and for many years 
was busied with its clearing and cultivation. He still lives there, and 
in spite of his age is a hale and clear-minded old man. 

John Wittman married Elizabeth Ann Eliek, who was born in Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, in 1842. Her father, David Elick, was bom in Germany, 
came to America in young manhood, and was employed in the iron works 
at Portsmouth, which city was his home until his death. Both he and 
his wife, whose maiden name was Anna Leser, died of the cholera in 
1854. They left six children. Their son, David Elick, was well known 
in Portsmouth, where for years he published the Tribune, but in 1883 
moved to Minneapolis, where he and Mr. Alvord founded the Commer- 
cial Bulletin. 



6ri6 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Elizabeth Ann Elick was a small child when her mother died, and she 
made her home with her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Leser, until 
her marriage." She died in 1910 at the age of sixty-eight. She was the 
mother of ten children, all of whom live to revere her memory. Their 
names are: Hattie, Ann, James D., John H., Frances E., George B., 
William J., Harry S., Cecilia C. and Jessie M. 

James D. Wittman. One of the sons of John Wittman, whose career 
and family lineage are sketched above, is James D. Wittman, now sec- 
retary and treasurer of the jMorning Star Publishing Company of 
Portsmouth, and for many years active in newspaper work. 

He was born in October, 1866, in Scioto Township of Jackson County, 
and spent his early life on the homestead still occupied by his father. 
The rural schools gave him his first instruction, and later he was a stu- 
dent in the Jackson Academy and in 1888 graduated from the National 
Normal University at Lebanon. His work, which he followed for 
several years, was teaching, and he was connected with the schools of 
Jackson County. From that he turned his attention to journalism, and 
for fourteen years was editor of the Jackson Herald. In 1914 he came 
to Portsmouth, and became one of the founders of the Morning Star, 
and is now secretary and treasurer of the company that publishes that 
paper. 

Fraternally he is a member of Trowel Lodge, Ancient Free and Ac- 
cepted Ma^^ons, of the Royal Arch Chapter and the Council, and of Jack- 
son Commandery of Knights Templar ; also of Theseus Lodge, Knights 
of Pythias. Mr. Wittman was married July 26, 1900, to Clara F. Drake, 
who was born in Brockton, ]\Iassachusetts, a daughter of Francis and 
Lyphenia E. <Shaw) Drake, who were natives of Plymouth, Massa- 
chusetts. 

George B. Wittman. Some of the best qualities of farming and 
general business enterprise are represented in the career of George B. 
Wittman, w^ho is known pretty generally throughout both 'Jackson and 
Scioto counties, and is one of the largest farmers in Nile Township of 
the latter county. Mr. Wittman is a son of John Wittman, one of the 
oldest residents of Jackson County, a sketch of whom is given in pre- 
ceding paragraphs. 

George B. Wittman was born in Scioto Township of Jackson County, 
October 28, 1873. His boyhood associations revolve about that locality 
and the old homestead farm, and while growing to manhood he attended 
the rural schools and got a practical training as a farmer. Farming 
was his regular business until 1899, at which time he opened a stock 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 667 

of general merchandise at what was then called Whitman but is now 
Glade Station. Besides general merchandise he was also in the lumber 
business, and was the principal merchant of that little community until 
1912. He then removed to farm he still occupies, in Nile Township, 
where he has 500 acres, a portion of it in the fertile bottoms along the 
river. Few farms in the township measure up to the general standard 
of improvement and management maintained by Mr. Wittman. His 
residence, built of stone, is one of the interesting landmarks of that 
community, and is one of the oldest homes still standing and in use in 
the county. While superintending the cultivation of his farm to gen- 
eral crops, I\Ir. Wittman is also clearing off the timber, which is being 
sawed into lumber for the local markets. 

Mr. Wittman was married in 1903 to ]\Iiss Blanche Gordon, a 
woman of education and culture, who has since presided over his home. 
She was born in Stoekdale, Pike County, Ohio, a daughter of William 
B. and Mary Gordon. To their marriage have bften born two children, 
Huber and Harold. Mr. and ]\Irs. Wittman are members of the Mc- 
Kendree Methodist Episcopal Church, while he affiliates with Alhambra 
Lodge, Knights of Pythias. Politically a democrat, he cast his first vote 
for William J. Bryan. 

Ernst Horschel. Successfully conducting one of the attractive and 
popular meat markets of the city of Ironton, J\Ir. Horschel has shown 
marked ability and circumspection in catering to the demands of an ap- 
preciative patronage and is one of the substantial and loyal business men 
of the Iron City. 

Mr. Horschel was born in Germaiiy, on the 16th of June, 1844, and 
is a son of Frederick and Barbara (Blackschmidt) Horschel, who passed 
their entire lives in the German Fatherland, where the father, was a 
farmer and butcher, his birth having occurred in 1803, and his death in 
1871, in which year occurred also the death of his wife, who was born in 
1798 and who was thrice married, the name of her first husband having 
been Horn, and that of her second husband Cronaeher. Henry Horn 
was the only child of the first marriage, and Frederick Cronaeher the one 
child of the second marriage. Of the six children of the third union, 
Ernst Horschel, of this review, is the only one living, he being the young- 
est of the number. The names of the deceased children were as here 
noted: Andrew, Ernestina, Sophia, Edward, Rosina and Ernst. 

Ernst Horschel attended the schools of his native land until he was 
fourteen years of age, and thereafter he was employed at farm work and 
in the butcher shop of his father until 1864, when, at the age of twenty 
years, he immigrated to the United States. He made Ironton, Ohio, his 



668 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

destination and here he found employment in the meat market conducted 
by his two half-brothers, Henry Horn and Frederick Cronacher. In 1884 
he opened a market of his own, and he has since continued without inter- 
ruption in the meat-market business in Ironton, being now the pioneer 
representative of this line of enterprise in the city and having won suc- 
cess through industry, careful management and reliable service. 

■Retaining the best traditions of his native land, ]\Ir. Horschel has 
entered fully into the progressive spirit of the United States and is em- 
phatically loyal and appreciative as an American citizen. He is aligned 
as a supporter of the republican party, and he and his family are com- 
municants of the Lutheran church. Mr. Horschel has been ambitious 
and self-reliant and has made good use of the advantages afforded in the 
land of his adoption, with the result that his material success is on a 
parity with his personal hold upon popular confidence and good will. 
He is a stockholder in the Masting Steel Company, the Foster Stove 
Company, the Citizens' National Bank of Ironton, and a stockholder and 
director of the First National Bank of this city, besides which he is 
the owner of valuable real estate, including twenty-four acres of attrac- 
tive hill land in Upper township, a residence and business building at 
272 South Third Street and three business blocks opposite his meat mar- 
ket building on South Third Street. 

On the 18th of June, 1869, at the home of the bride's parents, in 
Scioto county, was solemnized the marriage of ^Ir. Horschel to I\Iiss Eliza- 
beth Froncin, daughter of the late Frederick Froncin, and she has proved 
his valued helpmeet and devoted companion during the long intervening 
years. Concerning their children, the following brief record is given in 
conclusion of this sketch: Ernst F., who is the manager of the Ironton 
Automobile Garage, wedded Miss Anna Gills, and they have two children; 
Henry C. who is associated Avith his father in the meat-market business, 
married Miss Lizzie Mahoney, and they have one child ; Frederick F., 
who is engaged in the insurance business and is serving as city treasurer 
of Ironton, married Miss Ida Delaney, and they have two children ; 
Ernestine, who remains at the parental home, is a talented artist who de- 
votes special attention to china painting ; and Jacob is likewise associated 
with his father's business. 

George Mayne, chief of the department of police of the city of Iron- 
ton has won promotion to the head of his department both because of 
his fearlessness as an officer and his executive talents. A native of Iron- 
ton, he has been connected with the police force for a period of seventeen 
vears, and his record is one of which any official might well be proud. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 669 

Chief Mayiie was born February 3, 1868, and is a son of John C. and 
Lnema (Rowe) Mayne. 

John C. Mayne was born near Blossburg, Pennsylvania, in 1835, and 
in his native locality was engaged as a teamster and rolling mill man. 
Subsequently he enlisted for service in the Civil war as a member of the 
Forty-fifth Kentucky Mounted Infantry. After serving for eighteen 
niojiths under arms he was made a teamster, and so completed his mili- 
tary service, being thus engaged for two years. Following his honorable 
discharge, Mr. Mayne came to the Hanging Rock Region, about the year 
1865, and here continued to follow rolling mill work during the balance 
of his active career. Mrs. Mayne was born in Pike county, Kentucky, in 
1810, and was eighteen years of age when she came to Ironton, Ohio, 
where she still makes her home. She has been the mother of six children, 
as follows : John A., George, Thomas R., Charles A., Esther A. and 
Grace. 

George Mayne received only ordinary educational advantages in the 
public schools, for at the age of twelve years he laid aside his books to 
begin to learn the trade of cooper. He continued to be employed at that 
vocation for some thirteen years, and then entered the rolling mills, where 
lie remained three years. In 1897 Mr. Mayne qualified for the police 
force of Ironton and began his duties in that year, and as a tribute to his 
character as a brave, active and efficient officer, he speedily won promo- 
tion until February 13, 1914, he reached the height of his deserved promo- 
tions, being appointed chief of police. He has since demonstrated a 
marked administrative ability, and has instilled a new spirit of earnest- 
ness and reform into the service. 

Chief Mayne was married February 11, 1898, at Ironton, to Miss 
Emma Evans, daughter of Evan Evans of this city, and six children have 
been born to this union : Newell E., George E., Irving, Ruth, Elizabeth, 
and Avonell, of whom Ruth is deceased. Politically, Chief Mayne is a 
republican. With his family, he attends the Baptist church, in the work 
of which he has been active. He owns an attractive home and spends 
much of his time there, but is also fond of the companionship of his 
fellows and is a popular member of the Encampment of the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, and the Junior Order 
United American Mechanics. When he can spare the time from his 
arduous official duties he takes hunting trips and fishing excursions into 
the mountains, always accompanied by his family. 

Charles F. Miller. A resident of Ironton since 1871, Charles F. 
^Miller has been long identified with the business interests of this city, 
and through enterprise, industry and good management has gained a 



670 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

place for himself among the substantial class of citizens. He is a native 
of Germany, born at Worms, November 29, 1848, and is a son of Charles 
F. and Kathryn (Mumm) Miller. His father, a police officer in Ger- 
many, never came to the United States, passing away in 1860, at the age 
of fifty years. The mother, born in Germany in 1830, survived until 
1902. There were four children in the family: William, Louisa, Elsie 
and Charles F. 

Charles F. Miller attended the public schools of his native land until 
reaching the age of twelve years, at which time his father died and he 
was forced to go to w^ork in order to assist in the support of the family. 
Learning the tinner's trade, he worked thereat in Germany until 1866, 
and in that year, deciding that opportunities for success were greater in 
America, came to this country and settled at Allegheny, Pennsylvania, 
that city being his home until 1868. Following this he spent three years 
at Marietta, Ohio, but in 1871 came to Ironton, and here worked at his 
trade as a journeyman until 1891, when, with Joseph Marquard as a 
partner, he established a business of his own. The firm of ^Miller & 
Marquard grew and prospered until 1901, when Mr. Marquard died, and 
since that time Mr. ]\Iiller has continued the business alone. He has 
been very successful, and feels that prosperity has come to him because 
he has endeavored faithfully to give full value for every dollar received 
by him, and to give his own personal attention to details of the business. 
In addition to his place of business, on South Second Street, Mr. Miller 
owns his own home at No. 257 South Seventh Street. He is a valued 
member of the Chamber of Commerce, and in numerous ways has assisted 
in the growth and development of his adopted city, where he has resided 
for so many years. He is a democrat, but not a politician, and has 
never asked favors of his party. Mr. Miller is a member of St. Joseph's 
Catholic congregation and of the Knights of Columbus. 

Mr. Miller was married April 23, 1872, at Marietta, Ohio, to INliss 
Barbara Sehillott, daughter of John Schillott, and seven children were 
born to this union : Clara, who married Matthew 'Shaunessy, a clerk 
at Columbus, Ohio, and has four children : jMiller M., Mary, Kathryn, and 
Jack ; George, who married Nellie Gillman, a salesman and lives in Cali- 
fornia ; Emory, who married Lena Heitsman, is a tinner in partnership 
with his father, and has one child, Charles J. ; Otto, who is deceased ; 
Karl, who is single and resides with his parents; Helen, who married 
Elmer Anderson, now employed by the Union Gas and Fuel Company at 
Huntington, West Virginia ; and Ida, who is deceased. The meniliers of 
this family are all widely known and highly esteemed. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 671 

John D. Helbling. The reputation of the successful general con- 
tractors of the Hanging Rock Region is not made in a day, prosperity in 
this ])road field demanding not alone unusual abilities, but thorough 
training and broad experience. Commencing in business at Ironton some 
twenty-two years ago, John D. Helbling has steadily advanced to the 
front in reputation and the legitimate rewards of svich a standing, and 
as a member of the firm of Wileman & Helbling shares in the prosperity 
that has come to one of Ironton 's progressive ventures. Mr. Helbling 
was liorn November 15, 1864, in Brown County, Ohio, and is a son of 
Michael and Kathryn (Ring) Helbling. 

Michael Helbling was born in Pennsylvania, in 1837, and for many 
years was engaged in the manufacture of bricks, but since 1911 has lived 
retired from active pursuits, and now makes his home at Ironton. Mrs. 
Helbling, who was born in Germany, in 1838, and came to the United 
States in girlhood, died in 1912, having been the mother of nine children, 
as follows : May ; John D., of this review ; Nicholas li., who is deceased ; 
Margaret ; William ; Kathryn ; Flora ; Charles D., and Luella, who is 
deceased. Until reaching the age of fifteen years, John D. Helbling at- 
tended the public schools of Ironton, and at that time began to learn the 
trade of brick mason, working in his father's brick yard and continuing 
to lie thus engaged until 1892. In that year he formed a partnership 
with Harry Wileman, under the firm style of Wileman & Helbling, and 
they have since carried on a prosperous and constantly increasing busi- 
ness, their plant and stock now being valued at $7,000. Mr. Helbling 
is a business man of more than ordinary ability, and his standing is that 
of one who adheres to the strictest principles of integrity and honorable 
dealing. Although he devotes the greater part of his attention to his 
brick manufacturing and general contracting business, he also has other 
interests, is a stockholder of the Ironton Artificial Stone Company, and 
owns his own residence on South Third Street and a residence property 
in the same locality. He is a valued member of the Chamber of Com- 
merce, and his fraternal connection is with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks. With his family, he attends St. Joseph's Catholic Church. 
IMovements calculated to benefit his adopted city and its people always 
find in him a stalwart supporter, but he has taken no active part in poli- 
tics save as a republican voter. 

On July 12, 1892, at the home of the bride, Mr. Helbling was united 
in marriage with Miss Kathryn Spanner, daughter of Conrad Spanner, of 
Ironton, and to this union there have come three children : Frances, 
Cecelia, and Emerson. The children have all been given good educational 



672 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

advantages, and the Misses Helbling hold positions as stenographers in 
the office of the C. & 0. Railway. The family home is at No. 196 South 
Third Street. 

Joseph J. Abele. Though he is able to claim the fine old Keystone 
State of the Union as the place of his nativity, this well-known citizen 
and representative business man of Ironton, Lawrence County, has re- 
sided in this city since he was a boy of five years, and liere he has found 
opportunity for the achieving of marked success along norma! and pro- 
ductive lines of enterprise, the while he has never permitted himself to Ije 
deflected in the least from the straight course of industry and integrity, 
with the result that he has not been denied the fullest measure of popular 
confidence and esteem. Mr. Abele owns and operates a well equipped and 
thoroughly modern planing mill and manufactory of sash, doors and 
blinds, the plant representing a valuation of about $9,000, and here he 
has built up a large and prosperous business, the scope and importance 
of which give him place as one of the substantial and influential business 
men of the thriving city of Ironton. 

Joseph J. Abele was born in the immediate vicinity of the city of Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania, on the 5th of July, 1856, and is a son of Andrew 
and Nancy (Bulsinger) Abele, both natives of Germany, where the for- 
mer was born in 1835, and the latter in 1848. The marriage of the par- 
ents was solemnized in their native land, whence they iunnigrated to 
America in the early '50s. They continued their residence in Pennsyl- 
vania until about the time of the inception of the Civil war, when they 
came to Ironton, Ohio, where Andrew Abele for many years held the 
position of superintendent of the yards of the firm of Wise & Woruer, 
who operated the first planing mill in Ironton. In this city he continued 
to maintain his home, a sterling and honored citizen, uiitil the close of 
his life, in 1909, his loved and cherished wife having been sununoned to 
eternal rest in the preceding year, so that, after long years of loving com- 
panionship, they were not long separated in death. Of their eight chil- 
dren four are living: Joseph J., Cynthia, John, and George. 

Joseph J. Abele, as previously stated, was five years of age at the time 
of the family removal from Pennsylvania to Ironton, and to the public 
schools of this city he is inde])ted for his early educational advantages, 
the discipline having been effectively supplemented by the ]es.son gained 
in the practical school of experience. At the age of thirteen years IMr. 
Abele }>egan working in a saw mill, and he continued to be identified 
with various phases of lumber manufacturing until 1905, when he ini- 
tiated an independent career by leasing the planing mill of the Ironton 
Lumber Company. This he operated about eighteen months and he then 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 673 

purchased his present plant, in 1907, since which year he has here carried 
forward a specially prosperous business, his patronage being firmly based 
upon effective service and fair and honorable dealings. Mr. Abele gives 
close and effective attention to his business but does not permit the same 
to so hedge him in that he fails to accord loyal support to enterprises 
and movements tending to advance the social and material welfare of his 
home city, where he is known as a progressive and public-spirited citizen 
and as a stalwart supporter of the cause of the democratic party. In 
addition to his manufacturing plant he is the owner of the residence 
property which constitutes the attractive family home, and he is an activt' 
member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce. He and his family are 
communicants of the Catholic Churcn, as members of the parish of St. 
Joseph's Church, and he is affiliated with the Knights of St. George. 

On the 15th of July, 1878, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Abele 
to Miss Emma Mary Hubbard, daughter of the late Michael and Eliza 
(Meyer) Hubbard, of Kelley's Mills, Lawrence County, and all of the 
four children remain at the parental home : Mary, who is a dressmaker 
by vocation; Charles, who is associated with his father in business; and 
Alma and Julius. 

Moses Greenberg. For many years the United States and its busi- 
ness opportunities have been exploited in other lands, and to this coun- 
try 's shores have come people of every land to take advantage of these. 
A welcome has been extended to all, and many of the prosperous citizens 
of our most thriving communities are those of foreign birth. A native 
of Russia, R. Greenberg came to America in young manhood, and after 
some experience in various other sections, finally settled permanently at 
Ironton, Ohio, where he has since developed an excellent business and 
has taken his place among the men who are maintaining the city's pres- 
tige in commercial circles. 

Mr. Greenberg was born in Russia, January 20, 1866, and is a son of 
Joseph Greenberg, who was born in that country in 1803. The father 
was a teacher by vocation, and never came to the United States, dying iu 
his native land in 1896. Mr. Greenberg never knew a mother's care, for 
she died when he was an infant, he being the youngest of a family of 
five children. He w^as educated in Russia, largely under his father's pre- 
ceptorship until thirteen years of age, and at that time began to share 
responsibilities with his brothers and sisters in the support of the family. 
When nineteen years old he went to Turkey, which country he made his 
home until coming to America in 1888. For one year after his arrival 
he resided" at Cincinnati, Ohio, and then went to Indian Territory, where 
he established himself in the general merchandise business and remained 



674 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

until 1896, meeting with a fair measure of success. In that year he re- 
turned to Cincinnati, but in 1899 came to Ironton, where he engaged in 
the scrap iron and second-hand business, in which he has continued to 
the present time. This venture, commenced in a modest way, steadily 
grew under Mr. Greenberg's native industry and business ability, and is 
now one of the thriving enterprises of Ironton. He deals in wholesale 
hides, wools, scrap iron, metals, furs, roots, ginseng, beeswax, rubber 
and second-hand machinery, and is the owner of his own business prop- 
erty on North Second Street, in addition to a comfortable, modern resi- 
dence at No. 208 South Fifth Street. Mr. Greenberg is a stockholder in 
the Home Telephone Company and a director in the Ironton Malleable 
Iron Works. He holds membership in the Chamber of Commerce. His 
religion is that of the Jewish faith, and his political belief that of the 
republican party, although political matters have played little part in 
his life here. His success is well merited and has been gained through 
constant and sturdy application, good business ability and honorable 
dealing with those who have been associated with him in transactions. 

Mr. Greenberg was married June 30, 1890, to Miss Rosie Lapin, at 
that time a resident of Covington, Kentucky, but a native of Germany. 
They have had one child, who died in infancy. 

Harry H. Campbell. A man of marked prominence in business, po- 
litical, church and social circles, Harry H. Campbell has been an import- 
ant factor in the substantial growth and development of Ironton, and as 
president of the Ironton Wood Mantel Company, is the directing head of 
an enterprise that contributes substantially to the prestige of this city 
as an important business center. Mr. Campbell has been a resident of 
the city all of his life, having been born here May 17, 1853, and is a son 
of Hiram and Elizabeth (Woodrow) Campbell. 

Hiram Campbell was born at Blue Lick Springs, back of Maysville, 
Kentucky, in 1812, and as a young man migrated to Ohio, where for a 
long period of years he was identified with iron furnaces and was known 
as a substantial and resourceful business man. In his later years he re- 
tired with a competency, and lived quietly until his death, which oc- 
curred in 1896. Mrs. Campbell was born at Hillsboro, Ohio, in 1816, and 
is also deceased, she being the mother of four children, namely: Marie, 
who l)ecame the wife of J. H. Moulton and now resides at Ironton ; John 
W., whose home is in Virginia; Joseph H., of Cincinnati, Ohio; and 
Harry H. 

Harry H. Campbell received his education in the public schools of 
Ironton, and at the Miami University, and as a young man joined his 
father in business. Subsequently he embarked in ventures of his own, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 675 

and eventually became the founder of the Ironton Wood Mantel Com- 
pany. Avhich he has since continued to conduct with much success. He is 
a stockholder in the Ohio Iron and Coal Company, and has various other 
interests of an important character, and has evidenced his confidence in 
the future of Ironton by investing in property here, owning his own home 
and two other houses and lots. He has done much to advance Ironton 's 
interests in a business way, and has been one of the most active members 
of the Chamber of Commerce, with which he has been connected since its 
inception. A republican in politics, he has stood high in the councils of 
his party, and for eight years has served conscientiously and capably as a 
member of the city council, winning re-election by reason of his support 
of his fellow-citizens' interests and privileges. Always an active, virile 
man, Mr. Campbell has found much pleasure in out-door sports. Edu- 
cational and religious movements have in him a stanch supporter, and 
he holds membership in the Presliyterian church, where he is serving in 
the dual capacity of elder and treasurer. 

On May 27, 1878, at the home of the bride, Mr. Campbell was united 
in marriage with ]\Iiss Lizzie Bixby, daughter of E. Bixby, a resident of 
Ironton. Six children have been born to this union, namely : Marian, 
who became the wife of R. E. ^Mitchell, a professional singer of Ironton, 
and has four children : Gordon, Edwin, Elizabeth, and an infant ; Law- 
rence, who was married June 27, 1907, to Alice Clarke, daughter of C. C. 
Clarke, a prominent business man of Ironton, and has one child, Rolston 
C. ; Henrj-, and Frank, who are single and reside with their parents; and 
two children who are deceased. 

Fra.xk F. Phillips. The active ])usiness life of Frank F. Phillips 
has ])een connected with the most important period in the development 
of Ironton and is linked Avith the founding of one of those industries 
whieh have stimulated the city's growth and have been the basis of its 
manufacturing prestige. His is a career eminentlj'^ worthy of emula- 
tion. Commencing life in practical obscurity and modest circumstances, 
laboring in humble positions with steady industry, and practicing econ- 
omy and so])riety, at length he has seen his arduous etforts l)ear fruit 
and has profited beyond the fortunes of most men in the value whicli a 
growing community confers upon a fortunate location. 

Frank F. Phillips was born in Pike County, Ohio, October 7, 1873, 
and is a son of John and Harriet (Moore) Phillips. Jolin Phillips was 
})orn at Lancaster, Ohio, in 1813, and in young manhood learned the 
trade of blacksmith, which he was following at the outbreak of the Civil 
war, when he enlisted for sei'vice in the Thirty-third Regiment. Ohio Vol- 
uiiteci- Infantry. After comiilcting a very creditalile military service. 



676 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Mr. Phillips returned to his Ohio home and again engaged at his trade, 
but in 1873 came to the Hanging Roek Region, establishing the Phillips 
Buggy Works, on South Second Street, Ironton, of which his son, Frank 
F., is now the owner. Mr. Phillips continued to be connected with this 
business during the remaining years of his life, and died in July, 1910. 
He became a substantial and influential citizen of his community, took 
an interest in its advancement and welfare, and won the respect and 
esteem of his fellow-citizens through a life characterized by industry and 
integrity. The mother, who was born at Lancaster, Ohio, in 1847, died 
in February, 1912. There were five children in the family : Maggie R., 
who is deceased; Harry L., John H., Frank F., and Walter M. 

The primary schools of Ironton furnished Frank F. Phillips with his 
early education, but when fourteen years of age laid aside his school 
books to enter his father's carriage factory, which business he has con- 
tinued to be connected with to the present time. In 1910, at his father's 
death, he was made manager of the plant, and July 1, 1913, became sole 
owner thereof when he purchased the interests of the other heirs in the 
business. Possessing in large degree the energetic and entei'prising 
traits of his father's character, he has continued to make the venture a 
successful and paying one, and his activities have resulted in broadening 
the scope and nature of the business. The plant is valued in the neigh- 
borhood of $15,000, having modern n^achinery and equipment, and the 
pi-oduct of the factory is of such excellent character that Phillips buggies 
are known all over the state. Mr. Phillips is a member of the Chamber of 
Commerce and has taken an active and interested part in the movements 
which have made for Ironton 's advancement along the lines of education 
and religion. With his family, he attends the First Methodist Episcopal 
Church. He is independent in his political views. 

Mv. Phillips was married ]May 15, 1912, at Ironton, to INIiss Beulah 
Wyatt, daughter of Joseph and ^Nlary AVyatt, and to this union there has 
come one son, Frank F., Jr. Mr. Phillips is a member of the Benevolent 
and Protective Order of Elks, but is essentially a home man and there 
spends practically all of his leisure time. 

Nathaniel K. ]Moxley, ]M. D. The best criterion by which to judge 
the technical ability and personal popularity of any physician and sur- 
geon is that afforded in the extent and importance of the practice con- 
trolled by him, and from this viewpoint Dr. Moxley is to be designated 
with all consistency as one of the representative members of his profes- 
sion in the Hanging Rock Iron Region. He is engaged in active general 
practice in the City of Ironton, has a substantial and representative 
clientage and is a citizen whose genial personality and intrinsic civic 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 677 

loyalty have gained to him iuviolable place in popular esteem in his 
native city and county, where his status renders impossible any applica- 
tion of the aphorism that "a prophet is not without honor save in his 
own country. ' ' 

Doctor Moxley was born at Ironton, Lawrence County, on the 18th 
of May, 1860, a date that indicates that the family name became identified 
with the history of this section of the Buckeye State more than half a cen- 
tury ago. He is a son of Dr. Nathaniel K. Moxley, Sr., and Sophia 
(McConnell) Moxley, the former of whom was born in Tunbridge, Orange 
County, Vermont, on the 8th of February, 1818, and the latter of whom 
was born in Scioto County, Ohio, in 1829. The senior Doctor JMoxley 
came to Ohio in 1843 and in 181:7 he became a pioneer physician in 
Scioto County, where his marriage was solemnized in the following year. 
In 1852 he removed with his family to Ironton, where he became a promi- 
nent and honored representative of his profession and achieved high 
reputation as one of the able physicians and surgeons of this part of the 
state. Loved by all who had come within the sphere of his influence, 
this sterling pioneer continued his residence in Ironton until his death, 
in 1895, his widow surviving him by a decade and being summoned to tlie 
life eternal in 1906. Dr. Nathaniel K. Moxley, Sr., served many years 
as a member of the board of school examiners for Lawrence County, was 
county physician during the period of the Civil war, and was affiliated 
with the Masonic fraternity and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
The names of both him and his noble wife merit enduring place on the 
roll of the honored pioneers of Ironton, which was a mere village when 
they here established their home. Of the four children the eldest is 
Miss Alice ^1., who still resides in Ironton ; Clara A. is the wife of Harry 
Kinkade, of ^Marysville, Union County ; Nathaniel K., Jr., of this review, 
was the next in order of birth and his name is still enrolled on the list 
of eligible bachelors in Law^rence County ; and Lucy ^I., likewise un- 
married, maintains her home at Ironton. 

Dr. Nathaniel K. Moxley, Jr., continued to attend the Ironton public 
schools until he had completed the curriculum of the high school, in which 
he was graduated in 1878. In futherance of his plan to adopt the 
profession that had been signally dignified and honored by the services 
of his father, he was matriculated in the Miami Medical College, in the 
City of Cincinnati, and 'in this institution he was graduated as a member 
of the class of 1883, with the concomitant reception of the degree of 
Doctor of Medicine. During the long intervening period of more than 
thirty years the doctor has been engaged in the practice of his profes- 
sion in Ironton, where he has not only malintained but added new laurels 
to the professional reputation of the name which he bears. He has given 



678 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

special attention to the diagnosis and treatment of the diseases of chil- 
dren, in which branch of professional work he has been most successful 
and is a recognized authority, no attention having been given by him to 
surgical work since the earlier period of his professional career. He 
has served for a total of seven years as county coroner, having been 
the incumbent at diflferent intervals, and for eight years he was retained 
in the office of city health officer of Ironton, his labors having been 
admirable in the promotion of sanitary conditions and measures and 
thus in safeguarding the health of the community. He is actively 
identified with the Lawrence County Medical Society, the Ohio State 
Medical Society and the American Medical Association, besides which he 
is serving as a member of the Board of United States Pension Exam- 
ining Surgeons for Lawrence County. 

Doctor Moxley is found aligned as a stanch supporter of the prin- 
ciples of the republican party, is a member of the Congregational Church, 
holds membership in the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, and is a life 
member of Ironton Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, 
of which he has served as exalted ruler. The doctor has become widely 
knoAvn throughout this section of Ohio and it may consistently be said 
that his circle of friends is limited only by that of his acquaintances. 

Victor E. Krell. There can be no measure of inconsistency in 
referring to the line of enterprise of which Mr. Krell is an able and 
popular representative as one of the "public utilities" in the City of 
Ironton, where he is a member of the firm of Klein & Krell, engaged in the 
bak-^ry business, with an establishment that is essentially modern in all 
equipments and facilities and that caters to a large and appreciative 
patronage in the Iron City, the thriving metropolis of the Hanging Rock 
Iron Region. Mr. Krell has proved himself an enterprising and substan- 
tial business man of Ironton and his success is the more gratifying to 
note by reason of the fact that he has achieved the same entirely through 
his own efforts, the while he has so guided and governed his course as to 
merit and receive the unequivocal confidence and good will of those with 
whom he has come in contact in the various relations of life. 

Born in Germany, on the 22d of June, 1870, Victor E. Krell was the 
fourteenth in order of birth in a family of fifteen children, and he was 
but five years old when both of his parents died, in 1875, their entire lives 
having been passed in their native land, where the father was a teacher. 
Mr. Krell is a son of Jacob and Amelia (Helfrich) Krell, and of the 
family he is one of the children who have established homes in the United 
States. After the death of his parents Mr. Krell was reared by his 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 679 

elder brothers and sisters and afforded the advantages of the schools of 
the Fatherland until he had attained to the age of fourteen years, his 
studies having included a course in the gymnasium, the practical German 
equivalent of the American high school. Not a little courage, self- 
reliance and youthful enthusiasm must have been manifested by Mr. Krell 
when, as a lad of fourteen years, he severed the ties that bound him to 
home and native land and came valiantly to the shores of America, with 
the determination to win for himself success worthy of the name — the 
success of independence and usefulness. He established his residence in 
the Oity of Cincinnati, Ohio, soon after his arrival in the United States, 
and there he served a thorough apprenticeship to the baker's trade, in 
all phases and details of which he is now a recognized authority. He 
was employed as a journeyman at his trade, principally in Cincinnati, 
until 1911, when he formed a partnership with Frederick J. Klein, under 
the firm name of Klein & Krell, and founded the present bakery busi- 
ness conducted by them with marked success. The firm have augmented 
their facilities with the increasing expansion of their business and the 
products of their well appointed establishment constitute its best adver- 
tising medium, the while both of the interested principals have a secure 
place in the confidence and esteem of their many patrons. Mr. Krell has 
been an assiduous worker, believes in work and knows the value of 
work. Such are the men to w^hom success is a natural prerogative, and 
such are the citizens who foster general progress and prosperity in any 
community. 

While essentially loyal and appreciative as a citizen of the United 
States, Mr. Krell has been satisfied to maintain himself virtually inde- 
pendent of strict partisan dictates in politics and has supported the men 
and measures approved by his judgment. Both he and his wife are devout 
communicants of the Catholic Church and in Ironton they are members 
of the parish of St. Joseph's Church. Mr. Krell has identified himself 
fully and without reservation with the spirit of American customs and 
institutions, but he naturally has an abiding affection for and apprecia- 
tion of the land of his nativity, and he has indulged himself in five dif- 
ferent visits to the old home in Germany since he established his resi- 
dence in the United States. 

In his advancing march toward the goal of success and prosperity 
^Ir. Krell has not been self-centered or selfish, as shown by the fact that 
he has shared his lot with one who has proved a devoted companion and 
helpmeet. On the 15th of June, 1904, was solemnized his marriage to 
Miss Katie Margaret Klein, daughter of Conrad and IMargaret Klein, 
who were then residents of Portsmouth, Scioto Countv, but who now 



680 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

iiiaiiitain their home in Ironton, their sou Frederick J. being senior 
member of the firm of Klein & Krell. Mr. and Mrs. Krell have five chil- 
dren — George AViiford, Klein Charles, Martha Amelia, May Zita, and 
Victor Joseph. 

Edward F. Hannan. With all of consistency may this publication 
enter a memorial tribute to the late Edward Francis Hannan, vv^ho 
wielded potent influence in connection with civic and business affairs in 
Lawrence County and whose life was guided and governed by the loftiest 
principles of integrity and honor. His character was the positive ex- 
pression of a strong and noble nature, and he accounted well to himself 
and to the world, with the achievemejit that marked him as a man 
of superior ability and foresight. He was a native of Lawrence County 
and a repi-esentative of an honored pioneer family of the Hanging Rock 
Region, his having been the distinction of becoming eventually one of 
the most prominent and successful merchants and most popular and 
influential citizens of Ironton, in which city he died on Friday morn- 
ing, September 19, 1913. The entire community manifested its deep 
sense of personal loss and bereavement when he passed forward to the 
life eternal, and it is well to perpetuate in a preliminary way quotations 
from an obituary published in an Ironton newspaper at the time of 
the death of IMr. Hannan, but slight change being made in the quoted 
context : 

"With the departure of the clouds of night on Friday morning, the 
soul of Edward Francis Hannan, one of Ironton 's most prominent citi- 
zens, departed from the pain-wracked body, a few minutes after six 
o 'clock. Mr. Hannan 's death had been expected for a number of weeks, 
and some time ago the family was informed by specialists that there was 
no chance for his recovery. He was afflicted with a peculiar and baffling 
throat disease, against which the skill of the best physicians of the 
country was unable to combat successfully. He had undergone opera- 
tions, but without avail. Despite the fact that death was expected, 
when the end of the life of this noble man was announced by the tolling 
of the chimes of St. Lawrence church, it came as a shock to his many 
friends and relatives throughout the city, and occasioned general regret, 
for all who knew I\Ir. Hannan, either in a personal or business way, 
have only the highest praise for him, — for honesty and uprightness 
were the prime factors in his life and won for him an enviable reputation 
as a business man whose honor and integrity were unquestioned." 

Edward Francis Hannan was born at Vesuvius Furnace, Lawrence 
Count}', Ohio, on the 12th of July, 1860, and, as has been written, "his 
death, at the age of fifty-three years, cut him off in the prime of his man- 




f.c^y/^ 



t2^^2^^t^/iytyt^ 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 681 

hood and at the height of a successful business career." He was a 
son of John and Bridget (McDerniott) Hannan, both natives of Ireland, 
where the former was born in the year 1821 and the latter in 1824. The 
parents passed the closing years of their lives in Ironton, where the 
father died in 1893, the devoted wife and mother having been sum- 
moned to eternal rest in 1890 ; they became the parents of seven children, 
of whom Edward F. was the only son and the sixth in order of birth. 
The parents were reared and educated in their native land, where their 
marriage was solemnized, and upon their immigration to the United 
States they became pioneer settlers in the Hanging Rock Iron Region of 
Ohio, where John Hannan became actively identified with iron mining 
and the operation of iron furnaces. In 1876 he removed witli his family 
to the City of Ironton, where he engaged in the retail grocery business, 
with which his only son soon became associated, and with this line of 
enterprise he continued to be identified until the close of his life, which 
was one of unswerving integrity and earnest application, both he and 
his wife having been communicants of the Catholic Church. 

The public schools of the Vesuvius District of Lawrence County 
afforded to Edward F. Hannan his early educational privileges and he 
was sixteen years old at the time of the family removal to Ironton, where 
he continued his studies about one year in the high school. He then 
became actively associated with his father in the grocery business, and 
to this line of enterprise he continued to pay allegiance to the time of 
his demise. He developed a large and prosperous wholesale and retail 
grocery trade, and from 1881 until his death his business was established 
at the corner of Third and Railroad streets. The passing years brought 
increasing success and definite prosperity to Mr. Hannan, and he showed 
his progressiveness and civic loyalty by giving his capitalistic and 
executive support to many other representative business concerns in his 
native county, where he was a stockholder and director in a number of 
important corporations. 

With inviolable place in popular confidence and esteem and known 
as a citizen of ability and worth, Mr. Hannan was naturally called upon 
to serve in various positions of public trust. He served for a total 
of nine years as a valued member of the city council of Ironton and in 
this connection exerted potent influence in the furtherance of wise and 
progressive administration of municipal affairs, as did he likewise during 
his eight years' membership on the city board of public safety. He was 
one of the prominent and active members of the Ironton Chamber of 
Commerce, was a democrat in his political allegiance, and was a most 
zealous and devout communicant of St. Lawrence Catholic Church, as 
is also his widow. He was most active and liberal in the support of the 



682 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

various activities of this parish and served many years as treasurer of 
the church organization. J\Ir. Hannan was for ten years president of the 
local organization of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and thereafter was 
its treasurer for four years, besides which he was in close affiliation 
with the Knights of Columbus, the Knights of St. George, and the 
Young Men's Institute. 

At the home of the bride's parents, in the City of Ironton, on the 
8th of September, 1886, was solenniized the marriage of .Mr. Hannan 
to ]\Iiss Anna C. Goldcamp, and thus was formed an ideal companion- 
ship that was severed only when death set its seal upon his mortal lips. 
Mrs. Hannan was born in Lawrence County, on the 15th of January, 
1866, and is a daughter of the late John S. Goldcamp, an honored and 
intiuential citizen and pioneer to whom a .special memoir is dedicated 
on other pages of this work. jMrs. Hannan still resides in the beautiful 
home which was provided by her honored husband and which is endeared 
to her by many hallowed memories and associations and as the gracious 
chatelaine of which she has made it a center of most charming hospitality. 
Concerning the four children of ]\Ir. and Mrs. Hannan brief' record is 
given in conclusion of this memorial tribute to a man whose name and 
memory shall long be revered and honored in Ironton and throiighout 
the county which always represented his home and which he dignified 
by his character and services: Olivia H. is the wife of Richard ^Ic- 
]\Iahon, who is successfully engaged in the practice of law in the City 
of Washington, D. C. ; Lawrence J. remains with his widowed mother 
and is one of the representative young business men of Ironton ; and at 
the family home are also to be found the younger daughters, Monica 
N. and Elizabeth G. Mr. and Mrs. ^McMahon have two children, Julia 
Anna and ^lay Elizabeth, who are the only representatives in the third 
generation of the Hannan family in America. 

The funeral of Mr. Hannan was held at St. Lawrence Churcli on 
the Monday following his death, and called forth a large concourse of 
citizens of all classes — all desiring to pay this last tribute of respect and 
sorrow. The requiem mass was sung by Rev. James H. Cotter, D. D., 
a priest who had been a most intimate friend of the deceased, and 
interment was made in beautiful Sacred Heart Cemetery. Five of his 
sisters survive IMr. Hannan. 

John S. Goldcamp. It was well within the province of the ambition 
and individual powers of the late John S. Goldcamp to give to the world 
assurance of large and worthy achievement and to so order his course 
as to leave a reputation untarnished and a memory that is revered by 
those who came within the compass of his generous and kindly influence. 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 683 

Mr. Goldcamp was a native of Ohio and a representative of one of the 
honored pioneer families of this favored commonwealth, which it was 
given him to dignify and honor by his character and achievement. 
He was one of the prominent and influential citizens of Ironton, the 
metropolis and capital of Lawrence County, for many years prior to his 
death, which here occurred on March 5, 1909. In according to him a 
brief tribute in this publication it is found expedient to reproduce the 
gracious estimate published in an Ironton newspaper at the time of his 
death, but in perpetuating the article certain paraphrase and minor 
eliminations are indulged, to make the data more nearly in consonauce 
with the specific functions of this history. 

"Death is, indeed, laying a heavy hand upon Ironton, and is gather- 
ing many of her most prominent, honorable and influential citizens. 
The last to be laid low by the Grim Reaper, who is no respector of age 
or person, was John S. Goldcamp, whose name was known throughout 
the city as a synonym of honesty, sobriety, industry and all that the 
term 'good citizenship' implies. His eyes closed in everlasting sleep 
Tuesday night, at flve minutes past ten o'clock, and the end came as 
peacefully and sweetly as could be. As gently as the breath of spring 
his pure spirit fled his weary body, and, with scarcely a noticeable throb, 
his big heart was stilled — and John S. Goldcamp was no more. "When 
the final summons came, his bedside was surrounded by his devoted 
wife and his loving children, with their wives and husbands, a suitable 
end for one who loved his family as did he. What a genuine sorrow 
this announcement will cause throughout the city! John S. Goldcamp 
was a man honored and respected by all and was a citizen whom the 
city can ill afford to lose. 

"While Mr. Goldcamp 's death will cause universal regret through- 
out Ironton and Lawrence county, it came not as a surprise, for he 
had been in impaired health for the past five years and his condition had 
been most grave for the last week. His death was due to diabetes. 

"John Stephen Goldcamp was born at Pine Grove, Gallia county, 
Ohio, on the 15th of May, 1840, and resided there until he reached 
manhood's estate. On the 12th of February, 1861, he was united in 
marriage to Miss Mary Elizabeth Frische, who was spared to care for 
hiniL during his declining years as only a true and loving wife can. In 
1862 Mr. Goldcamp and his family removed to Ironton, where he resided 
until his death, save for one year passed at Lawrence Furnace. When 
Mr. Goldcamp came to Ironton he was employed as a contractor for 
shipping iron, but later he succeeded his father in the milling business. 
In March, 1887, Mr. Goldcamp organized the Goldcamp Milling Com- 
pany, of which he was president and a director from its inception until 



684 IIAXGLXG ROCK IRON REGION 

his death. lie was also president and a director of the Hannan-Cowden 
Dry Goods Company, the name of which was changed to the Bauer Dry 
Goods Company only a few days prior to his death. For many years 
Mr. Goldcamp was a member of the directorate of the First National 
Bank of Ironton and he was closely connected with and financially 
interested in many of the city's proniinent business and industrial 
enterprises. 

"Mr. Goldcamp had no political aspirations, being content to do 
what he could for his fellow ^citizens in his own quiet, unassuming way, 
but, in deference to the wishes of his friends, he served for six years as 
a member of the city council, with credit to himself and the municipality. 
He was a Democrat in his political adhereney and was a zealous com- 
municant and liberal supporter of St. Joseph Catholic church, where 
his funeral services were held." 

The widow of ^Ir. Goldcamp still survives him and is one of the 
loved and gracious women of Ironton. Of the twelve children nine are 
living — Frank, F. J. and Mrs. Edward F. Ilannan, of Ironton ; Mrs. 
James M. McJoint, of Norwood, a suburb of the City of Cincinnati, 
Ohio; Mrs. Hugh J. Loder, John X. and .Mrs. Fred U. McPherson, of 
Iron Gate, Virginia ; Mrs. William D. Crossing, of Columbus, Ohio ; 
and Miss Victoria, who remains at tlie old homestead with her widowed 
mother. 

John II. Lynd. As proprietor of tlie flourishing and incidentally 
important enterprise conducted under tlie title of the Lynd Transfer 
and Storage Company, with headquarters at 140 South Fourth Street, 
the popular citizen whose name initiates this paragraph is recognized 
as one of the progressive and representative l)usiness men of the younger 
generation in his native City of Ironton, Lawrence County. Here he 
was born on the 6th of December, 1882, and he is a representative of 
a family whose name has been long and prominently identified with the 
civic and material afPairs of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio. 

^Ir. Lynd is a son of Benjamin F. and Margaret (Brewster) Lynd, 
the foriner of wliom was born at Burlington, Lawrence County, on the 
7th of January, 1861, and the latter of whom was born in the City of 
Louisville, Kentucky, in 1864, tlie suliject of this review lieing the eldest 
of the three children and the other two lieing Carl and Ilerliert. The 
parents are prominent and honored residents of Ironton, where the father 
was engaged in the grocery business for thirty years and where he has 
lived practically retired since 1913. Jolm II. Lynd attended the public 
schools of Ironton until he had attained to the age of eighteen years, 
and thus liis discipline included the curriculum of tlie high school. 



IIAXGIXG KOCK IRON KEGIOX 685 

After leaving school he was clerk in the grocery establishment of his 
father until he gained the dignity iuqDlied in arrival at his legal majority, 
when he entered the employ of the Ironton Portland Cement Company, 
for which he was mine superintendent for seven years. 

In 1911 Mr. Lynd purchased the establishment and business of the 
Wieteki Transfer Company and he has since conducted a general trans- 
fer and storage business of most successful order, effective service and 
his personal popularity having contributed materially to the expansion 
and specially substantial status of the enterprise, the incidental equip- 
ment and stock of horses being conservatively valued at $9,000. Mr. 
Lynd is the owner also of his pleasant home, besides other i^esidenee 
property in his native city. He is affiliated with the local lodges of the 
Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, was 
for three years a member of the commissary department of the Seventh 
Regiment of the Ohio National Guard, and both he and his wife are com- 
municants of the Protestant Episcopal Church. 

On the 16th of October, 1907, was solemnized the marriage of Mv. 
Lynd to Miss Alice Richards, daughter of William and Clara (Thomp- 
son) Richards, of Ironton, her father having been for fifteen years 
manager of one of the leading iron furnaces in Lawrence County and 
otherwise prominently identified with the iron industry in the Hanging 
Rock Region. Mr. and ^Irs. Lynd have two children — p]ioise E. and 
Richard Franklin. 

Jexken a. Joxes. It has been the privilege of Jenken A. Jones, of 
Ironton, to realize many of his worthy ambitions, and through the exer- 
cise of business sagacity and good judgment to wrest from his oppor- 
tunities .financial and general success. As the proprietor of a flourishing 
feed and produce store he is contributing to the community a conserva- 
tive and well-established business, in the management of wliich he has 
followed the most upright methods, and his good citizenship has been 
made manifest on a number of occasions when the welfare of the city 
and its people has been at stake. 

Mr. Jones was born in Perry Township, on his fatiier's farm in 
Gallia County, Ohio, July 13, 1872, and is a son of David N. and Jane 
(Davis) Jones, both natives of that township. The father, although now 
sixty-six years of age, is still carrying on extensive agricultural opera- 
tions and is known as one of the substantial citizens of Perry Township, 
where he has served as assessor for several years. Mrs. Jones died in 
1909, at the age of fifty-one years. There were four children in the 
family of David N. and Jane Jones, namely: Thomas, who is a well- 
known contractor and builder of the village of Patrick, Gallia Countv: 



686 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

John E., who is engaged in farming on the old homestead in Perry 
Township; Jenken A., of this review; and Bert D., who is also a farmer 
of Perry Township. 

The boyhood of J. A. Jones was passed on his father's farm in Perry 
Township, and there he worked during the summer months while secur- 
ing his education in the district schools during the winter terms. He 
remained under the parental roof as his father's assistant until reacliing 
the age of twenty-six years, at which time he turned his attention to 
contracting in Gallia and Jackson counties and was so engaged four years, 
when he purchased a saloon at Gallipolis, and this he conducted tliree 
years. Succeeding this he had an experience of one year in the produce 
business at Gallipolis, and in 1908 became the candidate of the republi- 
can party for the office of sheriff' of Gallia County, to which hi' was 
elected. A term characterized by faithful and capable service won him 
re-election to the shrievalty in 1910, and when his second term expired 
he came to Ironton and bought the produce and feed business estalilislied 
here by Mr. ]McNickles. INIr. Jones had as a partner IMr. Gates, and the 
business was conducted under the firm style of Jones & Gates until 191:^ 
when he bought his partner's interest, and since that time has carried 
on the business alone as J. A. Jones. The business has enjoyed a pleasing 
and satisfactory growth, and is now valued at $9,000, attracting its trade 
from all over this part of Lawrence County. As a business man ^Ir. 
Jones is known to be progressive, capable and enterprising, making the 
most of his opportunities and meeting all engagements faithfully. He 
is a valued member of the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen of tlie 
World, the Modern Brotherhood of America and the Fraternal Order 
of Eagles, in all of which he has warm and appreciative friends. He is 
a member of the Baptist Church and has lieen liberal in his support of 
its movements. j\Ir. Jones is the owner of a nice home and six acres of 
valuable property at Gallipolis. 

On February 7, 1897, Mr. Jones was married at Patriot, (iallia 
County, Ohio, to Miss Ethel Carter, daughter of A. J. Carter, of that 
place, and two children have been born to this union : Victor and 
Margaret. 

George A. Meyers. Though he has passed the psalmist's span of 
three score years and ten, ]Mr. Me.yers is signally vigorous and alert and 
is active in business in the City of Ironton, Lawrence County, where 
he has long been an honored and influential figure in civic and Inisiness 
affairs and where abiding popular esteem is his grateful portion. 

Mr. Meyers was born in Germany, on the 5th of April. 1839, and lie 
has been a resident of Ironton for more than half a centui'y and where 



HAxNGING ROCK IRON REGION 687 

he is now successfully conducting a general plumbing business, with well 
e(iuipped headquarters at 18 South Third Street. To him must be 
accorded enduring honor for the gallant service given by him as a 
soldier of the Union in the Civil war, and in the "piping times of peace" 
his course has been characterized by the same intrinsic loyalty that 
l)rompted him to go forth and battle for a righteous cause. Mr. Mey- 
ers is a son of John J. and Christina (Roelky) Meyers, who, in the Ger- 
man Fatherland, were born respectively in the years 1817 and 1800. 
The father was a weaver by trade and also had much ability as a musi- 
cian. He came with his family to America in the year 1844 and he 
attained to the patriarchal age of ninety years, his death occurring in 
the year 1907, his wife having been summoned to the life eternal in 
1881, at the age of eighty-one years. They became the parents of six 
children — Charles H., George A., Christopher P. B., Herman L., Edward 
F. and Mary Elizabeth. 

Upon immigrating to the United States, John J. Meyers established 
liis home at Frederick City, Maryland, where he found employment at 
his trade, his career in America having been marked by earnest and con- 
secutive industry and the closing period of his life having been passed 
in Ohio. 

At Frederick City, Maryland, George A. Meyers was reared to the 
age of seventeen years, he having been about five years old at the time 
when the family came to the United States. He attended the common 
schools of the locality and period and from his boyhood was associated 
with his father in work at the weaver's trade, at varying intervals, until 
he severed the home ties and came to Ohio," in 1857. He established his 
residence at Ironton, which was then but a village, though the center 
of considerable manufacturing and other activities in connection with 
the iron industry. He worked in the roller mills about three months 
and then entered upon an apprenticeship to the machinist's trade, in the 
works of the Olive Foundry and Machine Company, with which he 
remained four years. 

At this juncture in his career Mr. ^leyers put aside all other consid- 
erations to tender his aid in defense of the Union. In response to 
President Lincoln's first call for volunteers, he enlisted as a private in 
Company A, Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, his being the first 
company to leave Ironton. under the three months' term of enlistment. 
The company was assigned to the work of guarding the Baltimore & 
Ohio Railroad, in West Virginia, and Mr. Meyers continued in service 
until the expiration of his term, when he received his honorable dis- 
charge, on the ]9th of August, 1861. The memories of the climacteric 



688 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

period of tine Civil war are by him vitalized through his affiliation with 
the Grand Army of the Republic. 

After the close of his military career ]\Ir. Meyers returned to Iron- 
ton, and here he worked as machinist in charge of the old-time railroad 
locomotives until 1873, when he became associated with two other skilled 
mechanics in the establishing of a machine shop, under the iirm name 
of J. H. Fisher & Company. He continued an active member of this 
firm until 1876, when he again entered railroad service, and was over- 
seer of the round house for nearly twenty years, these relations being 
severed in 1894, when he felt that advancing age entitled him to less 
exacting occupation. In the year mentioned, Mr. Meyers purchased the 
plumbing business of the Cricher Brothers, and he has since continued 
the enterprise successfully, his fine mechanical ability and personal 
popularity having gained to him a substantial and appreciative sup- 
porting patronage. 

In politics Mr. Meyers is a stalwart in the camp of the republican 
party and he served eleven years as a member of the city waterworks 
board. 

On the I'Oth of June, 1866, w'as solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Mej'ers to JMiss Margaret C. McKeun, daughter of Patrick and Rebecca 
McKeun, of Ironton, and of the eight children of this union five are liv- 
ing, — John G., Mary R., George P., Frederick W. and Samuel E. The 
names of those deceased were : Charles E., Florence and Emma. George 
P. is married and is employed as locomotive engineer on the line of the 
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railroad, with headquarters in the City 
of Cincinnati, where he maintains his home. Samuel E. is now a resi- 
dent of New York City. Frederick W., who is engineer at the Ironton 
waterworks, married ]\Iiss Caroline Rudd and they have five children. 
Mary R., the eldest of the children, is the wife of Charles A. Woodworth, 
engaged in the insurance business, and they reside at Suffern, Rockland 
County, New York. 

Harry Wileman, senior member of the brick manufacturing and 
general contracting firm of Wileman & Helbling, has for many years 
been prominently identified with the building interests of Ironton, and 
has been the architect of his own fortune as well. The struggle to rise 
from modest circumstances to affluence has been his, and his career has 
been characterized by unfaltering perseverance, strong determination 
and great energy. Mr. Wileman was born at Chelsworth, England, 
September 20, 1861, and is a son of James and :\Iary Ann (Wyard) 
Wileman. 

James Wileman was born in England in 1842, and on emigrating to 



HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 689 

the United States with his family settled first at Newport, Kentucky, 
from whence, in 1871, he removed to Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1873 he came 
to Ironton, where he followed the trade of brick mason for a number of 
years, and at this time is living a retired life. He has taken an interest 
in civic affairs and has served as alderman of the city for one term. Mrs. 
Wileman was born in England in 1840 and has been the mother of four 
children: Harry, Lucy, Ellen and Charles. Harry Wileman was edu- 
cated in the public schools of Cincinnati, Newport and Ironton, and at 
the age of sixteen years began to learn the trade of brick mason under 
his father. He worked at his trade from 1877 until 1892, and during 
this time rose to a foremanship in the employ of Witherow & Gordon, 
blast furnace contractors of country-wide reputation, and was in the 
Birmingham, Alabama, district for three years and in Chicago for eight 
months. In 1892, in partnership with John D. Helbling, he founded the 
brick manufacturing and genera] contracting firm of Wileman & Helb- 
ling, and this has since grown to large proportions, now owning a $7,000 
plant and controlling a large and representative business. Among the 
structures erected by this firm may be named the following : the Ketter 
Block, McMahon livery bam. Furlong Building, Eberts brewery, Fos- 
ter stove works. Central school building, and the Methodist Church 
edifices at Hanging Rock, Sedgwick and Ironton. Mr. AVileman is a 
thorough master of every detail of his business, and bears a high reputa- 
tion in commercial circles. He is a stockholder in the Ironton Athletic 
and Amusement Company, a director of the Home Building and Loan 
Company of Ironton and a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and in 
addition to his own residence, at No. 655 South Sixth Street, owns about 
fifteen vacant lots in Ironton. A republican in his political views, he 
has taken only a good citizen's interest in political matters. His frater- 
nal connection is with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his 
religious faith that of the Episcopal Church. In all respects he is a 
stirring, progressive man of his community, at all times ready to lend 
his co-operation to beneficial movements. 

Mr. Wileman was married November 15, 1883, at Wellston, Jackson 
County, Ohio, to Miss Ellen Cheuveront, daughter of T. M. Cheuveront 
and five children have been born to this union, namely : Frank, who is 
a brick mason, married Nellie Henry, daughter of I. N. Henry, of Iron- 
ton, and has four children. Garland, Nellie L., Genevieve C. and Harry 
N. ; Clifford, who is deceased; James M., a brick mason of Ironton, who 
married Eva Taylor and has one child, lantha ; Charles, who is deceased ; 
and Kathryn, who married Arthur Bester, a brick mason, and lives at 
Ironton. 



690 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

John W. Truby. In his native City of Ironton, the progressive and 
flourishing metropolis and judicial center of Lawrence County, Mr. 
Truby has found opportunity for the winning of success and popularity 
as a representative of business activities and as a loyal and apprecia- 
tive citizen. He is proprietor of the Truby Bottling Works, which rep- 
resents one of the prosperous business enterprises of Ironton, with the 
])est of facilities in all departments. 

Mr. Truby was born at Ironton on the 14th of September, 1870, and 
is a son of William W. and Henrietta (Taylor) Truby, both natives of 
Pennsylvania, where the former was born in 1835 and the latter in 1845, 
her birth having occurred in the City of Pittsburgh. William W. Truby 
became a resident of Ironton in 1868 and was long employed as a skilled 
artisan' in the manufacturing of nails, in one of the leading mills of 
Lawrence County. He passed the psalmist's span of three score years 
and ten and was a well known pioneer citizen of Ironton at the time 
of his death, in 1907, his wife surviving him by about six years and 
being summoned to eternal rest in 1913. They became the parents of 
five children, all of whom are living, namely: William W., Jr., Florence, 
Carrie, Henry and John W. 

John W. Truby attended the Ironton public schools until he had 
attained to the age of eighteen years and after completing his studies 
in the high school he was employed in a local nail mill for ten years, 
within which he became an expert workman and efficient mechanic. At 
the expiration of this decade, in 1900, he purchased the bottling works 
conducted by Charles Myers, and since that time he has greatly ex- 
panded the scope and importance of the enterprise, which is conducted 
under the title of the Truby Bottling AVorks, his energy and enter- 
prise having brought to him unequivocal success in his independent 
Imsiness operations. JMr. Truby is a stockholder in the Home Telephone 
Company of Ironton, and further evidences of his temporal prosperity 
are shown in his ownership of three business blocks in Ironton — one on 
Center Street, between Third and Fourth streets; anotlier on North 
Third Street ; and the third on South Third Street. He is a democrat 
in his political allegiance and he is an attendant and supporter of the 
Christian Church, of which his wife was a devoted member. 

On the 27th of November, 1899, ]\Ir. Truby wedded Miss Lucy Heider, 
daughter of August and Barbara Heider, of Ironton, and she entered 
into eternal rest in 1907, the two surviving children being Louise and 
Pauline. 

William O'Keefe. It has been within the compass of the ambition 
and powers of Mr. 'Keefe to gain secure status as one of the representa- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 691 

tive business men of his native City of Ironton, the metropolis and county 
seat of Lawrence County, and he is a scion of a family whose name has 
been worthily identified with the history of the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region for more than sixty years. He was formerly associated with 
his brother James in the undertaking business that is now conducted 
successfully under his personal direction, the widow of his brother still 
retaining an interest in the business and her son Charles being the 
valued assistant to his uncle, whose name initiates this paragraph. With 
the best of modern facilities and equipment, the establishment of Mr. 
O'Keefe is one of the best in the City of Ironton in the affording of 
effective and seemly service in the directing of funerals with unfailing 
sympathy and kindly consideration. 

^Ir. O'Keefe was born in Ironton on the 21st of October, 1856, at 
which time this now thriving industrial city was a mere village. He 
is a son of John and Mary (O'Hare) O'Keefe, both natives of Ireland — 
the father having been born in County Cork and the mother in County 
Clare and both having been reared intheir native land, where their mar- 
riage was solemnized. John O'Keefe, born in the year 1805, was sixty- 
nine years of age at the time of his death, which occurred at his old 
homestead in Ironton, in 1874. His widow survived him by nearly 
fifteen years and was sixty-five years of age at the time when she was 
summoned to the life eternal, in 1888, her birth having occurred in 1823. 
Concerning the children of this union the following brief record is con- 
sistently entered : Catherine is the widow of Daniel Boyce and maintains 
her home in Ironton ; James, who died in the year 1902, as senior member 
of tlie firm of O'Keefe & Haniehen, was one of the founders of the 
substantial undertaking business now conducted by his brother William, 
the enterprise dating its inception back to the year 1878 and being thus 
one of the pioneer business concerns of the city; Miss Margaret still 
resides in Ironton, and presides over the old family homestead, with her 
brother William, of this review, who likewise has remained unwed ; 
Thoma.s is a resident of Newport, Kentucky; Susan died as a child. 
John O'Keefe, the honored father, immigrated to the United States in 
1846 and after remaining for a time in the Dominion of Canada. he 
removed to Pennsylvania, from which state he came to Lawrence County. 
Ohio, in 1852, here to pass the residue of his life, which was one of 
unostentatious worth and consecutive industry. He was well known and 
held in high esteem in Lawrence County and served many years as street 
commissioner of Ironton. He was a democrat in his political proclivities 
and both he and his wife were zealous communicants of the Catholic 
Church, in which they early became members of the Ironton parisli of 
St. Lawrence. 

^■nl. TI-4 



692 HANGING KOCK IKON KEGION 

William 'Keef e continued to attend the schools of Lawrence County, 
parochial and public, until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, 
his educational discipline having been received principally in Ironton, 
though he attended school for a time at Kelley 's JMills, where the family 
resided for a comparatively brief period. At the age noted he obtained 
employment in the Star Mill, in Ironton, and in this manufactory of 
nails and other iron and steel products he served in the department 
devoted to the blueing of nails. After being identified with this line 
of enterprise for a period of five years Mr. O'Keefe became an assistant 
in the undertaking establishment of O'Keefe & Hanichen, and after the 
death of Mr. Hanichen, in 1887, he purchased the latter 's interest from 
the witlow and became his brother's partner in the business, this mutually 
grateful alliance continuing until the death of James O'Keefe, in 1902, 
since which time the enterprise has been continued by the latter 's widow 
and brother, William having the direct management of the business with 
Avhich he has been long identified and in connection with which he has 
become one of the substantial and infiuential business men of his native 
city. 

Essentially progressive and loyal as a citizen, Mr. O'Keefe has had 
no predeliction for the honors or emoluments of public office and in 
politics he maintains an independent attitude, his support being given 
to the men and measures meeting the approval of his judgment. He is 
an earnest communicant of the Catholic Church, as a member of St. 
Lawrence Church, and he is a member of the board of trustees of Sacred 
Heart Cemetery. Mr. O'Keefe is the owner of valuable residence prop- 
erty in Ironton, including the old homestead of his parents, on Lawrence 
Street. He is affiliated with the Knights of Columbus and the Ancient 
Order of Hibernians. His life has been guided by eai'nest principles 
and worthy ideals, so that he well merits the high esteem that is accorded 
to him in the county that has always represented his home. 

Fred B. Davies. As a general contractor ^Ir. Davies has built up 
a substantial and prosperous enterprise, and is numbered among the 
progressive and energetic business men of his native county, his residence 
and executive headquarters being maintained in the City of Ironton, the 
judicial center of the county, where his circle of friends is limited only 
by that of his acquaintances. 

]Mr. Davies was born at Pine Grove, Elizabeth Township, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, on the 10th of July, 1875, and is a son of George H. and 
Rachel (Brammer) Davies, the former of whom was born in England, 
in 1850, and the latter of whom was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, in 
1854, the father, Elijah Brammer, having been one of the sterling pioneers 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 693 

of this county. George H. Davies was reared and educated in his native 
land, whence he came to the United States in the year 1873, making 
Ironton, Ohio, his destination and here finding employment in the 
capacity of bookkeeper. Later he was chosen city clerk, and of this 
olifice he continued the etificient and valued incumbent for sixteen con- 
secutive years. In England he had held the position of railway station 
agent and he developed fine ability as an accountant and executive. 
For a time he held the post of timekeeper for the mines at Pine Grove, 
Lawrence County, and he now resides in Ironton, his cherished and 
devoted wife having passed to the life eternal in 1909. Of the seven 
children, Fred B., of this review, is the eldest; George L. is deceased; 
Minnie B. remains at the paternal home; ^Margaret E. married M. D. 
Henry and resides in Galesburg, Illinois; and Henry, Bessie and May 
died in infancy. The public schools of Ironton afforded Fred B. Davies 
his early educational advantages, and he continued his scholastic dis- 
cipline until he had attained to the age of seventeen years, when he 
entered upon an apprenticeship to the trade of kegmaker, in the works 
of the Belfort Iron Company, in the employ of which corporation he 
continued until 1892. Thereafter he was clerk in a dry-goods store in 
Irontoii until 1898, when he subordinated all other interests to serve in 
the Spanish-American war. He served eight months as hospital steward 
in the hospital of the First Division of the Second Army Corps, at 
Camp Alger, near Washington, D. C, and after receiving his honorable 
discliarge at Camp Meade, Pennsylvania, he resumed his clerical position 
in Ironton, where he continued to be thus engaged until 1890. He then 
went to Birmingham, Alabama, in which city he assumed the post of 
engineer for the Tennessee Iron & Coal Company, but eight months later, 
on account of the death of his brother, George L., he returned to Ironton. 
For two years thereafter he was a conductor on the street-railway lines 
of this city, and he was then appointed assistant to J. R. C. Bi'own, the 
chief engineer of the City of Ironton, Ohio. He retained this position 
eight years and then, in 1910, engaged in general contracting, to which 
he has since given his close attention and in connection with which his 
success has been unequivocal. In November, 1912, he was elected to the 
office of county surveyor of Lawrence County for a period of two years, 
beginning September 1, 1913, and in the August primary of 1914 was 
nominated for a second term without opposition. 

Mr. Davies accords unwavering allegiance to the republican party, is 
affiliated with the lodge and encampment of the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows, as well as with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protec- 
tive Order of Elks, and both he and his wife are members of the First 
Baptist Church. IMr. Davies is a man of fi)ie physique, and this fact 



694 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

has inured to his preferment as drum major of the U. S. W. V. Band, 
of Ironton. He is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is a 
loyal and appreciative citizen of Ironton, and is progressive and public- 
spirited. 

On the 2d of July, 1901, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Davies 
to ^liss Enola Bradley, of Catlettsburg, Kentucky, and they have three 
children — Georgia A., Enola B., and F. Herbert. 

Earl Gkiffith. Prominent among the capable officials of Lawrence 
County is found Earl Griffith, official court stenographer and reporter, 
a cai:)acity in which he has been favorably before the public for six years. 
Mr. Grififith was for several years a te'acher in the public schools of 
Lawrence County, and although still a young man has had wide experi- 
ence and training that fits him eminently for the duties of his office. He 
is a product of Lawrence County, having been born near Arabia, May 
21, 18S7, a son of Samuel D. and Louisa (Bradshaw) Griffith. 

.'^amuel D. Griffith was born at Sherritts P. 0., Lawrence County, 
about 185-1, and throughout his life has followed the trade of carpenter, 
at which he is still engaged at Arabia. He is well known in that town, 
where his reputation is that of a reliable and industrious man of business 
and a good and public-spirited citizen. I\Irs. Griffith was born at Arabia, 
Lawrence County, in 1856, and also survives, being the mother of seven 
children, namely : James L., Myrta, IMaude, George, Ernest E., Earl 
and Guy. 

The early education of Earl Griffith was secured in the Griffith School, 
situated in the vicinity of Arabia, which he attended until reaching the 
age of seventeen years. He then secured a license to teach, and for two 
years liad charge of the Bradshaw School, in the same locality, following 
which, realizing the need of further training, he entered the Davidson 
liusiness College at Ironton, and for one j'ear studied stenography and 
shorthand. In 1908 Mr. Griffith was appointed official court stenographer 
of Lawrence County, and was reappointed in 1911 and again in 1914, 
his present term expiring April 6, 1917. His career has "been char- 
acterized by efficient and faithful service, and his work has been entirely 
satisfactory to all connected with the court business of the county. Mr. 
(iriffith is a rapid operator and has made a thorough study of his voca- 
tion, and holds membership in the National Shorthand Reporters' Asso- 
ciation. Fraternally, he is connected with the ^iasons, lodge, chapter 
and council; the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks; the Knights 
of Pythias, and the Knights of the Golden ICagle. He has shown an 
interest in the welfare of Ironton and its indu.stries, and is an active 
mcinlicr of the Chamber of Connnerce. His political support is given 



HANGING ROCK IR(3N REGION 695 

to the republican party, and his religious connection is with the Baptist 
Church. Mr. Griffith is single. 

Percy W. Dean. Among the public officials of the Hanging Rock 
Region of Ohio who are steadfastly maintaining the excellence of service 
in their various departments is found Percy W. Dean, city auditor of 
Irenton, Lawrence County. Mr. Dean has just entered public life, this 
being his first official position, but he is well known as an active worker 
in the ranks of the republican party, and has an honorable record behind 
him in civic life. His election cam^e as a result of a desii'e of tlie 
people to secure an energetic, aggressive and stirring man in the city 
auditor's office, and IMr. Dean has up to date vindicated their confidence 
in him and there seems to be no reason that he will not continue to do so 
in the future. 

Percy W. Dean is a native son of Ironton, Ohio, and was l)orii 
December 31. 1880, his parents being William and Elvira (Silbaugh) 
Dean. The family is well known in Lawrence County and has lieen 
located here for many years. AVilliam Dean was born here in 1850, and 
during his career followed a variety of vocations, being at the time of 
his death a watchman. He passed away in 1907, a worthy man and 
good citizen. j\Ir. Dean was twice married ; first to Elvira Silliaugh, 
who was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1855, and died in 1893, and 
then to Olivia Lewis, who survived him and makes her home at Newport, 
Kentucky. To the first union there were born four children: Oscar, 
Percy W., Alary and Anna. There were no children born to the sec- 
ond union. 

Percy W. Dean was given good educational advantages in his 
youth, first attending the schools of Ilecka Furnace until he reached the 
age of sixteen years and then becoming a student in the high school at 
Ironton. Upon leaving the latter, he began to learn the trade of molder 
in stoves, and after mastering the details of this calling continued to 
work as a stove molder in Ironton until '1914. Through fidelity, energy 
and good workmanship, he won promotion from time to time, and in 
the meanwhile interested himself in republican politics, gaining a 
wider and wider influence among his fellow citizens until in 1913 he 
became his party's candidate for the office of city auditor. His popular- 
ity was shown by his election to that office in the fall of the same year, 
and in 1914 he laid aside other matters to take over the management 
of the city auditor's affairs. In his first experience as a city official 
he is living up to his promises made before his election, and the people 
have no reason to be discontented with his services. 

Mr. Dean was married at Ironton, August 24, 1902, to Miss ATaud 



696 HANGLXG ROCK IRON REGION 

Thomas, who was born in Logan County, Ohio, daughter of R. W. 
Thomas, a brick yard man of Ironton. Three children have been born 
to this union : Horace, Mary and Ivan. Mr. and Mrs. Dean attend the 
Pine Street Methodist Church, are well known in social and religious 
circles of the city, and have their own attractive residence. Mr. Dean 
is active in lodge work, being a member of the Fraternal Order of 
Eagles, the Knights of the Golden Eagle and the Iron Molders' Union, 
and finds his chief recreation in out-door sports. His acquaintance is 
wide and his friends are numerous among all classes of people. 

Homer ^I. Edwards. A young lawyer of Ironton who has done 
much to prove his ability and open a way for a large and successful 
career in the law. Homer ]M. Edwards was admitted to the bar and 
began practice in 1911, and had already by ten j-ears of successful work 
performed an important service in the field of education, and for nine 
years was a naember of the County Board of School Examiners of Law- 
rence County. 

Homer M. Edwards was born at Deering in Lawrence County, July 
1, 1884. His father, Meredith Edwards, was born at South Point in 
Lawrence County, June 10, 1852, is a substantial farmer who still lives 
near Deering. The mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Allen, rep- 
resents through her family one of the oldest settlers in Lawrence County. 
She was born at Deering in 1818 and died in 1906. Of their six chil- 
dren two died in infancy and the others are: Eftie, now ^hs. E. M. 
Stanly of Kittshill, Lawrence County; Charity, now IMrs. G. E. Harris 
of Coal Grove, Lawrence County ; Homer I\I. ; and John C., a resident 
of Ironton. 

Mr. Edwards is a product of the common schools of Lawrence 
County, finished the course of the high school at Coal Grove in 1901, 
and for eleven years was active in educational work. Three years 
after beginning his career as a teacher he was appointed to the office 
of examiner of county schools, and was principal for two years at 
South Point and then for three years superintendent of the schools at 
Coal Grove, and for two years was principal in the Ironton schools. Mr. 
Edwards graduated with the degree Ph.B. at Lebanon University in 
1908, and took his law studies in the Northern Ohio University at Ada, 
finishing with the degree LL.B. in 1911. Admitted to the bar in the same 
year, he began practice at Ironton, January 15, 1912, and has since 
enjoyed a growing and profitable general practice. 

Mr. Edwards is a Knight Templar I\Iason, and his other fraternities 
are the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Knights of the 
Golden Eagle and the ^lodern AVoodmen of xVmeriea. Ho is a trustee 



HAXGING ROCK IRON REGION 697 

of the Baptist Church and a member of the County Bar Association. For 
seven years in connection with other educational work he served as 
county school examiner. Outside of his profession, which al)sorbs prac- 
tically all his time and attention, Mr. Edwards finds his pleasure in 
hunting, and is the owner of a fine residence on Sixth Street in Ironton. 
He was married to Pansy B. Winters, of Ashland, Kentucky, on May 
28, 1914. 

Earl W. Kettek, clerk of the water works at Ironton, Ohio, is still 
a young man, but has had a varied and eventful career in which he 
has gained success through his own efforts and abilities. Wearing the 
uniform of his country when a mere lad, subsequently connected with 
various business enterprises of his community, a victim of the floods of 
1913, and eventually a successful city official and a prominent figure in 
the fraternal and athletic circles of his community— surely there has 
been enough of action in this young man's life to satisfy the most 
strenuously inclined. 

Mr. Ketter is a native son of Ironton, born July 17, 18S0, a son 
of Charles H. and Rosina (Duis) Ketter. His father, born in Scioto 
County, Ohio, in 1849, grew there to manhood and was married, not 
long after which he came to Lawrence County and, locating at Ironton, 
engaged in the commission business, a line in which he is now widely 
and prominently known. The mother was also born in Scioto County, 
and met her death in 1893, in an accidental manner, and Mr. Ketter sub- 
sequently married her sister, Anna Duis. Nine children were born to 
the first union : Lillian, George, Earl W., Harold, Otto, Helen, ^Nlabel, 
Ralph and Gladys, of whom Ralph is deceased. By the second union 
there were six children. 

Earl W. Ketter received his education in the public and higli schools 
of Ironton, and in the meantime assisted his father in the commission 
business, working industriously during vacations and spare times and 
mastering the details of the trade. He was less than eighteen years 
of age when the Spanish-American war broke out, but June 4, 1898, with 
other patriotic youths of his neighborhood, enlisted in Company E, 
Seventh Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantrj-, with which he marched 
off for the front. This organization, however, never left the United 
States, the war closing before it was called upon for active service, and 
^Ir. Ketter received his honorable discharge, November 6, 1898, and 
returned to his home. At that time he became a bookkeeper in his 
father's business, and continued as such until 1901, when he purchased 
an interest in the Ketter Clothing Company, acting as a clerk with this 
enterprise until 1909. Succeeding this, he turned his attention to the 



698 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

confectionery business, and was identified therewith until the flood of 
March, 1913, washed out his place of business and he then concentrated 
his energies upon his duties as clerk of the water works, a position to which 
he had been appointed in 1912. He has continued to handle the affairs 
of his office in an entirely satisfactory manner, and through his ener- 
getic and up-to-date methods has succeeded in introducing a number of 
needed reforms into the department. 

Mr. Ketter was married June 6, 1907, to Miss Anna J. Nauert, 
daughter of Herman Nauert, of Ridgeway, Pennsylvania, superintend- 
ent of the Ridgeway Dynamo and Engine Company. One child has 
been born to this union: Earl W., Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Ketter are mem- 
bers of the First Methodist Church, and in politics he is a republican. 
In April, 1903, he was appointed captain and regimental adjutant of 
the Seventh Ohio National Guards, under Col. C. A. Thompson, serving 
also as adjutant under Col. E. E. Corn, and Avas captain of commissary 
in 1907 at the time of his resignation. In 1906 Mr. Ketter assisted in 
' the organization of E. C. Smith Camp No. 28, Spanish-American War 
Veterans, of which he was elected quartermaster, and still holds that 
office. For some years Mr. Ketter has been greatly interested in athletics, 
particularly baseball, and through his earnest and skilled efforts the 
Ironton Club of the Ohio State League, of which he is manager and 
assistant secretary, has been developed into a speedy and hard-fighting 
organization. Mr. Ketter is popular with those M'ho know him in all 
walks of life, and few men have a wider circle of friends. 

William E. George. The fire department of any large and tliriv- 
ing community under modern organization and conditions is one of the 
most important in the municipal service, and to its management the 
directing head is called upon to bring high executive abilities, broad 
judgment, diplomatic powers and absolute fearlessness. These quali- 
ties are possessed in a high degree by AVilliam E. George, chief of the 
fire department of Ironton, who for a continuous period of thii'ty-two 
years has directed the work of the "fire eaters" of this prosperous and 
important City of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio. 

Chief George was born in Bath County, Kentucky, November 12, 
1847, and is a son of Robert and Drusilia (Raborn) George, natives of 
that county. The father was born in 1814, and was engaged in farming 
there until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he enlisted in the Eighty- 
first Regiment, Kentucky Infantry, and upon receiving his discliarge, 
in 1862, came to Scioto County, Ohio, and continued agricultural pur- 
suits until his death in 1883. ]\Irs. George, who was born in 1818, passed 
away in 1895, having been the mother of twelve children, four of wliom 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 699 

died in infancy, while the others were: Henry W. and Francis, wlio 
are deceased; Jane; Levina ; AVilliam E.; Alexander; Telitha, who is 
deceased; and John, deceased. 

The early education of AVilliam E. George was secured in the 
public schools of his native county, which he attended until he was four- 
teen years of age. At that time, with other youths of his neighborhood, 
he became a member of what was known as the "Squirrel Hunters," a 
youthful military organization, with which he was associated two years. 
After the family moved to Ohio, Mr. George attended the schools of 
Portsmouth until he reached the age of seventeen years, and at that 
time learned the machinist's trade, a vocation which occupied his atten- 
tion during the ensuing five years. Succeeding this, Mr. George became 
a buyer of stave lumber on the Ohio River, but after eighteen months 
went to Huntington, West Virginia, and embarked in mercantile pur- 
suits as the proprietor of a grocery establishitient, which, however, he 
sold one year later, at that time going to Gallipolis, Ohio. After two 
years in the business there, Mr. George came to fronton, and opened 
an establishment which he conducted with some success for three years, 
then selling out and becoming a member of the City Fire Department. 
He showed such executive ability that in 1882 he was made chief of the 
department, a position he has continued to hold to the present time. 
Although sixty-seven years of age. Chief George is a vigorous and wide- 
awake man, and promises to maintain the service of wliich he is the head 
at its past standard of superiority, and to continue to incorporate into 
the system the methods and improvements indicated by the advancement 
of science and mechanics. He is entitled to take a justifiable pride in 
his record as a fire-fighter. His men have the utmost confidence in his 
ability and trust him implicitly, knowing that he will never send them 
where he himself will not go. AVhile attending the fierce V\^ard Luml)er 
Mill fire, in 1911, Chief George lost his left eye, the extreme heat caus- 
ing infiammation which resulted in the loss of sight in that optic. 

Chief George was married April 21, 1871, at the home of "the bi-idi' 
in Niles Township, Scioto County, Ohio, to Miss Almeda Stover, daugh- 
ter of David Stover, a farmer of that locality, and to this union tliere 
have been born five children: Orval D., Alfred W., Nora J., AVilliam 
A'", and Edward E. Orval D., an electrician of fronton, married Elsie 
Conley, and has two children — Irene and Ralph ; Alfred M.. also an 
electrician of fronton, married Mattie Ferguson and has an adopted 
child — Emerson; Nora married Allen Thuma, superintendent of the 
Ohio Electric Company, of fronton, and has one adopted child — Alma; 
William Y.. an electrician at Ironton, married Jennie DcLong and has 



700 HAxN'GlXG ROCK IRON REGION 

one child — Alineta ; and Edward, also an electrician, is single and resides 
with his parents. 

Chief George is the owner of a comfortable residence in Ironton, 
and also has other realty, including six vacant lots. A republican in 
politics, his only public service outside that of fire-fighting was as post- 
master at Friendship, Scioto County, some forty years ago. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his 
religious affiliation is with the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Ralph W. Mountain. The responsible and exacting office of clerk 
of the courts has in Lawrence County an efficient and popular incumbent 
in the person of Mr. Mountain, who is a native of Ironton, the city in 
which he now maintains his home and official headquarters, and he is a 
representative of one of the well known and highly esteemed families 
of this section of the Buckeye State. 

Mr. Mountain was born in Ironton on the 9th of December, 1874, 
and is a son of Samuel and Margaret (Johnson) Mountain, the former 
of whom was born near Lexington, Lancaster Countj^ Pennsylvania, 
and the latter of whom was born at Aetna Furnace, Lawrence County, 
Ohio, in 1841. Samuel Mountain was reared and educated in ihe old 
Keystone State and as a young man was a successful teacher in the com- 
mon schools. He came to Ironton, Ohio, prior to the Civil war and 
became prominently identified with the iron industry in this section 
of the State, his death occurring, at Ironton; in 1876, when his son 
Ralph W., of this review, was a child of about two years. His widow 
survived him by nearly forty years and was summoned to the life eter- 
nal in 1913. Of their three children the second born is Harry, who is 
one of the representative business men of Ironton, where he is engaged 
in general contracting^ on an extensive scale. He served two terms 
as mayor of the city and is one of its influential citizens of marked 
public spirit and progressiveness. He wedded Miss Amelia Frost, who 
liad been a successful teacher of music, and they have no children. 
Ralph AY. was the third child, and the first born, Anna, died at the age 
of six years. 

To the pul)lic schools of liis native city Ralpli W. ^Mountain is 
indebted for his early educational discipline, and he continued his 
studies until he had completed, at the age of seventeen years, the cur- 
riculum of the higli school. Therenfter he was for four years in the 
employ of the Piedmont Luml)er Coini)any, and for twelve years after 
his severing his relations with this company he was a valued attache of 
the tie department of the New York Central Railroad Company, witli 
headciuarters at Cincinnati and Chicago. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 701 

After resumiug his association with local interests in Ironton 
Mr. Mountain held for two years the position of inspector for the 
Ironton water works, and he then became candidate, on the ticket of the 
newly organized progressive party, for the office of representative, in 
November, 1912. He was appointed clerk of courts at the death of the 
regular incumbent, and thus his service became consecutive when he 
assumed the office through regular election, in November, 1914. 

Mr. Mountain is essentially loyal to and appreciative of his home 
city, which is endeared to him by many gracious memories and associa- 
tions. He is progressive and public-spirited to a degree and has iden- 
tified himself with various enterprises that lend to the industrial and 
commercial prestige of his native city. He is a stockholder of the Iron- 
ton Portland Cement Company and the ]Marting Iron & Steel Company, 
owns a half-interest in the Lyric Theater Building, and is the owner also 
of his attractive residence property. Both he and his wife hold mem- 
bership in the Presbyterian Church and he is affiliated with the Benevo- 
lent and Protective Order of Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 

Prior to the Spanish- American war Mr. iMountain had been actively 
identified with the Ohio National Guard, as a member of which he en- 
listed for service in the conflict mentioned, his company being in active 
service until the close of the war when he was mustered out and received 
his honorable discharge. He thereafter continued his membership in 
the Seventh Regiment of the Ohio National Guard for several years, 
and he held the office of captain in the same until his retirement from 
active membership. He is affiliated with the Spanish-American War 
Veterans' Association. 

On the 6th of June, 1907, was solemnized the marriage of Captain 
Mountain to Miss Mary Alice Pixley, daughter of Charles L. Pixley, a 
representative business man of Ironton, and the children of this union 
are Jean C. and Ralph "W., Jr. 

Ephraim L. jMayberry. He whose name initiates this review is one 
of the popular young men and efficient officials of his native county, 
maintains his home in the City of Ironton, and is the incumbent of the 
position of assistant county surveyor. 

]Mr. ]Mayberry was born in Windsor Township, Lawrence County, on 
the 16th of September, 1880, and is a son of John a-nd Martha (Calli- 
flow^er) Mayberry, both likewise natives of Lawrence County, where the 
former was born in 1856 and the latter in 1861 — dates that indicate that 
the respective families were founded in this county in the pioneer days. 
John Mayberry received his education in the public schools and as a 
young man was a successful and popular teacher in the schools of Law- 



702 HANGLNG ROCK IRON REGION 

rcnce County. He and his wife now reside on their well improved farm 
in Windsor Township, and he is giving special attention to fruit cul- 
ture, having on his place a fine orchard of 5,000 apple trees. The four 
children are Bertha, Owen, Ephraim L. and Irwin. 

Ephraim L. Mayberry continued to attend the public schools of 
his native county until he had attained to the age of eighteen years, 
and thereafter he was for five years engaged in teaching, as one of the 
efficient and popular representatives of the pedagogic profession in Law- 
rence County. In 1905 he was graduated in the Noii:hwestern Ohio 
Normal University, at Ada, Hardin County, and from this institution 
he received the degree of civil engineer. Thereafter he was identified 
with government contract work on the Ohio and Allegheny rivers until 
1909, since which time he has held the position of deputy county surveyor 
of Lawrence County, an incumbency in which he has accomplished a 
large amount of important work. 

]\Ir. Mayberry renders allegiance to the republican party, he and his 
wife are members of the First Baptist Church of fronton, and he is 
affiliated with the local lodge and chapter of the Masonic fraternity. 

On the 16th of July, 1906, Mr. ]\Iayberry was united in marriage 
to Miss Grace Reed, daughter of John W. Reed, of Scottown, Lawrence 
Count}^, and their three children are John B., Bon E., and Joseph D. 

Allen L. Tiiuma. Developing his powers through practical experi- 
ence, ^Ir. Thuma has forged his way forward until he has achieved large 
and worthy success in his chosen field of endeavor, and he is recognized 
as one of the representative business men of the younger generation in 
the City of Ironton, the thriving metropolis and judicial center of 
Lawrence County. Through his own ability he has advanced to his 
present important position as one of the valued executive officers of the 
Ohio Valley Electric Railway Company, of which he is superintendent, 
and to the affairs of which he acords the most scrupulous attention. 

Allen Lee Thuma was born at Milton, Cabell County, West Vir- 
ginia, on the 20th of July, 1878, and is a son of Chapman J. and Adelia 
(Oakes) Thuma, the former of whom was born at Bridgewater, Virginia, 
in 1837, and the latter of whom was born at Collins, near Charleston, 
West Virginia, in 1855. The father was a carpenter by trade and became 
a successful contractor and builder, the family removal to Ironton, 
Ohio, having ocurred when Allen L.. of this review, was a child. Chap- 
man J. Thuma died in the year 1886, and his widow long survived him, 
the closing years of her life having been passed in Ironton, where she 
died in 1904. Of the three children the eldest is he whose name intro- 
duces this article; John Clifton is barn si;perintendent for the Ohio 



HANGLXG ROCK IRON REGION 703 

Valley Electric R.ailway Company; and Bonnie likewise resides at 
Ironton. 

The public schools of Ironton afiforded to Allen L. Thuma his early 
educational advantages, and in the same he continued his studies until 
he had attained to the age of fifteen years. He then obtained a posi- 
tion in the Ironton offices of the Fort Wayne Electric Light Company, 
and with this company and its successor he has continued to be actively 
identified during his entire business career. From the position of office 
boy he made his way forward to positions of constantly increasing respon- 
sibility, and in the meanwhile he gained a thorough knowledge of all 
details of the line .of enterprise along which he has effectively directed 
his energies. Since the year 1900 he has held his present important 
executive office, that of superintendent of the Ohio Valley Electric 
Railway Company, a corporation whose progressive policies and liberal 
enterprise have done much to further the civic and material prosperity 
of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of the fine old Buckeye State. Mr. 
Tluinia is a director of the Ironton Electric Company, is a practical elec 
trician of distinctive ability, and as a citizen he is essentially loyal 
and public spirited. He is the owner of his attractive residence property 
at Ironton and has identified himself fully with the interests of the 
city that has represented his home from his childhood days. In politics 
he is found aligned as a stanch supporter of the cause of the republican 
party, and he is affiliated wdth the Knights of Pythias. At the time of 
the Spanish-American war Mr. Thuma served as a member of Company 
I. Seventh Ohio. Volunteer Infantry, and he is now identified with the 
veteran association maintained by those who participated in that mem- 
orable conflict. Mr. Thuma is well know-n in Ironton and vicinity and 
has a wide circle of friends in both business and social circles. 

^Ir. Thuma married Miss Nora Jane George, daughter of William 
E. George, who has been chief of the Ironton Fire Department since 
1872. ]Mr. and Mrs. Thuma have an adopted daughter. Alma. 

John C. Thuma. In the city that has been his home from boy- 
hood Mr. Thuma has found ample opportunity for productive effort 
along normal lines of enterprise, and he is now the efficient and popular 
incumbent of the position of superintendent of the car barns of the 
Ohio Valley Electric Railway Company, at Ironton, Lawrence County, 
his elder brother, Allen L., being the company's general superintendent 
and being individuallj^ mentioned on other pages of this publication. 

John Clifton Thuma is the second in order of birth of the three 
children of Chapman J. and Adelia (Oakes) Thuma, and his parents 
were residents of Ironton, Ohio, at the time of their death, the father. 



704 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

who was a carpenter and contractor, having died in 1886 and the mother 
in 1904. Chairman J. Thuma was a native of Bridgewater, Virginia, 
where he was born in 1837, a scion of a sterling old family of that his- 
toric commonwealth, and his wife was born near Charleston, West Vir- 
ginia, in 1855. He whose name introduces this article attended the 
excellent public schools of Ironton until he was fifteen years of age, 
and he thereafter gave his attentioii to zealous work in saw mills and in 
connection with other lines of industry for six years. At the expira- 
tion of this period he went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he was employed 
in lumber yards for the ensuing six months. He then returned to Iron- 
ton and obtained employment as a general laborer for the Ohio Valley 
Electric Railway Company. For the first six months his work was 
principally in the digging of holes for the poles used for the electric 
lines, and for two years thereafter he was a practical lineman, his ability 
and faithful service bringing to him advancement to the position of line 
foreman, an incumbency M'hich he retained about three years. Since 1906 
Mr. Thuma has been the superintendent of the company's well equipped 
car barns at Ironton, and his effective service as well as his genial per- 
sonality have made him popular alike with the officers of the company, 
the employes and the general public. 

Mr. Thuma is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce and 
is essentially loyal and progressive in his civic attitude. His political 
allegiance is given to the republican party, and he is affiliated with the 
Knights of Pythias and the Improved Order of Red Men. 

On the 22d of February, 191-4, Mr. Thuma made consistent observ- 
ance of the birthday of Gen. George Washington, in that the day marked 
the solemnization of his marriage to Miss Ora Alice Riter, daughter of 
Philip Riter, a well known citizen and furnace-man of Ironton. 

Smith S. Little.john. The subjective qualities that beget popular 
confidence and respect are not lacking in the character of the present 
treasurer of Lawrence County, and the mere fact that he has been 
called to the important fiscal office of which he is the valued incumbent 
shows significantly the estimate placed upon him in the county of which 
he is a representative citizen and in which he stands exponent of most 
loyal and liberal citizenship. I\Ir. Littlejohn is a scion of a family whose 
name has been closely and worthily linked with the history of Ohio 
during virtually an entire century, and his ancestral record in the 
Buckeye State is one of which he may well be proud, even as may he 
also of the more remote genealogical history in both the agnatic and 
maternal lines. 

Mr. Littlejohn was born at Jackson, the jucKcial center of Jackson 



IIAXGIXG ROCK IROxN REGION 705 

County, Ohio, and tlie date of liis nativity was June 18, 1858. He is a 
son of James and Cynthia (Smitli) Littlejohn, the former of whom was 
born in Seioto County, Ohio, in the year 1820, and the latter of whom 
was born in Greenup County, Kentucky, in 1824. The Littlejohn family 
Avas founded in Ohio within a short time after the admission of the 
State to the Union, and its representatives in the various generations 
have proved sterling citizens of industrious habits and definite loyalty 
to all that makes for civic and material development and progress. James 
Little.john devoted the major part of his active career to agricultural 
pursuits and was a man who ever commanded inviolable place in popular 
confidence and esteem. He was originally a whig and later a republi- 
can in politics and he was sixty-five years of age at the time of his death, 
in 1885. His widow attained to the venerable age of eighty-seven years 
and was summoned to the life eternal in 1911, her memory being re- 
vered by all who came within the compass of her gentle influence. They 
became the parents of ten children, two of whom died in infancy. Those 
who attained to years of maturity are here designated by name and in 
order of nativity: William H., Alice, James I., Louis C, Smitli S., 
INIargaret E., Mary, and Clarion E. 

Smith S. Littlejohn was reared to adult age in Scioto County and 
there was afforded the advantages of the public schools of Wheelersburg, 
after whch he attended the National Normal LTniversity, at Lebanon, 
this State, until he had attained to the age of twenty years. Through 
this effective discipline he admirably fortified himself for the pedagogic 
])rofession, and for seven years he was numbered among the representa- 
tive teachers in the schools of Scioto County. After his retirement from 
this line of jirofessional endeavor he rented a farm in the same county, 
and for two years he devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits. 
He then, in 1879, removed to Lawrence County, where he located in the 
little village of Steece, in Elizabeth Township, and assumed the position 
of manager of the general store of the firm of E. B. AVillard & Company, 
"with which firm he continued for fifteen years and one month — a period 
within which he gained wide acciuaintanceship through the county and 
made for himself a host of loj-al friends. In 1901 he removed to Iron- 
ton, the county seat, Avhere he remained one 3'ear, and for the ensuing 
nine years he had charge of the Hanging Rock Furnace property, with 
residence and headquarters at Pine Grove. He was thus prominently 
concerned with the great iron industry of this section of the State and 
at the expiration of the period noted he was transferred to the charge of 
the firm's general store at Hanging Rock, where he remained thus 
engaged for three years. Thereafter he was assistant seeretai\v of the 
Union Furnace Company until 1913, when he was elected county treas- 



706 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

urer, the duties of which position he has since discharged with character- 
istic zeal and ability and to the distinct benefit of the county and its 
people. He is a man of fine administrative ability and marked capacity 
for detail, so that the business of the treasurer's office is found at all 
times in the best of order, the while he is punctilious in doing all in his 
power to subserve the financial prosperity of the county through the 
effective management of its fiscal affairs. While a resident of Scioto 
County IMr. Littlejohn served six years as justice of the peace, and inci- 
dentally he gained comprehensive and accurate knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of law. He has proved worthy of the implicit trust reposed in 
him by others and has had much to do with the management of estates 
and properties of important order. 

In politics Mr. Littlejohn has been found a stalwart supporter of 
the principles and policies for which the republican party has ever 
stood sponsor in a basic way, and he holds membership in the Baptist- 
Church. He is actively affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, including 
its adjunct organization, the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
]\Iystic Shrine. His interests center in his home, and the family resi- 
dence, an attractive property owned by him, is made a center of gen- 
erous and refined hospitality, with his wife and daughter as its popular 
chatelaines. 

On the 30th of August, 1881. at the home of the bride's parents. 
"William and Augusta Raushahous, of Portsmouth, Ohio, was solemnized 
the marriage of Mr. Littlejohn to Miss Amelia Raushahous, and the only 
child of this union is ]\Iiss Addie A., who remains at the parental home. 

Arxo C. Robisok. Among those who have borne a substantial and 
helpful part in the development and progress of the Planging Rock 
Iron Region during modern times, one deserAdng of special mention is 
Arno C. Robisou, of Ironton. An able and successful lawyer, a for- 
mer auditor of Lawrence County, a worker in public spirited enterprise, 
and a citizen who has gained hosts of friends in this section of the 
state. 

Arno C. Robison was born in IMonroe County, Ohio, February 16, 
1874, a son of James W. and Adaline I\I. (Stark) Robison. His father 
was born in Noble County, Ohio, in 1836, and now lives retired in Proc- 
torville, Lawrence County. His career during his active years was that of 
scliool teaching and farmi^lg. The mother, who was born in Jefferson 
County, Ohio, in 1836, died in 1900. Their seven children are briefly 
mentioned as follows: Lula B., now Mrs. C. W. McClure, of Hunting- 
ton, West Virginia ; ^lary E., a teacher in Sharon, Pennsylvania ; Marg- 
aret, a teacher at Huntington, WVst Virginia ; Ralph, a salesman in 







,^1^ . ^1/,^^. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 707 

Huntington, West Virginia ; Arno C. ; Chester T., a bookkeeper for one 
of the lumber companies at Ironton ; and Etta, now Mrs. Konns, of Hunt- 
ington, West Virginia. 

The early education of Arno C. Robison was acquired at the common 
schools of Crown City, Ohio, and at LaBelle, Ohio, and his higher train- 
ing was at the Ohio Northern University at Ada. Twelve years were 
spent in teaching, and during six years of that time he was on the 
examining board. His career as a teacher was followed by his election 
to the office of county auditor of Lawrence Countj^, and he was one 
of the county officials at the time the present courthouse was erected. 
It is the judgment of people well informed that the business of the 
auditor's office was never better managed than during the six years 
Mr. Robison had charge. After leaving that office he entered the law 
department of the Northern Ohio University at Ada, and continued his 
studies until graduating LL. B. in 1911. Since then he has been in active 
practice at Ironton, and his partner is J. L. Anderson, the Nestor of 
the Lawrence county bar. His success as an attorney has been due 
to his high standing as a citizen and gentleman, his broad acquaintance 
over the county, and a demonstrated ability for handling the intricate 
problems of the law whether in office or before a jury. 

Mr. Robison is a Knight Templar Mason, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias, the Knights of the Golden Eagle, both Lodge and Encamp- 
ment of Odd Fellowship and the Junior Order of United American 
Mechanics. Among his business interests he is a stockhokler in the 
IMarting Iron & Steel Company, has stock in the Ironton Portland 
Cement Company and in the Home Telephone Company. He is one of 
the trustees of the sinking fund of the City of Ironton. Politically his 
work has been with the republican party. While at college he was a 
member of the Cadet Corps and in the company which won the flag 
for iH'ing the best drilled company in the entire corps. IMr. Robison 
and family occupy one of the comfortable residences of Ironton, and his 
other property holdings include 122 acres of improved farm land in 
Rome Township of Lawrence County. He is assisting in the development 
work which is transforming Lawrence County to a fine fruit section l)y 
planting a large part of his land in fruit trees. 

Mr. Robison was married April 20, 1899, at Proetorville, Lawrence 
County, tcr Emma Eaton, daughter of John Eaton, a farmer. They are 
the parents of four cliildren : James C, Dwight E., Jolin II., deceased, 
and Alice M. 

Ge(iroe ]M. Salt>adav. It may well be understood that niore than 
passiiii,' interest attaches to the career of this well known and rejire- 



708 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

sentative citizen of Portsmouth when it is stated that he is a scion of 
the fourth generation of a family whose name has been prominently 
and worthily linked with the history of Scioto County since the open- 
ing year of the nineteenth century, long before this and other counties 
of Southern Ohio had been established and when this entire section 
was virtually an untrammeled wilderness. Mr. Salladay himself is 
now one of the more venerable of the native sons of Scioto County who 
still reside within its borders, and it is most gratifying to enter in 
this publication a review of his personal and ancestral history. 

On the farm of his father, in Clay Township, Scioto County, George 
M. Salladay was born on the 6th of February, 1847. His father, John 
Miller Salladay was born on a pioneer farmstead about one mile south 
of the present village of Wheelersburg, this county, and the date of 
his nativity was February 10, 1814. The latter was a son of George 
Salladay, who was born in the State of Maryland, in 1785, and who was 
a son of Philip Salladay, a native of Switzerland. Prior to or about 
the time of the War of the Revolution Philip Salladay emigrated from 
his native land to America and after residing a few years in Mary- 
land he removed to Western Pennsylvania, where he maintained his 
home until 1800, when he came to the wilds of what was then a vast 
region designated as the Northwest Territory and established his resi- 
dence in what is now Scioto County, Ohio, where he passed the residue 
of his life and where his name merits perpetual honor through his 
worthy achievement as one of the first settlers in this favored section 
of the Buckeye State. 

George Salladay, son of Philip, was a lad of about fifteen years at 
the time of the family removal to the present County of Scioto, and he 
was present at the time when the first tree was felled on the site of the 
present thriving City of Portsmouth, the judicial center of the county. 
He aided in the burning of the first brush piles assembled in connection 
with clearing the land now occupied by the county seat, and in later 
years gave many interesting reminiscences concerning incidents and 
conditions of the earliest pioneer days, his father having been one of 
the prominent and influential men of the sturdy little community of 
settlers in this section of the state. As a young man George Salladay 
entered claim to a tract of Government land in Porter Township, a few 
miles south of the present Town of Wheelersburg, and he lived up to 
the full tension of life on the frontier, many 'years having elapsed ere 
railroads were constructed and the canals having in the meanwhile 
formed the best means for the transportation of produce, merchandise, 
etc., though none of these arteries of traffic were in evidence for a long 
time after he had attained to adult age. Strong and loyal also were 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 709 

the noble women of the pioneer households, and upon them devolved 
not only the wonted domestic duties but also the spinning and weaving 
of the wool used in the making of the homespun eloth from which they 
fashioned the clothing for all members of their respective families. 

In that age of primitive things the pioneer farmers of this section 
used to combine their forces and construct flatboats, by means of which 
their produce was transported down the Ohio and I\Iississippi rivers 
to the nearest available market — the City of New Orleans — where the 
product found ready cash demand and where the boats likewise were 
sold. It is a matter of family record that George Salladay made two 
voyages to New Orleans in charge of these rude transportation boats, 
the return trips being made by him on foot and several months elaps- 
ing on each occasion before he again arrived at his home. This sturdy 
pioneer improved a productive farm and on his original homestead he 
continued to reside until the close of his life, his death having occurred 
on the 5th of October, 1860. On the 17th of :\Iay, 1812, was solemnized 
the marriage of George Salladay to 3Iiss Phoebe Chaffin, who was born 
in Connecticut, September 30, 1794, and whose deatli occurred July 
27, 1855. They became the parents of ten children, and in their off- 
spring they effectually perpetuated the principles of integrity and the 
sterling habits of industry and frugality. 

John Miller Salladay was reared to adult age under the conditions 
and influences of the pioneer farm and early gained appreciation of 
the dignity and value of honest toil. As a young man he found employ- 
ment at various kinds of work, opportunities along this line being 
limited, and for his services he received at times the princely stipend 
of fifty cents a day and his dinner, the other two meals of the day 
having been provided at his own home. He began his career as an 
independent farmer by renting land in Porter Township, and through 
energy and good management he finally accumulated a little sum of 
money, but ill health caused a cessation of his labors and involved the 
expenditure of all of his hard-earned savings. After recuperating his 
energies he rented a farm in Clay Township, the property having been 
owned by John Orm. Within a short time one of the township officials 
ordered him to leave the township, there having been no expectation 
that he would obey, but this action having been taken as a precautionarv 
measure, owing to the provisions of the law of the locality and period, 
to the effect that in case of illness and indigency he could apply to the 
township authorities for aid unless lie had pre^^ously been ordered to 
leave. The official disquietude proved, however, -sWthout cause, for 
within a few years the industrv^ and good judgment of Mr. Salladay 
acquired sufficient funds to justify his purchase of the William Oldfield 



710 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

farm, three miles north of the Chillicothe Pike Road. There he entered 
vigorously upon his specially successful career as an agriculturist and 
stock grower, and as circumstances justified such action he purchased 
other lands and became one of the substantial landholders and repre- 
sentative farmers of his native county. He was the owner of four 
good farms at the time of his death, which occurred August 20, 1902, 
and the closing period of his noble and unassuming life were passed 
in the homes of his children, who accorded to him and to their mother 
the deepest filial solicitude. 

]May 27, 1840, recorded the marriage of John M. Salladay to Miss 
Martha Hayward, who was a representative of an old colonial family 
of New England and of one that sent sterling citizens to Ohio in the 
early pioneer history of this commonwealth. Her father, Moses Hay- 
ward, was born in Connecticut, in 1766, and was a son of Captain Caleb 
Hayward, who gained his title through his serving as master of vessels 
plying the Atlantic Ocean. Captain Hayward was a native of Scot- 
land and upon immigrating to America established his home in Con- 
necticut. In 1787 Moses Hayward, whose name has appeared in various 
records as Howard, removed to Vermont, and there, in January, 1793, 
he wedded Hannah Smith. They continued their residence in the old 
Green :\Iountain State until 1814, when they set forth for the West. 
They passed two years at Pittsljurgh, Pennsylvania, and then came 
to Scioto County, Ohio, and established their home in Vernon Town- 
ship. There Mr. Hayward obtained a tract of land and instituted the 
development of a farm, besides which he owned and operated one of 
the first distilleries in this section of the state. He died on the 2d of 
October, 1860, at the patriarchal age of ninety-four years, his wife 
having passed away on the 2d of August, 1834; they reared a large 
family of children. Mrs. Martha (Hayward) Salladay, mother of him 
whose name introduces this article, was summoned to eternal rest on 
tile 29th of ]\Iay, 1892. John M. Salladay was originally a whig and 
later a republican in polities, and .both he and his wife were earnest 
members of the ]\Iethodist Episcopal Church. Of their three children 
Harriet J. died at the age of nineteen years; Lora A. became the wife 
of Samuel Brierly; and George M. is the immediate subject of this 
review. 

The ])oyhoo(l and youth of George Moses Salladay did not lack a 
due demand upon his attention in connection with the work of the 
lionu' farm, and in the meanwhile he availed himself of tlie advantages 
of the common schools of the locality and period. A few months after 
his marriage he located on one of his father's farms, in Washington 
Township, and eligibly situated on the (ialena Tunijiikc Roail, to tlie 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 711 

ownership of which property he later succeeded. Like his honored 
father, he has been a man of energy, enterprise and cii-eumspection, and 
the tangible evidences of his success are shown in his ownership at the 
present time of a valuable landed estate of more than 700 acres, the 
greater part being the fine alluvial soil of the bottom lands of the 
Scioto Valley. He has now virtually retired from active labor but 
still gives his general supervision to his farms and maintains his home 
in the City of Portsmouth, where he owns his attractive residence, at 
816 Waller Street. His political allegiance has been unfalteringly 
given to the republican party, he is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, 
and both he and his wife hold membership in the IMethodist Episcopal 
Church. 

On the 18th of February, 1874, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Salladay to Miss Nettie lams Feurt, who likewise was born and 
reared in Scioto County, as was also her father, John Davidson Feurt, 
the date of whose nativity was March 2, 1816 ; his father, Gabriel Feurt, 
was born in the State of New Jersey, on the 9th of December, 1779, and 
was a son of Joseph and IMary (Davidson) Feurt. It is not definitely 
known at what time the Feurt family was founded in New Jersey, but 
representatives of the family have been prominent in that and; other 
states of the Union, the original German orthography having in numer- 
ous ca.ses been changed to Fort. Essentially authentic data indicate that 
Joseph Feurt came to the West as early as 1791 and established his 
residence near the mouth of the Scioto River, but on account of the 
menace from the Indians he crossed over the Ohio River and lived 
for a time at Maysville, Kentucky. He finally returned to Ohio and 
settled in what is now Scioto County, where he entered claim to Govern- 
ment land in the present Township of Washington, his pioneer home- 
stead having been traversed by Pond Creek. There he continued to 
reside until his death, in 1806, and he M'as one of the earliest settlers 
in this section of the Territory of Ohio. His wife was born February 1, 
1765, and was a daughter of George and Mary (Warren) Davidson. She 
survived her husband by a few years and the names of their children 
were as here noted : Benjamin F., Gabriel, Mary, George, Susanna, 
Merly, Bar.tholomew, and Thomas. 

As gauged by the standards of the loeality and period, Gabriel Feurt 
received an excellent education, and as a young man he gave effective 
service in connection with early sur\'eying work in this part of Ohio. He 
learned also the trade of cooper and finally he and his brother-in-law, 
Jacob Noel, entered claim to a large tract of Government land on the 
Scioto River bottoms, about five miles distant from Portsmouth. There 
they reclaimed much of the land from the virgin wilds, and a portion of 



712 HAXGiXG ROCK IRON REGION 

this large estate is now owned by descendants of Mr. Feurt, the property- 
being one of the most valuable farms of Scioto County. On this home- 
stead Gabriel Feurt died in 1850. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Lydia Hitchcock, was born in Clay Township, this county, and was a 
tiaughter of George Hitchcock, her father having been a native of Con- 
necticut and having become one of the pioneer settlers of Scioto County, 
Ohio, where he owned the land now comprising the Peebles farm and a 
portion of the site of the Village of New Boston. After the death of 
her husband Mrs. Feurt removed to the City of Portsmouth, where her 
death occurred on the 10th of January, 1864. The names of the children 
are here entered in respective order of birth: Isabella, John D., James 
II. and Lavinia. The last mentioned became the wife of John T. Flint, 
a prominent lawyer and influential citizen of Waco, Texas. 

John D. Feurt, the father of ]\lrs. Salladay, eventually inherited a 
l^ortion of the fine old homestead farm of his father and to this he 
added by the purchase of other land, until he became the owner of one 
of the best farms in Scioto County, his progressiveness having been indi- 
cated by his erecting fine buildings on the place and by bringing the 
farm up to the highest standard in all respects. He resided on his farm 
until his death, as did also his wife, Maria, who was a daughter of the 
late Judge William Oldfield, an honored and influential citizen of Scioto 
('ounty. Mr. Feurt was first a whig and thereafter a republican in 
l)olitics and he commanded inviolable esteem in the community which 
was his home throughout life. He held various township offices and 
served ten years as justice of the peace. The marriage of John D. Feurt 
and Maria Oldfield was solemnized in the year 1839, and they became 
the parents of nine children, and concerning those who attained to 
maturity the following brief record is given : Caroline C. became the 
wife of Henry C. Feurt; Lydia married John Lindsey; Harriet E. first 
wedded William H. Peters and after his death became the wife of 
Thomas J. Brown; Nettie I. is the wife of Mr. Salladay of this sketch; 
Frances B. became the wife of John F. Noel ; and the two sons are John 
F. and William. 

Mr. and Mrs. Salladay have one daughter, Martha, who is the wife 
of Charles F. Tracy, of Scioto County, and whose three children are 
Lucille, Harold Salladay. and Edna Louise. 

Rev. James H. Cotter,, LL. D. Ceaselessly to and fro flies the deft 
shuttle that weaves the web of human destiny, and into the vast fabric" 
enters the accompli.shraent of all individuality, penetrating both warp 
and woof and lending either the sheen of usefulness and beauty or the 
dark and zigzag lines of unintelligible obscurity. To place final valua- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 713 

tions is not within the power of human kind but remains the preroga- 
tive and function of the One who is above all and over all, but there be 
those whose gracious and noble personalities, splendid powers and 
unlimited consecration give an impression that can not fail to be 
nppreciated by all who have aught of cognizance of the true significance 
of human thought and motive.. To give within the pages of a work 
of the circumscribed province assigned to the one at hand adequate 
tribute to the character and services of Doctor Cotter is in the realm 
of the impossible, but it is imperative that there be mention of the man, 
the priest, the patriot, the scholar, the lover of humanity whose name 
initiates this paragraph and who is rector of St. Lawrence Church in the 
City of Ironton. Not alone has his zeal been fruitful in good works and 
large results in the high calling to which he has consecrated himself, 
but he has gained also a national reputation as an orator and author. His 
intellectual attainments are on a parity with his devotion to the great 
mother church of Christendom and to the aiding and uplifting of his 
fellow men; better commendation than this could be given to no man. 

Rev. James H. Cotter was bora in County Tipperary, Ireland, in the 
year 1857, "amid scenes calculated to inspire poetry and eloquence." 
He is a son of George and Sarah (Delhanty) Cotter, representatives of 
stanch old families of the fair Emerald Isle, where both George Cotter 
and his wife were born in the year 1826, having passed the closing period 
of their lives at Ironton, Ohio, where they found a home in 1893, and 
where both died in the year 1896, their gracious evening of life having 
lieen solaced by the filial devotion of their son, Doctor Cotter, of this 
review. The names of their nine children are here entered, in respective 
order of birth : Fannie, Thomas, Jane, James H., George, Richard, Al- 
bert, Sarah, and William. 

Doctor Cotter was fifteen years of age at the time of the family 
immigration from Ireland to America and he acquired his early educa- 
tion in the parochial schools in the State of New York, where also he 
pursued his higher academic studies in Manhattan College, in New 
York City, an institution in which he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1877 and with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He later received 
the degree of Master of Arts from his alma mater, and the institution 
further honored him, in 1906, by conferring upon him the degree of 
Doctor of Laws, the same degree having likewise been accorded to him 
by Blount St. Mary's Seminary, Maryland, in 1908. Concerning this 
period in his career the f ollovidng statements have been written : ' * During 
his years at Manhattan he was noted for his devotion to literature and for 
his assiduous cultivation of good style in prose and verse. He com- 
pleted his course in theology at Mount St. Mary's Seminary, and in 



714 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

1881 was ordained to the priesthood of the Catholic Church, in the 
diocese of Columbus, Ohio. Before his ordination he taught rhetoric 
at Mount St. Mary's in the third and fourth collegiate classes." 

Father Cotter has held the rectorship of St. Lawrence Church, Iron- 
ton, since 1889, and thus this parish has received his ministrations and 
pastoral supervision during the greater part of the time since holy 
orders were conferred upon him. Under his administration the church 
has waxed strong along both spiritual and temporal lines, and his gra- 
cious personality has gained him the affection of the entire community, 
irrespective of sectarian afifiliations. Under the zealous supervision of 
Doctor Cotter there was erected, in 1891, the present fine ehurcli of 
St. Lawrence; the modern and model parish house, in 1904; and the 
large and finely appointed parish school building, in 1911. 

From a previously published sketch of the career of Doctor Cotter 
are taken, with but slight paraphrase, the following extracts: "Father 
Cotter is the author of many sermons and lectures, and of 'Shakespeare's 
Art,' a volume embracing many valuable critical studies in nine of 
Shakespeare's masterpieces — which he prepared in recreation hours 
during busy years of pastoral life. He has also been chosen as orator 
of the day on many historic occasions. He succeeded the late lamented 
Father Cronin as the principal editorial writer on the Catholic Union 
and Times, of Buffalo, New York, a position which he still retains. A 
collection of his editorials on papal questions, gorgeously bound in gold 
and crushed levant, wa^ made by the Catholic Publication Society, of 
Buffalo, and presented to the Holy Father, Pius X, in his jubilee year, 
1908. As a lecturer Doctor Cotter's reputation is national. His lec- 
tures on ' Liberty, ' ' Julius Caesar, ' ' The ^Merchant of Venice, ' and ' Mac- 
beth ' are among the classics of platform eloquence. The Boston Journal 
of Education says of his work entitled 'Shakespeare's Art:' 'One Cot- 
ter, with his zealous vision of the son of Stratford, does more than all 
the defenders of the play to steady the faith of the world in the per- 
sonality of Shakespeare.' " 

A really wonderful work is that which has been more recently written 
and published by Doctor Cotter, and which is entitled "Lances Hurled 
at the Sun." The preface to this volume was written by Rt. Rev. Charles 
H. Colton, D. D., Bishop of Buffalo, New York, and was issued by the 
Catholic Union and Times Press, of Buffalo. From many commendatory 
statements it is appropriate that in this volume be perpetuated the fol- 
lowing words by Most Rev. John Ireland, D. D.: "I thank you very 
cordially for the gift of your volume, 'Lances Hurled at the Sun,' and 
at the same time I take the liberty to thank you for the talent and indus- 
try with which you have, as this volume shows, defended before the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 715 

American public the truths of Holy Religion. You are a model to the 
priesthood of America, in the reading of events and occurrences bearing 
one way or another upon the life and teachings of the Church, in the 
readiness to take a lance in hand to vindicate her honor ; in the skill with 
which 3'ou ply the arms of defense and offense. May God bless and 
prosper your pen." 

From a critical review appearing in the Catholic Standard and Times, 
Philadelphia, are taken the following excerpts: " 'Lances Hurled at 
the Sun,' after a simile of Tennyson's in 'Locksley Hall,' is a simile the 
more remarkable from the fact that the barbarians who today hurl their 
weapons at the God of Heaven are not children, but mature men and 
women who think themselves qualified to out-reason religion and who 
laugh at the revelations of Christ and the Apostles as unfit food for an 
age that demands 'strong meat for men.' Father Cotter's themes are 
the monstrosity of many of the theories put forward by the crowd of 
' know-it-all ' university professors and agnostic quacks, the pretentions 
of the 'modernists' and other lance-hurlers. He is the possessor of a 
keen method of logic and Celtic sense of delicate humor that in season 
flavors his essays with Attic salt. Many a quaint conceit and apt illus- 
tration brighten the stream of his exposition as it ripples, indignantly 
or merrily, as the subject demands, along its course." 

Doctor Cotter has traveled extensively in Europe and the United 
States and few men have been capable of learning and imparting more 
valuable lessons from experiences with men and affairs. The Doctor 
presided at the third annual meeting of the Catholic Press Association 
of the United States and Canada, and was with Archbishop Ireland, of 
St. Paul, and Judge Minehan, of Seattle, Washington, one of the mass- 
meeting orators at the Federation of the Catholic Societies of the United 
States, held in the City of ^lilwaukee, Wisconsin, in 1913. He was also 
one of those who delivered addresses at the second ^Missionary Congress, 
held in the City of Boston, in 1913. 

With the nations of Europe plunged deep in the sanguinary vortex 
of warfare, there is signal interest attaching to an editorial written by 
Doctor Cotter for the Catholic Union and Times, under the title of 
"Faith and Country." This article breathes of the loftiest spirit of 
patriotism and deep humanitarianism and was inspired by the obsequies 
incidental to the funeral of the sailors killed in the recent conflict between 
the United States and Mexican forces at Vera Cruz, Mexico. The edi- 
torial appeared in i\Iay, 1914, and from it brief quotation may con- 
sistently be made in conclusion of this sketch : 

"A classic writer of antiquity said, 'It is sweet and glorious to die 



716 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

for one's country/ Christianity has approved the pronouncement but 
supernaturalized the motive. With the Christian, love of country goes 
farther than the feeling which clings to old associations and to our fel- 
iows, kindred in manners and affiliations; he is a patriot because it is a 
duty of faith. St. Thomas has given all the obligations of a good Catholic 
in one concise passage: 'My God first, country second, and self last.' 
* * * There is much jingo about love of country, but the man who 
writes his devotion in the red ink of his heart, he it is who, in the words 
of President Wilson, gives 'patriotic service' — something that can not 
be underrated in fact nor discounted in pvirpose. * * * Truth and 
Liberty have ever been and will forever be linked. 'The truth shall 
make you free' is good ethics as well as correct scripture. The Catholic 
who loves the truth must perforce love liberty, and love America, its 
'lioly ground.' Truth unchains high aspirations, while falsehood dwarfs 
and stifles them. Truth is light, and in light liberty always happily dis- 
ports herself. * * * ^lay the same God who founded the Church 
set securely and forever on lasting foundations the country of our love — 
America ! big, generous America, that the Omnipotent hid for centuries 
behind His hand from the gaze of Europe, so that afterward it might 
])e the worthy home and safe retreat of liberty violated in Europe." 

Fred G. Roberts. The bar of Lawrence County has one of its 
ablest members in Fred G. Roberts, who has been in practice at Ironton 
since 1910 and has the further distinction of being the only, democrat 
ever elected to the office of probate judge in Lawrence County. He 
l)egan, like so many successful professional men, his career as a teacher, 
and by hard work and by following his ambition steadily finally per- 
fected himself in the law, and now holds a place in the front ranks of 
liis profession at Ironton. 

Fred G. Roberts was born at Waterloo, Lawrence County, August 
18, 1880. His father, Joseph A. Roberts, was born in Summers County, 
West Virginia, in 1843, and during the gi-eat Civil War made a record 
as a soldier. Farming has been his vocation, and he still lives at Water- 
loo. The mother's maiden name was Amanda Hutchison, also a native 
of Summers County, West Virginia, and she was born in 1847 and died 
in 1907. Their eight children were: Emma, William H., May, Burton, 
Hudson, Fred G., Ernest and Roanoke. 

Fred G. Roberts as a boy lived on the farm and attended the village 
schools of Waterloo, and subsequently pursued his law course in the 
Cincinnati Law School. Eight years of his life were spent in the school- 
room as a teacher, and at the time of his mother's death he was ready 
to go away to law sehool. Imt the loss of his mother and a sister about 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 717 

the same time interfered with his plans, and he had to resume teaching 
for a couple of years in order to secure the means for a college course. 
In spite of handicaps and obstacles, Mr. Roberts since his admission to 
tlie bar in 1910 has made an unusually successful record, and his work 
has been characterized by a thorough ability and an extreme fidelity to 
the interests of all clients. 

Mr. Roberts was married October 12, 1911. to Bertha C. Paul, 
daughter of Moses D. Paul, now living retired at Ironton. They are 
the parents of one child, Marjorie. Mr. Roberts and family attend the 
^Icthodist Episcopal Church, and in politics he is a democrat. 

Thomas J. Kennedy. Ironton, the flourishing metropolis and judi- 
cial center of Lawrence County, claims as one of its popular and repre- 
sentative citizens and successful business men Thomas J. Kennedy, who 
is here engaged in the insurance and real estate business, as representa- 
tive of fourteen different companies of stability and high reputation, his 
nttention being given specially to the underwriting of fire insurance, in 
which department of his liusiness he has a large and important 
clientage. 

Mr. Kennedy was born in the city that is now his home, and the date 
of his nativity was February 2, 1877. He is a son of Thomas and Ade- 
laide (Chamberlain) Kennedy, the former of whom still resides in Iron- 
ton, where he is living, after having long been identified with the rolling 
mill industry, and the latter of whom died in 1889, at the age of forty- 
three years, the six children of this union having been James, William, 
John. Thomas J., Joseph and p]dward. The father was born in Ireland, 
in 1847, and was six years of age at the time of his parents' immigration 
to America, the family home being established in the City of St. Louis, 
^Missouri, where he was reared to maturity and afforded the advantages 
of the local schools. He came to Ironton, Ohio, about the year 1865, and 
during the years of his long and useful business life he was identified 
almost consecutively with the operation of the iron and steel rolling mills 
in this section of the state. 

Thomas J. Kennedy attended the parochial and public schools of Iron- 
ton until he had completed the curriculum of the high school, and at the 
age of seventeen years he assumed the position of clerk in the establish- 
ment of the IMcJoynt Hardware Company, by which he was employed 
two years. For the ensuing eighteen months he was an agent for the 
Prudential Insurance Company, of Newark, New Jersey, and in this 
connection he acquired his initial experience in the line of business in 
which he has since achieved marked success and precedence. After he 
had thus served as solicitor for the Pi'iTdential company there came dis- 



718 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

tinetive recognition of his effective work and special ability, since the 
company then advanced him to the position of assistant superintendent 
of its agency at Portsmouth, Scioto County, where he remained three 
years. For the following three and one-half years he was a representa- 
tive of the company in the Mansfield district of Ohio, and after an 
effective service of eight years with the Prudential he returned, in 1904, 
to Ironton, where he engaged independently in the general insurance 
business, to which he has since given his close attention and in which his 
success has been of iinequivocal order. His agency is one of the largest 
in Lawrence County and its operations cover fire, life, accident and 
other lines of insurance indemnity. Mr. Kennedy is interested in sev- 
eral Ironton industries, and is secretary of the Home Building & Loan 
Company of Ironton. He is recognized as one of the alert and progres- 
sive business men and loyal and public-spirited citizens of his native city, 
and the secure place that he maintains in popular confidence and esteem 
is indicated by the fact that he served from 1912 to 1914 as mayor of 
Ironton, his administration being signally progressive and efficient, so 
that he was importuned to become a candidate for a second term, an 
overture which he felt compelled to decline, by reason of the demands 
and exactions of his private business. ]\Ir. Kennedy is a repul)lican in 
his political allegiance. He is affiliated with the Masonic fraternity, 
including the Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the ^lystic Shrine, 
and is also a valued and popular member of the local lodge of the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 14th of September, 1898, was solemnized the naarriage of 
Mr. Kennedy to Miss Emma Mettendorf, daughter of A. H. Mettendorf, 
a prominent business man and influential citizen of Ironton. The two 
children of this union are Lowell and Adelaide. 

Evan H. Jones. A scion of sturdy Welsh lineage and a representa- 
tive of a well known pioneer family of the district of the Buckeye 
State to which this history is devoted, ]\Ir. Jones has been long and 
prominently identified with business activities in the City of Ironton, 
Lawrence County, where he is now engaged in the automobile sale and 
livery business. He was the pioneer operator of one of the important 
stage lines in this section and few men in the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region have a wider circle of acquaintances than he, this implying vir- 
tually his possession of an equal number of staunch friends. In his pres- 
ent enterprise, which is one of the most substantial and important in 
this section of the state, Mr. Jones has fully upheld the prestige and 
popularity which he enjoyed in the earlier period of his business career, 
and it is most consonant that in this pu])lication be entered a ln*ief 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 719 

tri))ute to the man, the citizen, the friend whom everyone in his range 
of influence as accorded the fullest measure of confidence and good will. 

My. Jones was born near Centerville, Gallia County, Ohio, on the 
fifteenth of June, 1848, and is a son of Evan and Anna (Davis) Jones, 
both natives of Wales, where the former was born in the year 1829. 
Their acquaintanceship was formed on the sailing vessel which afforded 
them transportation across the Atlantic to the United States, and their 
marriage was solemnized within a short time after their arrival in the 
land of their adoption. Mrs. Jones passed to the life eternal in 1854, 
and later Mr. Jones wedded ]\Iiss Frances Ray, who survived him by 
about four years, as she passed away in 1908 and he died in 1904. 
Of the three children of the first marriage the first born was Ebenezer, 
who died young ; Mary is the wife of Edward Stratton, of Winchester, 
Kentucky ; and Evan H., of this review is the youngest of the three, he 
having been about seven years old at the time of his mother's death. 
The five children of the second marriage are here named in order of 
their birth : James, Frank, Alice, Minerva, and Charles. 

Evan H. Jones attended school about one year in his native couiTty 
and the family then removed to Floyd County, Kentucky, where he 
was enabled to continue his studies in the common schools for a period 
of about three years, his father having there been engaged in the work 
of his trade, that of brick and stone mason, to which he gave his 
attention during the major part of his active career, his residence having 
been maintained in Ironton for a number of years prior to his demise. 
From Kentucky Evan H. Jones came to Ironton, where for three years 
he was employed as a teamster in the service of Benjamin Savage, a 
well known pioneer of Lawrence county. For the ensuing ten years 
he was here engaged in the coal business and then, in 1871, he estali- 
lislied the first stage or hack line between Ironton, Portsmouth and Ash- 
land, Kentucky. He began operation with one horse and a light vehicle 
and by the time four years had elapsed he had in requisition fifty horses, 
with other facilities in proportion. He opened the main road connect- 
ing tlie tliree cities mentioned and in his travels over his route he 
]iecaiii(> well known to citizens throughout the entire section traversed, 
lie sohljtlie stage line in 1875 and in the meantime he became also the 
owner and operator of tlie first moving vans in Ironton. He sold the 
stage line to Nicholas ]\Ic]\lahon and thereafter continued to conduct 
his van business until 1884, when he sold the same to Polly Brothers. 
From 1885 until 1914 he was actively and successfully engaged in the 
livery business, Avith a large and well equipped esta])lishment and a 
trade of very appreciable and profitable order. His services were spe- 
ciiilly ill requisition in connection with funerals, and liis equipnieiit.s 



720 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

for this line of service was recognized as the best in this section of the 
state. In 1914 he sold his livery business and is now engaged in the 
auto sale and livery business on South Third Street. In all the relations 
of life Mr. Jones has been found charitable, considerate and sympatlietic, 
ever ready to lend aid to those in affliction or distress, and in view of this 
it can not be considered strange that he has a host of friends in the coiu- 
munity which has long represented his home. lie is loyal and public- 
spirited as a citizen, is independent in politics and his religious faith is 
in harmony with the Christian Science tenets, both he and his wife 
attending and supporting the Ironton Church of this denomination. 
Mr. Jones resides in a pleasant home on South Fourth Street, being the 
owner of this property, and his residence is known for its gracious 
hospitality, with a ready welcome to all friends of himself and his family. 
On the 3d of July, 1867, at Ironton, was celebrated the marriage 
of Mr. Jones to ]\Iiss Lucinda Wilber, daughter of the late Henry 
Wilber, of Zanesville, this state. Concerning the children of this felici- 
tous union, the basis of an ideal home life, the following brief record is 
available : Charles, who is engaged in the undertaking business in Iron- 
ton, wedded Miss Matilda Pjberts; they have no children. Harry, who 
wedded Miss Clara Morgan has no children, he being engaged as a 
mail carrier in the City of Cincinnati. Frank died in childhood. Rose 
is the wife of Oscar Chatfield, of Pikesville, Kentucky, and they have 
two children. Wilber, who is associated with his father in the auto 
business, has been twice married and has one child, Ralph. He first 
wedded Miss Mary Pyles and after her death he married Miss Anna 
Price, who likewise is deceased. Emma is the wife of Walter Rumble, 
of Huntington, West Virginia. Walter, employed as a salesman in the 
City of Cincinnati, married Miss Nora Siiurz and they have one child. 

Edwin E. WinTL.\CJi. Although lie is comparatively a recent arrival 
in the City of Ironton, Edwin E. Whitlach has already become known 
as an energetic and progressive business man, possessed of those traits 
which make him a very, welcome addition to this city's circle of com- 
mercial men. in the conduct of the Ironton Feed Store his energies 
are rapidly giving him a reputation for honorable dealing and fidelity 
to engagements, and as a citizen he has shown .himself disposed to aid 
in all movements calculated to contribute to the community welfare. 
Mr. Whitlach is a native of the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio. 
having been l)orn at Mount Vernon Furnace, Ijawrenee (-ounly, .Mnrch 
2, 1876, and is a son of George W. and Margaret (Ridge) AVhitlacli. 

George W. Whitlach, who was an early settler of this region of 
Ohio, was born in 1831 at Vinton Furnace, Vinton County. Ohio, and 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 721 

early took up teaming as a vocation, an occupation which he followed 
throughout the active years of his life. He passed away in July, 1908. 
The mother, born in Pennsylvania in 1833, died in 1908, there being six 
children in the family, as follows : Rosie, Elsie, William, Charles, Ernest 
and Edwin E., of whom Ernest is deceased. The common schools of 
Decatur Township, Lawrence County, furnished Edwin E. Whitlach 
with his education, but at the age of seventeen years he laid aside the 
duties of student for those of teacher and for two years had charge of 
a school in the same locality. Next he turned his attention to store 
keeping for Vesuvius Furnace Company, with which concern he re- 
mained in the same capacity for four years, and then became bookkeeper 
for the Vesuvius Charcoal Company, a concern with which he was con- 
nected for a like period. Later he w^ent to the Halley Charcoal Company, 
as bookkeeper, and remained for fifteen months, when he w^ent to the old 
Center Furnace in a like position and and remained for eleven months. 
When that concern disposed of its plants and interests to the Superior 
Portland Cement Company, Mr. Whitlach remained as manager of the 
old Center Furnace for two years, and then was made buyer and man- 
ager for the store at Superior, and held this position for a period of one 
year. He was then superintendent of mines for the Superior Cement 
Company for two or three years, and in 1913 came to Ironton and 
engaged in the feed business, in partnership with J. E. Compliment, 
under the style of the Ironton Feed Store, with a well-equipped and 
well-stocked establishment at corner Second and Elm streets. This busi- 
ness has enjoyed a continued growth under his capable management and 
is now enjoying a good trade, attracted from all the surrounding territory. 
Mr. Whitlach is single. He is a democrat in his political views, but 
has not been an active politician. In his church matters he supports the 
Methodist faith. Although his business demands the greater part of his 
attention, he is not indifferent to the pleasure of companionship with 
his fellows, and is a great lover of all out-door sports. 

Leo Ebert. The late Leo Ebert, who died at his home in the City 
of Ironton, Lawrence County, on the 22d of February, 1908, was a man 
of strong and upright character and marked business ability, his influ- 
ence having long been potent in connection with civic and material 
progress in Ironton and his prominence and enterprise in the business 
activities involved in the operation of the extensive and modern brewery 
that perpetuates his name having made him one of the leading business 
men of this section of the Buckeye State, even as he was a loyal and 
progressive citizen who held inviolable place in popular confidence and 
esteem. 



722 HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 

Leo Ebert was born at Kingenberg, Kingdom of Bavaria, Germany, 
near the City of Frankfort, and the date of his nativity was June 28, 
1837, so that he was nearly seventy-one years of age at the time of his 
death. He was a son of Theodore and Barbara (Krutzman) Ebert, and 
the family name has been identified with the representative brewing 
enterprise of Bavaria for many generations, Theodore Ebert, father 
of the subject of this memoir, having fully upheld the prestige of the 
patronymic in this field of industry, and both he and his wife having 
remained in Bavaria until their death. Leo Ebert, the eldest in a family 
of four children, attended the excellent schools of his home town until he 
had attained to the age of twelve years, when he was placed by his 
father in the latter 's brewery, to be initiated into the mysteries of the 
business. For several years he was acquiring scientific and practical 
experience in the brewing business, — at Mannheim, Bremen and other 
places, — and he finally returned to the parental home and stood his 
chances in the conscription for the army. He was successful, however, 
in drawing a high number and thus was relieved of the military service. 

At the age of twenty-one years Mr. Ebert wedded Miss ]\Iathilda Urh- 
lein, and in 1859, shortly after this important event, he immigrated with 
his yoimg wife to the United States. Landing in the port of New York 
City, he there worked at his trade of brewer for nine months, and at the 
expiration of this period he came to Ohio and established his residence 
in the City of Cincinnati. Not being able to find immediate employ- 
ment at liis trade, he was compelled to work one summer in a brick yard, 
and finally he obtained a position as laborer in a Cincinnati brewery, 
liis ability and fine technical knowledge leading to his promotion from 
his humble capacity to that of foreman within the ensuing two months. 
After serving for foreman of the brewery for sixteen months J\Ir. Ebert 
came to Ironton, Lawrence County, in 1861. Here he established a 
brewery on a modest scale, and from that time forward his success 
became cumiilative and sulistantial. He continued as the executive head 
of the Ebert Brewing Company until his death and was one of the 
thoroughly loyal and liberal citizens of the Lawrence County metropolis, 
to the development and upbuilding of which he contributed in generous 
measure. He became financially interested in various other local enter- 
l^rises and Avas known and honored as one of the prominent and influ- 
ential citizens of this section of the state. 

Ill ]iolitics Mr. p]bei-t originally was aligned with the republican 
l)arty. but in 1872 he followed his sincere convictions and transferred 
his allegiance to the democratic party, with which he continued to be 
actively allied during the residue of his long and useful life. He was 
influential in the councils of his party and. as a convincing and effective 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 723 

public speaker, he "took the stump" in numerous campaigns. For more 
than seventeen years Mr. Ebert held official preferment in Ironton, 
where he served as a member of the city council, the board of education 
and the board of health. The fine intellectual ken and practical ability 
of Mr. Ebert marked him as eligible for office of distinguished order, 
and twice he received the democratic nomination for representative of 
his district in the United States Congress. While he was unable to over- 
come the large and normal republican majorities in the district, he brought 
out the full vote of his party and greatly reduced the natural majority 
of his opponents. 

In the most significant and worthy interpretation of the expression, 
Mr. Ebert was essentially a self-made man, and he had the sagacity and 
judgment to make the best of the opportunities afforded in the land of 
his adoption, with the result that he won large and substantial success, 
the while he so ordered his course as to merit and receive the high esteem 
of all who knew him. He was a man of commanding presence, brilliant 
intellect and broad human tolerance and sympathy. His kindliness and 
generosity were unfailing, but he never permitted his benevolences to 
come into publicity if this could be avoided, having been one of those 
who "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame." Genial and com- 
panionable, ^Ir. Ebert was not only an interesting conversationalist but 
also had remarkable gifts as an orator. For eight years Mr. Ebert 
served as president of the Ohio Brewers' Association, and for two years 
was president of the national organization of brewers. He was affiliated 
witli the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks, and the Knights of Pythias. The death of Mr. 
Ebert caused deep and sincere sorrow in his home city, and both business 
and social circles manifested their sense of irreparable loss. The noble 
character of Mr. Ebert found its most perfect exemplification in -the 
relations of his ideal home life, and his widow and children find their 
greatest measure of consolation and compensation in the memory of his 
devotion and abiding love and tenderness,^the gentleness of a strong 
and loyal nature. 

Of the six children of Leo and Mathilda (Urhlein) Ebert the eldest 
is Fannie, who is now the wife of Henry Geiger, identified with the 
brewing business in Ironton, and they have seven children, — Mathilda, 
Leo, Henry, Frederick, Charles, Otto, and Bertha. Gretchen, the second 
daughter, first wedded Michael Ranch, who is survived by two children, 
Otto and Walter. After the death of her first husband Mr. Ranch became 
the wife of August Ebert, a brewer by vocation, and they now reside in 
the City of St. Louis, Missouri, no children having been born of this union. 
Tillie is the wife of Charles Jones, engaged in the undertaking business 



724 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

in Ironton ; Otto N., the only son, is more specifically mentioned on other 
pages of this publication. Emma is the wife of Frederick Wagner, a 
representative farmer near Pedro, Lawrence County, and they have 
eight children, — Leona, Frederick, Walter, Henrietta, Harold, Ironton, 
Roy, and Franklin. Bertha is the wife of Dr. William C. Miller, engaged 
in the practice of dentistry in Ironton, and they have one son, Wil- 
liam C, Jr. 

Otto N. Ebert. In his native city of Ironton, Lawrence County, 
Mr. Ebert is fully upholding the high prestige of the family name, both 
as a man of affairs and as a citizen ready at all times to give his co- 
operation in the furtherance of those things that contribute to the 
welfare of the community. He is president of the Ebert Brewing Com- 
pany, one of the most substantial and important concerns of its kind in 
this section of the state, and of this responsible and exacting position 
he has been the incumbent since the death of his honored father, the late 
Leo Ebert, to whom a memoir is dedicated on other pa-ges of this publi- 
cation, so that at this juncture it is not necessary to enter further data 
concerning the family history. 

Otto N. Ebert was born in Ironton on the 1st of September, 1870, and 
is the only son in a family of six children, so that upon him have devolved 
almost entirely the large and exacting responsibilities that so long enlisted 
the able attention of his father. Mr. Ebert is indebted to the public 
schools of Ironton for his early educational discipline, and at the age 
of seventeen years he completed his studies in the high school and turned 
his attention to the practical affairs of life. He became identified with 
the operation of the extensive brewery founded by his father, and with 
the passing years he has familiarized himself thoroughly with all details 
of this line of industry and developed special ability as an executive. 
His father passed to eternal rest on the 22d of February, 1908, and the 
son was admirably fortified to become his successor in the presidency of 
the brewing company, an office in which he has maintained the enter- 
prise at the high standard that has ever marked the same, and has 
endeavored to follow out the progressive civic policies and exemplify the 
high ideals which signally marked the career of his father. Mr. Elbert 
is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is a democrat in liis 
political adherency, is affiliated with the United Commercial Travelers 
and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and he attends and 
supports the German Lutheran Church, in the faith of which he was 
reared. The brewery plant is owned by the family estate. His home is 
at the corner of Center and Seventh Streets, here being centered much 
social activity, with Mrs. Ebert as the popular chatelaine of the hospi- 
table home. 



HANGLNG ROCK IRON REGION 725 

On the 25th of August, 1892. was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Ebert to Miss Lena Sprenger. daughter of Frederick and Johanna 
-Sprenger, of Ashland, Kentucky, and of this union were born six chil- 
dren,— Mathilda, Bertha M., Hilda P.. Leo. Helen K.. and Otto X.. Jr. 
Mathilda and Leo are deceased. 

Vincent F. Dillon. One of the leading educators in the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region is the present county school superintendent of Law- 
rence County, Vincent F. Dillon, who has been an enthusiastic student 
of school methods and management, is a practical educator, and has 
done much to elevate the standards of the public schools throughout tlie 
county over which he has jurisdiction. Mr. DiUon is closely identified 
with the county, not onlj' as his birthplace, but also as a successful 
farmer and at one time a merchant, and has brought to his work as 
superintendent of schools the broad vision and executive capacity of the 
successful business man. 

Vincent F. Dillon was born at Scottown, Windsor Township, Law- 
rence County, August 26, 1866. His parents were William and Rachel 
(Reed) Dillon. The father was born in Morgan County, Ohio, in 18.J8, 
was brought to Lawrence County in 1846, lived the life of a highly 
respected farmer until his death in 1909. The mother was born in 
Monroe County, Ohio, in 1835 and died in 1884. They were the parents 
of five children : Effie C, who married B. F. Snyder, a farmer in Mason 
Township, and has four children — Festus. Belva, Verda and William ; 
Vincent F. ; William A.. Avho married Ellen Lunsford and is a book- 
keeper living in Union Township, has eight children — Myrtle (deceased), 
Hillis, Cesco, Lema, Jennie, John. Bessie and Jessie, twins: Elizalieth 
L., who married Thomas Dalton, a farmer in AVest Virginia, and is the 
mother of nine children; Jennie B., who married John Fu]!^", a farmer 
of Windsor Township, and their five children are Hazel. Fleta. Dillon, 
William and Jewel. 

Vincent F. Dillon was married September 4, 1895, to Mettie Dillon, 
daughter of W^illiam Dillon, a Windsor Township farmer. Their nine 
children are Mary A., John W., Berkeley F., Leland S., Howard K., 
Rachel E., Nettie M., Venus F., and Nellie G. Mary A. and John W. 
finished the Coal Grove High School course in 1912, and John graduated 
from the Ironton High School in 1914, and several of the other children 
are still in school. 

Mr. Dillon while growing up on a farm managed to ac(|uire a liberal 
education, attending the Beech Grove school in Windsor Township until 
lie was twenty years of age, and subsequently, during the intervals of 
liis teaching, was for four terms a student in the National Normal Uni- 



726 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

^•rrsity at Lebanon, and has studied both in university and at home 
along lines that would give him special training and proficiency in his 
educational work. His career for twenty-five years has been that of 
teacher and farmer. He owned 160 acres in Lawrence County, but in 
1913 traded for a general store at South Point, and conducted that until 
June, 1914. At that time he was appointed county superintendent of 
schools for Lawrence County, and has turned over the management of 
his store to other parties. Mr. Dillon still lives in South Point, though 
his office is in Ironton, and besides his residence at South Point owns 
eighteen acres of improved farm land. 

He served as school examiner from 1911 to 1914 previous to his induc- 
tion into his present duties as superintendent. Mr. Dillon is a member 
of the Masonic Order and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, is 
a tn;stee in the ^lethodist Episcopal Church, and in politics is a democrat. 

Scott W. Wilson. A substantial contributor to the business strength 
and importance of Ironton is found in the person of Scott W. Wilson, 
who in the line of real estate and insurance has met with well-merited 
success. A man of excellent character and good business qualifications, 
his standing in the community as a citizen is of the best, and his energetic, 
progressive manner of carrying on his transactions has created a favor- 
able impression on all with whom he has come into contact. Mr. Wilson 
is a product of the farm and of Lawrence County, for he was born on 
his father's homestead in Mason Township, February 5. 1873, a son of 
James and JNIalissa (Folden) Wilson. 

James Wilson was also born in ^Nlason Township, where the family had 
l>een founded at an early day by his father, and grew up to the pui-suits 
of the soil, in which he engaged until the Civil War came on to occupy 
men's thoughts and control their actions. With other patriotic young 
men of his community he enlisted in Battery B, Ohio Light Artillery, and 
served under the flag of the Union for a little more than three years, 
participating in numerous hard-fought engagements and establishing a 
record for bravery and faithful performance of duty. AVhen his country 
no longer needed him he returned to the peaceful occupation of his 
fathers, and continued as an industrious tiller of the soil until his death. 
May 21, 1893. Malissa (Folden) Wilson was born in Walnut Township, 
Gallia County, Ohio, November 21, 1849, and still survives her husband, 
residing on the old home place in Mason township. She has been the 
mother of four children, namely: Scott W., James C, Louis G. and 
Alfred D. 

Scott W. Wilson attended the public schools of Mason Township 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 727 

until he readied the age of eighteen years, and at that time began to 
devote all his energies to farming. He was twenty-two years of age when 
he embarked in the tlireshing and sawmill business, but after four years 
disposed of his interests therein to enter his present line, that of real 
estate and insurance, in which he has met with marked success. During 
the ten years that he has been identified with this business he has built up 
a wide patronage, and at this time is the owner of seven residence proper- 
ties at Ironton, his own home at Fifth and Park Avenues, an improved 
farm of 180 acres and a handsome fruit farm in Mason Township. His 
success has been gained through no happy chance, but by virtue of his 
own hard and unflagging labor, his comprehensive knowledge of land 
and realty values and an inherent ability for his chosen line of work. 
Mr. Wilson is a valued and active member of the Chamber of Commerce. 
A republican in politics, he has never found time to actively enter public 
affairs, except as a good citizen seeking to secure strong men and good 
measures for his community. With his family, he is a member of the 
Pine Street ^lethodist Episcopal Church. 

Mr. Wilson was married September 12, 1894:, to Miss Osa Drummond, 
who died February 25, 1911, aged thirty-three years, having been the 
mother of six children : Nina M., Hobart McKinley, James 0., Ilollaee, 
Dorothea V. and Gretchen. Mr. Wilson's second marriage was to j\Iiss 
Lou Price, November 15, 1911, she being a daught<^r of Kingston and 
Julia (Preston) Price, of Johnson County, Kentucky. ]Mr. Price was a 
grocery man and a soldier of the Civil War. Mrs. Julia (Preston) Price, 
who was born in Johnson County, Kentucky, died in 1878, having been 
the mother of six children : C. Line, Alice M., Lou, Jeremiah, Kingston F., 
Jr., and Jennie. Mr. Price was married the second time to Vina Mills, 
and they became the parents of two children : Mary J. and John. Mrs. 
Price died in 1893, and ^Ir. Price was married the third time to Martha 
Maynard, who died without issue in 1913. 

Arthur and Wilmer Smith . One of the successful business enter- 
prises of Ironton is that conducted by Arthur and Wilmer Smith, 
under the firm style of Smith Brothers Company, furniture dealers. 
The brothers have experienced the vicissitudes which are liable to be 
encountered by every merchant, but have triumphed over their dis- 
couragements, and today are numbered among the successful men of the 
younger generation doing business in this flourishing city. They are 
sons of Cornelius and Amelia (Strother) Smith, the former born at 
Ironton, Ohio, in 1849, and the latter in Wayne County, Kentucky, in 
1848. The father, who spent his life as a laborer at Ironton, was- a mail 
carrier during the C'^'il War, his route lying between Ironton and Gwen- 



728 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

dolyii. There were seven children in the family, of whom three are 
deceased, the survivors being: Low D., Arthur, Wilmer and Elizabeth. 

Arthur Smith was bom at Ironton, Ohio, September 21, 1876, and 
received only ordinary educational advantages, attending the public 
schools until reaching the Seventh Grade. At that time, when but four- 
teen years of age, iie took upon his young shoulders life's responsibilities, 
becoming a laborer in the old Star Mill, where he continued for five 
years. At the end of that time, with his brothers, Low D. and Wilmer, 
he embarked in the grocery business at Ironton, but after a business life 
of four and one-half years obstacles were met which could not be over- 
i-ome and the venture failed. In 1900, nothing daunted, the brothers 
again engaged in the grocery business, and about one year later estab- 
lished a notion store on North Second Street, of which Arthur Smith had 
charge for six years. At this time Low D. Smith disposed of his interests 
to his brothers and retired from the firm, and the latter then closed out 
the grocery and notion stores and in 1910 embarked in the furniture 
business. Through able management and tireless industry, aided by the 
experience gained in their former ventures, the brothers have built up a 
prosperous business, which is constantly growing and attracting a repre- 
sentative patronage. 

^ Arthur Smith is unmarried. He is a member of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias. 
His political views are those of the democratic party, and his religious 
connection is with the First Methodist Episcopal Church. He gives the 
major part of his attention to the duties of his business, but when he can 
lay aside its cares for a time is fond of travel and hunting and is also 
a baseball enthusiast. His acquaintance is large at Ironton and his 
friends numerous. 

Wilmer Smith was born at Ironton. March 28, 1879, and like his 
l)rother only received ordinary educational advantages. When the Span- 
ish-. A iiierican War broke out he demonstrated his patriotism by enlisting 
in Company E. Seventh Regiment. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, with which 
organization he served as a private. Upon his return to civil life he 
joined his brothers in business, and his ability, resource, progressive ideas 
and energetic nature have done much to insure the success of the company 
of whicli lie is a member. Like his brother, Mr. Smith is a member of 
the First Methodist Episcopal Church and a democrat in politics, and 
like him also is a "booster" for the best interests of his native place. He 
is generally popular, as testified by a wide circle of friends. 

On ^lay 30. 1000, Wilmer Smith was married at Ironton to Miss 
Anna Hill, daughter of Lawrence Hill, and three children have been born 
to this union : Thelma L.. Richard W. and Ralph E. 



HANGING ROCK IKON REGION 729 

-loHN W. TuLGA. One of the successful business enterprises of 
Ii-onton, Ohio, is that established at Ninth and Park Avenues in 1897 
b.\- John W. Tulga. The founder, a man in but moderate circumstances 
at the time, was the best possible candidate for a successful wagon manu- 
facturer and blacksmith. He worked harder than would one of inde- 
pendent means, and he was less easy to discourage. His field of opera- 
tio]i was an advantageous one, both from the town and country stand- 
point, and from the start he pursued honorable methods and made his 
word respected and his workmanship admired. The result is a business 
wliich is not only finam-ially remunerative, but adds to the prestige of 
the community as a center of business activity. 

.Mr. Tulga is a product of Lawrence County, having been born at Etna 
Furnace, December 22, 1871, a son of John H. and Annie (Speckman) 
Tulga. The father was born at Pine (Jrove, Lawrence County, a member 
of an old and honored family of the Hanging Rock Region, in 1848, and 
has passed his life in the peaceful pursuit of tilling the soil, in which 
lie lias earned a competence that now allows him to live in comfortable 
j-etirement at his home at Sedgwick. He married Mrs. Annie (Speck- 
man ) Saunders, a widow, wlio was born in 1842, at Metropolis, Illinois, 
and had one child by her former marriage: Henry E. John H. and 
Annie Tulga became the parents of five children, namely: John H., Jr., 
Jolm W.. Amelia, IMary and Anne. 

John W. Tulga was a student at the public schools of fronton until 
reaching the age of fourteen years, at which time he took his place among 
the world's workers as an employe of the nail mill. He was industrious 
and enterprising, but found that his wages were but small, and in order 
to better his condition learned the trade of blacksmith, at which he 
worked at the old Olive Street wagon works for a period of nine years. 
It had been always his ambition to be the proprietor of a business of his 
own, and this ambition he gratified in 1897, when he started in a small 
way to manufacture wagons at Ninth and Park Avenues. To his original 
l)laiit he has constantly added as the steady increase of patronage has 
flemaiuled, and he now has one of the most modern plants in this section, 
fully equipped with the most highly improved machinery known to the 
business. He is the owner of both plant and property, which with stock 
and equipment are valued between $20,000 and $25,000. Mr. Tulga is 
well known to the dealers in his line of business and is a valued member 
of the Tri-State Retail Carriage Dealers Association. He belongs to the 
Chamber of Commerce, and has a well-established reputation generally 
in commercial circles. Mr. Tulga is well known as a driver and as an 
excellent judge of horse-flesh. He is a repul)lican in his political views, 
but has not let political affairs interfere with his business. With his 



730 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

family, he attends the Emanuel Church, and resides in his own pleasant 
residence at No. 212 Park Avenue. 

"Sir. Tulga was married April 26, 1899, at the home of the bride at 
Ironton, to Miss Elizabeth Zimmermann, daughter of Valentine and 
Sophia Zimmermann, of this city, retired farming people of Lawrence 
County. Mr. and Mrs. Tulga have one child : Raymond H., who is 
attending school. 

AViLLiAM J. DoRAN. One of the successful business men of Ironton, 
William J. Doran, secretary, treasurer and manager of the Crystal Ice 
Company, has illustrated in his career the opportunities that are present- 
ing themselves to the men of today who are possessed of enterprise and 
initiative, have the ability and are not afraid of hard, persistent labor. 
He was given only ordinary advantages in his youth, but made the most 
of them, and the success which has come to him is but the merited reward 
of well-directed effort. Mr. Doran is a native of Ohio, born at Ports- 
mouth, Scioto County, December 27, 1868, Kis parents being Michael and 
Erma (Schuh) Doran. 

Michael Doran was born in Pennsylvania, in 1846, and in .yoiuig man- 
hood came to Ohio, locating at Portsmouth, where he became a puddler 
in the mills. He was a quiet, unassuming citizen, spent his life in indus- 
trious labor, and died in 1912, at the age of sixty-six years. ^Irs. Doran, 
who was born in Germany in 1848, came to this country in young woman- 
hood, and still survives her husband, being a resident of Ironton. There 
were ten children in the family : William J., Ida, Emma C, Mary, 
Thomas T., Estella, Frank, Rose, Edward P. and Francis D., of whom 
Thomas T. and Frank are deceased. 

William J. Doran was educated in the parochial school of St. Law- 
rence Catholic Church, which he attended until thirteen years of age, 
and at that time took his place among the world 's workers as an employe 
of the puddling department at the iron mills. He was thus engaged for 
five years and then became a laborer at the ice plant, where, during the 
following twelve years, he gained much valuable experience in the line 
of ice-making machinery. Succeeding this he went to Jackson, Jackson 
County, Ohio, where he had the supervision of the building of an ice 
plant, and this he managed for one year, then returning to Ironton to 
attend Davidson's Business College. After six months in that school, 
Mr. Doran went to Cincinnati, Ohio, where he became chief engineer at 
the Knox Ice Company's plant, but after one and one-half years again 
came to Ironton. Here he became manager of the Crystal Ice Company, 
and in 1907 purchased stock in the business and was elected secretary and 
treasurer, positions he has continued to hold. Through Mr. Doran 's good 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 731 

management and ability to make the most of opportunities, the business 
has enjoyed a steady and healthy growth, and is now justly regarded as 
one of the substantial enterjjrises of Ironton. ]\Ir. Doran is widely ex- 
perienced in his chosen vocation, is known as an expert operator of ice 
making machinery and is held in the highest confidence by his associates. 
The duties of his business have been such as to demand his attention to 
the exclusion of other matters, but he has neglected no opportunity to 
demonstrate his interest in his community 's welfare. In political matters 
he supports the candidates of the democratic party. He is a member of 
St. Lawrence Catholic Church, and for some time has been its treasurer. 
^Ir. Doran is unmarried. 

William H. Heiner has developed a most successful nursery and 
market-gardening business at Ironton, Lawrence County, where he has 
a well improved tract of nine and one-half acres, devoted largely to truck 
gardening, but special attention being now given to the propagating 
of seeds and bulbs for food products rather than in the line of Horicnl- 
ture. ]\Ir. Heiner is one of the progressive and loyal citizens of Iron- 
ton and takes vital interest in all that touches its welfare and advance- 
ment. He is a valued member of the city council at the present time and 
has received other marks of popular confidence and esteem. 

Mr. Heiner was born at Allegheny City, now known simply as Alle- 
gheny, in Pittsburgh County, Pennsylvania, on the 24th of September, 
1853, and is a son of George and Magdalene (Hefner) Heiner, the former 
of whom was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, in 1811. and 
the latter of whom was born in the ancient City of Strasburg, capital of 
Alsace-Lorraine, Germany, in 1823, her native province having been 
still a part of French territory at the time of her birth and having pa.ssed 
to German control as a result of the Franco-Prussian War. Of the ten 
children six are living, and the names of the entire number are indicated, 
in respective order of birth and with proper noting of those who have 
passed away: George (deceased), Caroline, William H., Louisa (de- 
ceased), Elizalieth, Magdalene (deceased), Henry, Sarah, ]\Iary, and 
Edward (deceased). The father, George Heiner, immigrated with his 
wife to America in 1853 and after passing about one year in the State of 
Pennsylvania he came to Ohio, in 1854, and established his home at Iron- 
ton, as one of the sterling pioneers of Lawrence County. He purchased 
the tract of land on a part of which his son AVilliam H., of this review, 
now lives at 3803 South Third Street, and here he continued to apply 
himself earnestly and industriously to market gardening until his death, 
in 1872, his wife surviving him by more than thirty years and having 



732 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

IxH'ii called to the life eternal in 1905, at the venerable age of eighty-two 
yc-ars. 

William H. Ileiner attended the public schools of Ironton until he 
had attained to the age of seventeen years, and thereafter he worked for 
his father until the latter 's death, about two years later. He then 
assumed the management of the home place, in the interest of the entire 
family, and thus continued his labors until about 1880, when the estate 
was settled and the heirs given their pi'oper apportionment. In the final 
adjustment Mr. Heiner assumed heavy responsibilities, as he purchased 
the home place and paid the other heirs, and in the intervening years he 
has achieved unequivocal success, gained through zealous industry and 
good management, which have placed him in independent financial 
status. He has added somewhat to the area of the old homestead, to meet 
the demands of his business, and now has about nine and one-half acres 
of ground, improved with model hot-beds and otherwise excellently 
etjuipped for the market-gardening and nursery business. For a number 
of years Mr. Ileiner gave more or less attention to work at the carpenter's 
trade, and his ability in this trade is indicated by his membership in the 
i-avpenters" union. He is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias, holds 
membership in the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, and both he and his 
wife are members of the Pres1)yterian Church. Mr. Heiner has made 
excellent improvements on his residence property, and he is the owner 
also of the building utilized as a store. 

Mr. Heiner shows characteristic loyalty and progressiveness in his 
I'tt'ective service as a member of the city council, to which he was first 
elected in 1911. Popular appreciation of his labors in this municipal 
body, to which he was chosen from the cit}' at large rather than from a 
specific ward, was shown in his re-election, by a gratifying majority, in 
191.3. He was formerly a member of the board of trustees of the Law- 
rence County Infirmary, having been for two years clerk of the board 
ami for an equal period its pi^esident. His political allegiance is given to 
the republican party and he is well fortified in his opinions concerning 
governmental affairs, both local and national. 

It is worthy of record that in 1877, when he was twenty-four years 
of age, Mr. Heiner found an eft'ective means of recuperating his impaired 
liealth, by making the long overland trip, with horse and wagon, to South- 
ern Florida. Another young man accompanied him on the journey and 
they traversed a distance of 3,000 miles, ninety days being consumed ere 
tiiey reached their destination, and the return trip being made by 
lailroad. 

At Ironton. on llie 26tli of April, 1887, Mr. Heiner wedded Miss Caro- 
line K. Ensinger, ilaughter of Christopher and Katharine A. Ensinger, 



HANG TNG ROCK IRON REGION 733 

both natives of Germany, where the former was born in 1830, and the 
latter in 1832. Mrs. Heiner was the fifth in order of birth of the family 
of eleven children, the others being Mary B., Wilhelmina (deceased). 
(ieorge W., Agnes (deceased), Emma D., William F., Rosa R., Charles E., 
and Pi-ank A. and John J., who are deceased. Christopher Ensinger was 
a pioneer of Lawrence County, and here conducted the well known Old 
Reliable Dairy from 1859 until his death, i^i 1907, his wife having passed 
to the life eternal in 1905. Tie was one of a company of fifteen enter- 
l)vising citizens who first introduced into Lawrence County the pure-bred 
and registered IIolstein-Frisian cattle, and he became an extensive and 
successful breeder of this fine type of stock, his fine herd having been a 
source of mucli pride to him and the same having attracted much atten- 
lioii on the part of ])reedcrs and farmers. iMr. Ensinger was an influential 
and honored citizen and served in various offices of lo'Cal trust, including 
many years' incumbency of the position of director of the county in- 
firmary. Mv. and Mrs. lleiner became the parents of two children, — 
Chester E.. who died at the age of 11 months; and Karl W., who is 
engaged in the grocery business in the City of Cincinnati: he married 
^liss Garnet i^i'imstead and they have no children. 

Oliver C. O'Nioii.i.. M. I). Well foilified in teclmical skill and in 
unfaltering (h'votion to his exacting and humane profession, Dr. O'Neill 
holds place as one of the i-epreseiitative physicians and surgeons engaged 
in |)i'actice in tlie City of Ironton. tlie capital and metropolis of Law- 
icnce County, 'riieic is distinctive satisfaction in noting his professional 
and civic status l)y reason of his being a juitive son of the county which 
is still his home, and he is a rei)i-esentati\ e of an old and honored family 
of this scctio]! of the State. 

Dr. O'Neill was boi-n in Mason Townsiiip. Lawrence ('ounty, Ohio, on 
tile 1st of March. 1870, and is a son of AVilliam and Rhuama (Wymer) 
O'Neill, the I'onner of whom was born in ^lonroe County, this State, in 
1S25, a memliei' of a. family, of Irish lineage, that was founded in this 
commonwealth in the pioneei- days, and the lattei* of whom was born in 
.Morgan County, on the '.U\ of March, 18:^4: she is one of the venerable 
and loved pioneer women of Lawrence County anti still resides on the old 
hoiiu'stead farm in Mason Township, where her husband died in his 
eightieth yeai*. secure in tlie high esteem of all who knew him. William 
O'Neill devoted virtually his enlii-e active career to the basic industry of 
agriculture, of which he was long a i)rosperous and representative exjio- 
nent ill Lawience County, and to him was due also the honor of having 
sei'ved as a defender of the Cnion in the Civil Wai'. He eidisted as a 
jH'ivatc in Comjiany F. One llundrefl and Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer 



734 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Infantry, and his term of service comprised about tifteen months, at tlie 
expiration of which he received his honorable discharge, his continued 
interest in his old comrades having been indicated in later years by his 
affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic. William and Rhuauia 
(Wyuier) O'Neill became the parents of six children, the names of whom 
are here entered, in the respective order of birth: John W., George W., 
Enola A., Palmer, Nelson W. and Oliver U. Of the number Enola A., 
p]lmer and Nelson W. are deceased. 

To the public schools of his native county Dr. O'Neill is indebted for 
his early educational training, and he had the good fortune or wisdom 
to make proper jDreliminary provision for the responsibilities and intel- 
lectual demands that were to be placed upon him in the profession of his 
choice, for he did not neglect that all important feature of adequate 
academic training as a prerequisite of that of technical order. After a 
course in the Ohio Northern Normal University, at Ada, Hardin County, 
the Doctor devoted four years to successful teaching in the pul)lic schools 
of his native State, and in preparation for his chosen profession he was 
matriculated in the medical department of the University of Louisville, 
Kentucky, in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1897 
and from which he received his degree of Doctor of JMedicine, his assiduity 
and ambition as a student having been on a parity with those thai he 1ms 
exemplified in the active work of his profession. 

The professional novitiate of Dr. O'Neill was served in his native 
township, where he estal)lished himself in practice with residence head- 
quarters in tlie village of Wilgus. He soon emerged from the ranks of 
the tyros of his chosen calling and developed a substantial practice, to 
which he continued to devote his attention for three years. For three 
months thereafter he was located at Valley View, Madison County, 
Kentucky, and he then returned to Lawrence County and passed nine 
months in practice at Aid. In V.)0o he transferred his residence and 
professional head(iuarters to the city of Ii'onto]i, and here he has lived up 
most fully to the larger a)ui more exacting duties devolving upon him l)otK 
as a pliysician and as a progressive and public-spirited citizen. He lias 
served as coi'oner of liis county for four years and was re-eleeted in 1014 
for anotlier two yeai's in that office. He lias a substantial and re])resi'nta- 
tive i)ractice, and its scope and impoi'tance best vouch for his abilily and 
personal popularity in the counly that has always represented his home. 

Dr. O'Neill is actively identified with the Lawrence Counly .Medical 
Society, the Ohio State [Medical Society and the American .Aledical .\ssn- 
ciation. He is ser\'iiig at the present time not only as county coi'oiiei' but 
also as secretary of the Lawrence County Board of United States Pension 
Examining Surgeons. The Doctor is aligned as a loyal sujiporlei' of lln' 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 735 

l»riiu-iples of the republican party, both he and his wife are zealous 
uienibers of the Pine Street Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is affili- 
ated with the local organizations of the Knights of Pythias, Knights of 
the Golden Eagle, and Junior Order of United American Mechanics. 
His attractive residence, at the corner of South Third and Walnut Streets, 
is owned by the Doctor, and he owns another residence property, on 
Fourth Street, as well as a block devoted to business and residence- 
ai)artnients, on South Third Street. He is a directer of the South Side 
]>uilding. Loan & Savings Company. 

On the 22d of December, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
O'Neill to Miss Ida Mae Ruth, daughter of George and Maria Ruth, of 
Portsmouth, Scioto County, both parents being now deceased. Dr. and 
i\Irs. O'Neill became the parents of three children, the first born having 
Itei'ii Collis AV.. who died in childhood. Ruth and Stanley P. remain at 
the i)arental liome and add to its attractions as a center of gracious 
hosi)itality. 

PKTf:R K. Fink. Among- the business men of the Hanging Rock and 
Calumet Region who are winning success through individual effort and 
are ■■ontributing to the industrial development of this prosperous section 
of Ohio, Peter K. Funk, superintendent of the lasting department of 
tile Excelsior Shoe Company, is deserving of mention. His entire busi- 
ness career has been passed with the company with which he is now 
idt'iititied. and his present position has been gained by steadfast and 
coiiscientious effort, as he entered its employ at the bottom of the ladder. 

Mr. Funk was born at Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio, September 
2i». 1H76, and is a son of Theodore K. and Emma Dora (King) Funk. 
His father was born at Arabia, Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1848, and as 
a young man adopted the profession of law, in which he is still engaged 
at Portsmouth. He is well and favorably known among the lawyers of 
Scioto County, and has served two terms as prosecuting attorney. Mrs. 
Funk was born at Portsnxoutli in 1856 and has been the mother of six 
children : Peter K., p]lizabetli. Ada P., Laura B., Sarah and James W.. 
of whom Sarah is now deceased. 

IN'ter K. Funk went to tlie public schools of Portsmouth until lie had 
coiiiplcled tlie Fourth Grade, and then became a student in the county 
s liools under Professor Lowe. It was his youthful intention to adopt 
bis tatli(i''s calling, and at the age of nineteen years he began to reail 
hiw under the jjreceptorship of the elder man, but after two years the 
Spanisli-.\iiie)'iean War came on and ]\Ir. Funk enlisted in Company II. 
Fourth Re.uiment. Ohio ^''olunteer Infantry, with which he saw active 
service in Porto Rico for two months. Enlisting as a i)rivate, he won 



736 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

promotion through hrave and faithful service, and was honorably dis- 
charged as lieutenant of his company. On his return from his military 
service Mr. Punk entered the Portsmouth plant of the Excelsior Shoe 
Company as a laborer, but his recognized abilities and industrious labor 
won him advancement, and in 1906 he was made superintendent of the 
lasting department of the plant at Ironton, a position he has continued 
to capably fill to the present time. He enjoys the utmost confideniL-e of 
the officials of the company and has the I'espect and regard of the men in 
liis department. 

Mr. Funk was married October 26, 1900. at the home of the bride at 
Portsmouth, to Miss ^lae Dora AVilliamson, daughter of Capt. William 
and Mary (Hunt) Williamson. They are consistent members of the 
Episcopal Church and reside at No. 126 P^tna street, Ironton, while Mr. 
Punk also owns a residence at Portsmouth. He spends a great deal of his 
leisure time in reading and in studying machinery, although he is also 
fond of outdoor sports, notably fishing and hunting. Mr. Punk is a 
republican and a member of the Independent Oixler of Poresters and of 
the Spanish-American War Vetei'ans. ^Irs. Punk was born at Red River, 
Arkansas, where her parents dieil when she was a cliiUl, and she was 
adopted by Capt. and .Mrs. Williaiiison. 

RoscoE S. Wiseman. .\n Ironton citizen wliose p-dit has been quietly 
and efficiently j)erfonrie(l and who is one of the most popular men in that 
city is Roscoe S. Wiseman, now assistant postmaster. .\ great many 
people of Lawrence County know bini best for liis I'fficient work as an 
educator, a profession which he followed for a iuind)er of years. 

Roscoe S. Wiseman was born in Lawrence County, August 22, lcS66. 
a son of Will)er W. and .Martha ( .\i'msti'ong ) Wiseman. His fatlier, 
who was born in Virginia in LS2S, <'aiae to Lawrence County, Ohio, when 
a boy, followed fai-ming with substantial success and i)assed away in 
1899. The mothei- was boni in ijawrence Count\- iji 18:!2 and died in 
1893. They were pai-ents of a lai'ge family of fourteen childi'eii, foui- 
of whom died in infancy, while Ihe othei' ten are mentioned as follows: 
Thomas ()., Sarah A., .\rnniita K.. Charles A., .Margaret L.. Ros-oe S.. 
Ada A., Emma P.. -lames ]M.. Louis W. 

It was the ambition of Mr. Wiseman when a boy to get a liberal 
ediu-ation and make himself usefnl in the wofld. Prom the comnKin 
schools of Lawrence County he tMitered the .National .Xoi-mal rniveisity 
at Lel)anon, was a student there until graduating in 1892 and has cei'tili- 
cate of graduation in the teachei-s. the business and the scientific courses. 
Por twelve years his woi'k was in the schooli-oom, and dui'ing the last 
tive vears chieHy in Noi-nud School woi'k and as an insti-uctor in summer 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 737 

schools. Since August 20, 1903, Mr. Wiseman lias been assistant post- 
master, and was appointed by Mr. J. B. Stoble. No one understands so 
thoroughly all the details of that office as Mr. Wiseman, and his efficient 
work has done a great deal to popularize the postal department with the 
citizens of Ironton. 

On September 20, 1893, Mr. AViseman married Lorena Stewart, a 
daughter of 0. P. Stewart of Lawrence County. Their five children are 
Elizabeth I., Merrill R., Oliver M., Elmer S. and Wilber L. Mr. AVise- 
man has affiliations with the Knights of Pythias and the Modern Wood- 
men of America, is a republican in politics, and belongs to the First 
Baptist Church of Ironton. It should also be said that Mr. Wiseman is 
regarded as the champion checker player in the state of Ohio. Outside 
of his official duties he finds recreation occasionally in fishing and hunt- 
ing, but most of his time is divided between his office and his home. He 
is the owner of a good residence in Ironton. 

Henry J. Scherer. A business concern at Ironton which has stood 
for good service and progressive principles for a number of years is 
that of Scherer Bros., roofers, tinners and plumbers at 313 South Third 
street. The business has been in existence for a period of about forty 
years, and Henry J. Scherer is now one of the brothers who took over 
the concern, which had been founded by their father and later managed 
by their mother, and by tlieir united energies have given it a more than 
local prestige. 

Henry J. Scherer was born at Ironton October 29. 1870. His father, 
IMichael M. Scherer, born in Germany in 1824, learned his trade of tinner, 
and established a shop at Ironton about 1874. He continued business 
until his death in 1882. Alichael Scherer married Constance Deitrich. 
who was born in Chillieothe, Ohio, in 1831, and died in 1913. Their 
eight children were AVilliam M., Ellen, Jacob F., Pauline (deceased). 
Henry J., Mary, Frank B. and Caroline. 

Henry J. Scherer was educated in St. Joseph's parochial school until 
fourteen years of age, then learned the tinner's trade under his father, 
was employed as journeyman workman by the senior Scherer, and when 
his mother took over the management of the business continued as her 
right-hand man until her death. He and his brother Frank then bought 
out the enterprise, and have since conducted it under their name as 
Scherer Bros. The shop, stock and material are valued at about five 
thousand dollars, and they do a general roofing and metal business, also 
plumbing and steam fitting, and have handled man}^ of the important 
contracts throughout the Hanging Rock Iron Region. 

Mr. Scherer was married on April 15, 1895, at Ironton, to Rosie 



738 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

Ilauliert, daughter of Nicholas Haubert, a Lawrence County farmer. 
Their three children are Edith, Ethel and Milton. Mr. Scherer, with his 
family, is a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, of St. George's 
Association, is a republican in politics, and a member of the Ironton 
Chamber of Commerce. He owns his home at 438 South Fifth street, 
and a half interest in a piece of business property on South Third street. 
While his business has al)sorbed most of his attention, ]\Ir. Scherer takes 
liis pleasure in outdoor life, in fishing and hunting, and is especially fond 
of a fox hunt. Both he and his brothers started in life as poor men, and 
have gained prosperity as a result of hard work and close attention to 
))usiness. 

Oscar E. Kixkead. An example of the thrift and progressiveness 
that have combined to make Ironton one of the most thriving business 
communities of the Planging Rock Region is the dry cleaning establish- 
ment of Oscar E. Kinkead, located at Third and Wyanoke streets. This 
enterprise was commenced in a modest manner, but has grown steadily 
since its inception, attracting a wide and representative trade by reason 
of the excellent business ability and good management of its proprietor. 
Mr. Kinkead was born at Ashland, Kentucky, February 24, 1860, and is 
a son of William and Susan E. (Haskill) Kinkead. On the maternal side 
he belongs to one of the oldest families of Lawrence County, being 
descended from one of the pioneers of the Hanging Rock Region, James 
Haskill, the founder of the town of Haskillville. William Kinkead was 
raised on the old Kinkead homestead place in Kentucky, and was reared 
to agricultural pursuits, but subsecjuently turned his attention to mer- 
chandising and was thus engaged at the time of his death in 1864. Mrs. 
Kinkead was born at Haskillville, Lawrence County, Ohio, and died in 
1910, at the age of sixty-eight years. She was married a second time, 
to O. J. Chalmers, of ]\Iarietta, Ohio, and had one son : Dr. J. H. Chal- 
mers, a practicing physician of Cincinnati, Ohio. Oscar E. Kinkead is 
the only child born to his parents' union. 

Oscar F. Kinkead was afforded good educational advantages in his 
youth, attending the schools of Ashland, Kentucky, until reaching the 
age of twenty-one years. At that time he engaged in a general mer- 
chandising business at Forrestdale, Ohio, at which place he continued 
to operate for three years, and then went south to Tennessee, where he 
was in the stock and fruit business until 1900. In that year Mr. Kinkead 
disposed of his interests in the South and returned to his Ashland home, 
where he received his introduction to his present line of business, carry- 
ing on a dry cleaning establishment there for six years. Desiring a 
broader field for his activities, Mr. Kinkead next came to Ironton, where 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 739 

he purchased property and built his present plant, at Third and Wyan- 
oke streets, which he has fitted up with the best and most modern 
machinery to be secured, and the property is now valued at $3,500. Mr. 
Kinkead's success may be said to be in large part due to the personal 
attention which he gives to every detail of his business and his policy of 
giving full value for every dollar. He bears an excellent reputation in 
business circles as a man who exercises fidelity in all of his engagements. 
Aside from his business, Mr. Kinkead takes great interest in apple and 
other fruit growing, and owns a farm on which he spends much of his 
spare time. He is also the owner of his residence at No. 1248 South 
Third street. 

Mr. Kinkead was married to Miss Elizabeth Heiner, daughter of 
George Heiner, a gardener of Ironton, at her home in this city, December 
24, 1885. One child has been born to this union : Eva Lina, who mar- 
ried John INIcQuaid, who is now engaged in business with his father-in- 
law. Mr. Kinkead is a member of the Jr. 0. U. A. M., and of the First 
Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a republican in politics, and serves 
as a member of the school board. Mr. Kinkead also holds membership 
in the Chamber of Commerce. 

George T. McNARy. The thriving industrial city of Ironton, Law- 
rence County, claims as one of its representative business men and pro- 
gressive citizens Mr. McNary, and special interest attaches to his stand- 
ing in the community by reason of his being a native of the county in 
which he has achieved noteworthy success. 

Mr. McNary was born in the little village of Sedwick, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, on the 4th of April, 1876, and is a son of William and 
Eleanor (AVoods) McNary, the former of whom was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1842, and the latter of whom was born at Steubenville, Jefferson 
County, Ohio, in 1840, as a member of a sterling pioneer family of that 
section of the state. William McNary was reared and educated in the 
old Keystone State and came to Ohio about the year 1870. Soon after his 
marriage he settled on a farm near Sedwick, Lawrence County, and he 
became one of the substantial agriculturists and influential citizens of 
that part of the county. He continued his residence in Lawrence County 
until his death, which occurred in 1902, his devoted wife having been 
summoned to eternal rest in 1911. Of the six children the eldest is Elmer, 
who is engaged in the real-estate business in the City of St. Louis, Mis- 
souri; Minnie is a skilled stenographer and is employed as such in the 
City of Ironton; George T. is the immediate subject of this review; 
Erwin E. is individually mentioned on other pages of this work; Wilbur 
is a physician and surgeon by profession and is engaged in practice in 



740 HANGING BOCK IRON REGION 

the City of East St. Louis. Illinois; and Margaret is employed as a stenog- 
rapher, at I ronton. 

George T. MeNary is indebted to the public schools of Lawrence 
County for his early educational advantages, which included those of 
the Ironton High School. He left school at the age of seventeen years 
and lie then became identified with the operations of the iron furnaces and 
incidental enterprises in Lawrence County. After a period of eleven 
months' service he was promoted to the position of assistant superin- 
tendent, and he continued to be actively concerned with this important 
line of industry for nine years in Lawrence County, and for the ensuing 
decade he was identitied with the wire and nail .department of the Belfort 
Iron & Nail Company. Later he held for nine months a position as 
machinist in tlie works of the Ironton Engine Company, and in March, 
1914, he engaged in the retail grocery business in his present attractive 
and eligible quarters, at 979 South Third street, where his personal 
popularity and the etfective service given have gained to him a substan- 
tial and appreciative patronage. 

In politics Mr. McNary gives his allegiance to the republican party, 
both he and liis wife hold, membership in the Presbyterian Church and 
he holds membei-ship in the Ironton Chamber of Commerce. His long 
association with the iron industry in this section of the state has made 
]\Ir. ^IcNary familiar with all details of this line of enterprise, in which 
he still continues to take much interest and the value of which as a con- 
tribution to the general well-being of the community he fully appreciates. 
He is the owner of a residence property in his native town of Sedwick. 

On the 2oth of March, 1900, :\Ir. McNary wedded i\Iiss Effie Kinkaid 
daughter of John and Kate Kinkaid, of Ironton, and the two children 
of this union are Georgia Eleanor and ]\lildred ^lay. 

Francis Edwix Hayward. In fertility of resource, in the practical 
application of every scientific force, in genius of organization and in 
breadth of operation, America leads the woi'ld. Ohio and the Middle 
^Yest have not failed to supply their due quota of minds rich in natural 
faculties to the long list of American men of ability, and the subject of the 
present review, Francis Edwin Hayward, of Ironton, has well won a 
place on the roll of successful promoters and manufacturers. Mr. Hay- 
ward was born ]\Iay 13, 1848, in the Lower French Grant, Scioto County, 
Ohio, and is a son of Eliphaz Hayward and IMary (Cadot) Hayward, 
and a grandson of Closes Hayward and Claudius Cadot. 

The boyhood and youth of Francis Edwin Hayward were passed at the 
place of his nativity, his early education being secured in the public 
schools, this being subsequently supplemented by a course at Duff's Com- 




■■» r 



#^ Jl' 




(2M//^-- 




HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 741 

luei'c'ial College, at Pittsburgli, wliere he was graduated in 1870. He began 
his business career as a salesman of Singer sewing machines for George D. 
Selby, his territory being Lawrence and Jackson counties, Ohio, and the 
success which he gained in this line of endeavor leads him to regard it 
as the most notable achievement, all things considered, in his long and 
uniformly successful career. Succeeding this, IMr. Hayward spent three 
years in the mercantile department of the Los Gatos Manufacturing 
Company, of Los Gatos, California, and in the spring of 1871 returned to 
Ohio and established hiin.self in the retail grocery business at Ironton, 
an enterprise with which he was identitied for a period of twenty-six 
years, merging it into the exclusive wholesale grocery business with Drake 
S. ]\Iurdock, ^larch 26, 1900. For a long period of years he was a director 
in the Ironton Fire Brick Company, was its secretary and treasurer for 
t'ighteen years, and eventually became its president, a position which he 
held until 1903, when, because of ill health, he sold the two plants at 
Ironton and Hayward, Carter County, Kentucky, together witli his 
mineral lands, to the Ashland Fire Brick Company, of which he became 
vice-president. At the time of the death of the president, S. S. Savage, 
in 1904, he was prevailed upon to accept the presidency of the concern, 
l)ut in 1906 resigned from that position, sold his fire brick interests and 
retired from active business. ^Ir. Hayward then took his wife and 
daughter to California, where he spent four months, and since returning 
to Ironton, in 1907, has devoted his attention to the handling of stock 
and various other local investments. IMr. Hayward has long been greatly 
interested in l)usiness and financial enterprises at Ironton, and to their 
upbuilding has given the benefit of his broad experience, able manage- 
ment and shrewd business judgment. He is a stockliolder and director 
in the First National Bank of Ironton, of which he was vice-president 
for six years, a stockholder and director in the Ironton Portland Cement 
Company, a}id was formerly .secretary of the Lawrence Telephone Com- 
pany. One of his most notable achievements is the brick plant at 
Hayward, Carter County, Kentucky, which he erected in 1900. This 
became known as one of the most remarkable ventures of its kind in the 
I'ountry, because of the ease with which it was operated and the cheap- 
ness of production, and is still known as one of the most perfect plants 
of its kind to be found. Although now somewhat retired from the activi- 
ties and worries of business life, Mr. Hayward continues to be a force 
and an acknowledged power in whatever movement he engages in. 
As a citizen he has done much to advance the best interests of Ironton, 
and his name is synonymous with strict integrity, business probity and 
public-spirited citizenship. In political matters he is an uncompro- 
mising republican. 



742 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

On January 28, 1874, Mr. Hayward was married to Miss Julia A. 
Work, and three children have been born to this union, as follows : Frank 
Roy, who was four years with John Wanamaker and became assistant 
superintendent of the great department store of Siegel, Cooper & Com- 
pany, of New York City ; Claude Cadot, who was an attorney of Ironton, 
was with the law firm of Belcher & Hayward for a time and is now 
sales manager for the Ashland Fire Brick Co., of Ashland, Kentucky; 
and Mary Elizabeth, who resides with her parents. 

Oscar Wiehle. Among Ironton 's flourishing business houses, one 
which contributes materially to the importance of this city in manu- 
facturing lines is Wiehle Brothers Soap Works, an enterprise which 
has been developed under the capable management of Oscar Wiehle. 
Mr. Wiehle has been identified with this line of business throughout his 
career, and is thoroughly experienced in every detail of soap-making, 
while his superior executive ability is evidenced by the high reputation 
in which the firm is held. He was born at Ripley, Brown County, Ohio, 
September 22, 1867, and is a son of Robert and Frances (Liebert) Wiehle. 

Robert Wiehle was born in Germany in 1836, and was a lad of eleven 
years when he accompanied his parents to the United States, the family 
settling first at Detroit, Michigan, where he secured his education and 
grew to manhood. In 1860 he removed to Ripley, Ohio, and engaged in 
the manufacture of soap, and subsequently came to Ironton, where he 
continued in business until his retirement in 1903. His death occurred 
November 18, 1913, when Ironton lost one of its energetic and able busi- 
ness men and public-spirited citizens. Mrs. AViehle was born at Ports- 
mouth, Scioto County, Ohio, in 1855, and died at Ironton in 1903. She 
had been the mother of seven children, as follows: Oscar, William, 
Edward, Elmer, Hildegarde, Mary and Frances, of whom the last two 
are deceased. 

Oscar Wiehle was educated in the public and high schools, which he 
attended until reaching the age of sixteen years, and at that time entered 
his father's business as a factory hand, thus working his way up through 
the various departments of the industry and thoroughly familiarizing 
himself with every detail. In 1892 the father and sons organized an 
independent company known as the Wiehle Soap Company, with a capital 
stock of $25,000. This business continued to carry on operations success- 
fully until 1903, when, the father desiring to retire, the factory was sold 
and the affairs of the company settled up. After a short period the sons 
organized the present venture, Wiehle Brothers Soap Works, which has 
continued in successful operation, the plant and stock at this time being 
conservatively valued at $10,000. While Mr. Wiehle devotes the greater 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 743 

part of his interest to the soap business, he is also connected with other 
enterprises, being a stockholder in the Ironton Engine Company. Among 
his associates he is known as an exceptionally capable business man, pro- 
gressive in his ideas and enterprising in his actions. 

Mr. Wiehle is single. He is independent in his political views and 
has not sought public office, although any movement that affects his com- 
munity at once enlists his interest. He belongs to the Chamber of Com- 
merce and to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious 
connection is with the German Reforined Church. He has always been 
fond of travel, and generally passes the winter months in this form of 
pleasure, either in Cuba or Florida. 

Charles A. IIumphryes. One of the best-known and most success- 
ful men in his own particular line of endeavor in Ohio, Charles A. 
Humphryes, of Ironton, is one of the earliest settlers of the Hanging 
Rock Region, and although much of his life has been spent outside of its 
borders he is valued as a helpful citizen and as a man who through his 
own achievements has contributed to the importance and prestige of the 
community in which he now makes his home. Mr. Humphryes was born 
in Pike County, Missouri, November 2, 1852, and is a son of William G. 
and Diana (Reekmann) Humphryes. 

William G. Humphryes was a native of the old State of Virginia, 
where he was born in 1827, and there grew up amid agricultural sur- 
roundings, so that in his youth he adopted the vocation of farmer. 
In 1857 he removed to Bloom Furnace, Scioto County, Ohio, and for 
some years engaged in teaming around the iron furnaces, but in later 
life went to Jackson, the county seat of Jackson County, Ohio, and there 
passed away in 1895. Mr. Humphryes was married to Miss Diana Beek- 
mann, who was born in Ohio in 1830, and she died in 1869, having been 
the mother of seven children : Ellen, Charles A., James A., Annie, 
Asbury J., May and a child which died in infancy. Mr. Humphryes was 
subsequently married to INIargaret Williams, a widow, who survives and 
makes her home at Jackson, and three children were born to them: 
Benjamin, AVilliam and Walter. 

Charles A. Humphryes received only limited educational advantages 
in his youth, attending the Scioto County public schools until he was 
eleven years old and at that early age entering upon life's responsibilities 
as a worker in the mines. He was thus employed until reaching the age 
of seventeen, when he became assistant engineer to old John Loomis, who 
had charge of the machinery at Bloom Furnace, and under his guidance 
received his first instruction in the line in which he was to gain his 
success in life. After remaining three years in this capacity, Mr. 



744 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

IIuiniDliryes became assistant eiigiiieiT at the Scioto Furnace, where he 
remained one year, and then spent a like period as engineer at the 
l)U('khorn Furnace, following which he became engineer for the iron and 
steel plant Iw-ated at Ironton, and was so engaged three years. This was 
followed by a similar period in the same capacity at the Big Etna Fur- 
nace, and one year at the Cami^bell Sarah Furnace, this being succeeded 
l)y four years at the Hanging Rock Furnace. In 1890 Mr. Humphryes 
became identified with the American AVater and Guarantee Company, 
of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, as constructing engineer, and for nearly a 
(juarter of a century was in charge of the water works at Little Rock, 
Arkansas. Yir. Humphryes is an expert in the placing, construction and 
perfecting of water works and equipment, particularly in the line of 
filtration plants, and at this time has two patents on filtration improve- 
ments which are meeting with uiuch favor among constructing engineers 
all over the country. He has made a specialty of putting in water works 
machinery, and although he is now somewhat retired from active business 
life, is still frequentlj' called into considtation in the installing of impor- 
tant and difficult plants. 

Mr. Humpiiryes was married at Ironton, Noveml)er 2, 1878, to 3Iiss 
]\Iaria Lanton, daughter of Edward Lanton of this city, and five children 
have been born to this union : Edward, who is general superintendent 
of the water works at Little Rock, Arkansas, married Pearl Horschell, 
and has one child — Edward, Jr.; Howard, a railroad machinist of Dells- 
worth, Minnesota ; Addie, a stenographer living at Erie, Pennsylvania ; 
Bertha, who is a well-known actress ; and Chester, a practicing chemist. 
Mr. Humphryes is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Presby- 
terian Church, and his political belief is that of the republican party. He 
is an ardent sportsman, and frequently takes hunting and fishing trips, 
seldom returning without some worthy trophy of field or stream. Since 
returning to Ironton, in 1914, he has renewed acquaintances and re- 
established friendships, and is contimiing to show an interest in the 
growth and development of the region to which lie first came so many 
years ago. 

John i\I. Chick. Of the merchants who liave assisted in sustaining 
the Imsiness integrity of Ironton, more than passing mention is due 
John ]\I. Urick, a member of an old and well-known family of the Hang- 
ing Rock Region, who for fifteen years has l)een the proprietor of a 
grocery store here. This business has enjoyed a consistent and pleasing 
growth, and reflects the untiring zeal, energy and perseverance of the 
man who, from a small beginning, has advanced its fortunes to the promi- 
nence of a necessary eonunercial adjunct. 



IIAXGL\G KOCK IKOX KEGIOX 745 

Mr. Urick was born at Irontoii, LawreiR-e County, Ohio, xVpril 25, 
1865, and is a son of James B. and Hannah (Goddard) Uriek. His father 
was born in Botetourt County, Virginia, in 1823, and was brought to 
Lawrence County when a niere lad, here growing uj) amid agricultural 
surroundings and early adopting the vocations of gardener and farmer, 
in which he continued to be engaged throughout his active years. An 
industrious and hard-working man, he rounded out a long and useful life 
in 1888, when he passed away at the age of sixty-five yeax's. Hannah 
(Goddard) l^rick was born in Pennsylvania in 1827, came to Ohio in 
girlhood, and here died May 11, 1911. She was the mother of ten chil- 
dren, as follows: Thomas C, J^mily P\, Lydia, James A., Rosie, Mary, 
Luella, Sarah. John M., AVilliam and Lily, of whom Lydia, James A. and 
John M. are the survivors. 

John M. L'rick received only ordinary educational advantages in his 
youth, for when he was a student in the Seventh Grade he laid aside 
his books to assist his father in his gardening operations. Following this 
he was employed in a brick yard for three years, and then received his 
introduction to the grocery business as driver of the delivery wagon for 
W. H. Lynd, an Ironton grocer. After six months, his industry and 
faithfulness won him promotion to the position of inside clerk, in which 
capacity he was employed for fifteen years, during which time he 
familiarized himself thoroixghly with every detail of the business. Mr. 
Urick entered tlie business field on his own account June 19, 1899, when 
he opened an establishment at Seventh and Monroe streets, a property 
which he still owns and in which he has continued to carry on a large 
and constantly-increasing business. He has added frequently to his stock 
and by his diligent attention to the re(iuirements of the public, his careful 
and intelligent Inlying, his courteous treatment of customers and his 
prompt and honest dealings, he has established a trade which is not sur- 
passed, either in (juantity or quality, by any similar patronage in Iron- 
ton. Mr. I'l'ick is the owner of his own residence at No. 205 South Seventh 
Street anil several other residence properties, and is a director of the 
Star l^uilding and Loan Association. As a side line he raises White 
Legliorn chickens, jioultry of a superior quality, and at this time has a 
flock of a1)out oOO hens. Mrs. Urick, who is also possessed of good busi- 
ness ability, raises dahlias for the market and receives a goodly return 
for lier labors. They are members of Emanuel Methodist Church. Mr. 
Urick -is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Connnerce and has shown 
liis interest in educational affairs by serving three years as a member of 
the school ])0>ird. He is a republican in his political views, and his 
fraternal connection is witli the Kniglits of Pythias. 

Mr. Urick was married January 6, 1896, to ^liss Emma Nance, 



746 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

daughter of William Nance, a retired farmer of Lawrence Comity. 
Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Urick, namely : Hannah, 
Rachel, Mathilda, Carrie, Frank, Nellie, Margaret and Paul. 

Fred AV. Geiger. Twice retained as receiver for the Ebert Brewing 
Company of Ironton, Lawrence County, Mr. Geiger, who is the incumbent 
of this responsible position at the present time, has shown much dis- 
crimination and executive ability in handling the affairs of this business, 
through his connection with which and other important interests in 
Ironton he has become well known as one of the representative young 
business men of his native city. 

Mr. Geiger was born at Ironton on the 12th of April, 1886, and is a 
son of Henry J. and Fannie (Ebert) Geiger, both natives of Klingenburg, 
Germany, where the former was born in 1850 and the latter in 1853. The 
father was reared and educated in his native land, where he learned the 
brewer's trade with all of the thoroughness common to the industry in 
Germany. In 1869 he immigrated to the United States and after remain- 
ing about three months in New York City he came to Ohio and established 
his residence in Ironton, where he was long and prominently identified 
with the brewing business and where he has lived virtually a retired life 
since 1905. He and his wife are well known and popular representatives 
of the German element of citizenship in Lawrence County and they are 
the parents of seven children, namely: Leo N., Mathilde B., Henry J., 
Jr., Fred W., Otto A., Charles T. and Bertha E. 

Fred W. Geiger is indebted to the public schools of Ironton for his 
early educational discipline and after his graduation in the high school, 
as a member of the class of 1904, he completed a course in the Davidson 
Business College, in which he was graduated in 1905. Accepting a cleri- 
cal position in the Iron City Savings Bank, he won advancement through 
effective service, having held the position of bookkeeper until his promo- 
tion to that of teller. Of the latter post he continued to be a valued 
incumbent until 1908,. when he resigned his position to accept that of 
receiver of the Ebert Brewing Company. He served in this capacity 
until 1911 and brought the business of the concern into excellent condi- 
tion. After his retirement he w^as engaged in the flour and feed business 
until 1913, when he was again appointed receiver of the Ebert Brewing 
Company, to the affairs of which he has since continued to give the major 
part of his time and attention, with the result that he is again bringing 
the enterprise into effective order, with much discrimination in the admin- 
istration of the large financial interests involved. 

Mr. Geiger is one of the popular young men in the business and social 
circles of his native city and is the owner of the attractive home at 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 747 

198 South Fifth Street, the same being made a center of gracious hospi- 
tality with his popular wife as its chatelaine. Mr. Geiger was first 
sergeant of the Ironton High School Cadets during three years of his 
student life; he is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is 
affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and both he and his wife are communicants of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church. 

On the 2Sth of November, 1911, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Geiger to Miss Minnie Fuller, daughter of Van Fuller, a representative 
citizen of Ii"onton, and the one child of this union is Helen Louise. 

W. Wilson Lynd, M. D. One of the representative physicians and 
surgeons of the younger generation in his native city and county, Doctor 
Lynd is established in the successful general practice of his profession 
at Ironton, the judicial center and metropolis of Lawrence County, with 
office and residence at 306 South Sixth Street. In the surgical branch 
of his profession he has performed numerous minor operations and 
assisted in delicate major operations, but he has not found it expedient to 
specialize in any phase of practice, as his services have been in requisition 
along general lines and his success has been such as to indicate popular 
appreciation of his ability and of his devotion to his exacting and 
humane vocation. 

Doctor Lynd was born at Ironton on the 25th of January, 1879, and 
is a son of William H. and Nalona L. (Uriek) Lynd, both representa- 
tives of honored pioneer families of Lawrence County, where the father 
was born, at Burlington, on the 3d of November, 1852, the mother having 
been born at Ironton in 1854 and having here been called to the life 
eternal when but thirty years of age, her death having occurred in 1884. 
William H. Lynd later wedded Miss Flora Cumpston and they have five 
children — Georgia, Benjamin, Grace, Howard and Edith. Of the four 
children of the first marriage one died in infancy and those surviving 
are James C, Josephine, and Dr. W. Wilson Lynd, of this review. 
William H. Lynd is a well known citizen and business man of Ironton, 
where he is engaged in the retail grocery business. 

In the public schools of Ironton Doctor Lynd continued his studies 
until his graduation in the high school, in 1899, and in preparing him- 
self for the work of his chosen profession he was signally favored in 
having the advantages of that excellent institution, Miami Medical Col- 
lege, in the City of Cincinnati. He was there graduated as a member of 
the class of 1903, with the degree of Doctor of Medicine, and he soon 
afterward established himself in practice at Ironton, where he continued 
his labors until a nervous breakdown rendered it expedient for him to 



748 IIAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

lessen his strenuous application and seek more or less radical change, 
in 1908. lie passed about six months in the City of Hanford, Cali- 
fornia, and thereafter remained about three months in New Mexico, 
where he passed the required examination and qualified for practice, 
though his brief sojourn in that section of the Union did not permit him 
to engage in professional work save in an incidental way. Upon his 
return to Lawrence County, Ohio, the doctor engaged in practice at 
Houtli Point, where he built up a substantial business and remained 
three years. In April, 1912, he resumed practice in the Cit}' of Ironton, 
where he has since continued his successful efforts and controls an ex- 
cellent practice of representative order. He keeps in close touch with 
the advances made in medical and surgical science, by availing himself 
of the best of its standard and periodical literature and through his active 
affiliation with the Ohio State Medical Society and the Lawrence County 
]\Iedical Society. AVhile a resident of South Point he served as health 
officer of the village. 

Ill politics Dr. Lynd continues to pay unfaltering loyalty to the 
republican party ; botli he and his wife hold membership in Emanuel 
jMetliodist Episcopal Church; and he is affiliated with the Kniglits of 
I'ythias. the Knights of the Golden Eagle, the Junior Order of United 
American Meclianics, and the Daughters of America, besides which he 
is identified with the Ironton Cliamber of Commerce and is an earnest 
siij)porter of its higli civic and commercial ideals and policies. 

On the 4tli of June. P)02, Dr. Lynd wedded .Miss Clara Weist, 
(hiugliter of Henry Weist, a prominent contractor and builder in the 
City of Cincinnati, and tlie two children oE tliis union are Lester 0., 
and W. Wilson, Jr. 

Joseph C. \Vei!i:i!. One of tlie thriving enterprises of Ironton which 
occiqiies a firmly-estalilislied i)lace in the commercial world is AVeber 
brothers' Greenhouse, located at No. 'Ml South Sixth Stivet. This 
business is chai'actei-istie of the energy, progress and good management 
which have contributed to Ironton "s i)restige. and its managers, Joseph 
C. and Frank ]M. AVel)er. are justly accounted leaders among the younger 
generation of l)usiness men here. They are sons of Joseph and Mary 
( Diiker) AVelii-r. tlie former of whom was l)orn in Germany in 1846 and 
laiiie to tile I'nited Stales in young manhood, settling at Ilecla Furnace, 
Lawrence County, Ohio. For many years I\Ir. AVeber was engaged in 
-blacksmithing, and was known as an indiislrious and energetic business 
man, but is now retiretl from aetivi' life and lives (juietly at his home at 
Ironton. Tile motliei', who also survives, was born in Lawrence County, 
(^hio, in 18r)4. Tliere were twtdvi' cliihlreii in the famih'. as follows: 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 749 

Fred W., Joseph C, Frank M., IMary, John F., Albert M., Rosa, Philip 
AV., Henry, Leonard, Liz/.ie and Clara. Of these, ^lary, Rosa and 
Lizzie are deceased. 

Joseph C. AVeber was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, July 14, 1878, 
and until reaching the age of seventeen years attended the public school 
at Kelly's ]\Iills. At that time he began working on a farm, where he 
developed a love for flowers and plants as well as decided skill in their 
culture. When twenty-one years old he came to Ironton, where he re- 
ceived his initiation into the greenhouse business as an employe of Mrs. 
E. Miller, who had an established business. Seven years later, in part- 
nership with his brother, Frank M., Mr. Weber bought Mrs. Miller's 
interests, and since that time the business has been conducted as Weber 
Brothers' Greenhouse. The business has steadily grown in volume and 
scope, and at this time is valued at +11,000. The buildings are modern, 
and thoroughly equipped with up-to-date appurtenances, the brothers 
keeping fully abreast of the advancements which have been made in 
their line of activity. Joseph C. Weber is a director in the Ironton 
Athletic and xinmsement Company, and is greatly interested in athletics 
and out-of-door sports, particularly hunting and baseball. He takes an 
interest in the business growth of the city, and has contributed thereto 
as a member of the Chamber of Commerce. A consistent member of St. 
Joseph's Catholic Church, he has served as trustee thereof for the past 
ten years, and is also an active member of the Knights of Columbus and 
St. George's Society. Politically, he is a democrat, but has only taken 
a good citizen 's part in pulilic matters. Mr. Weber is unmarried. 

Frank M. AVeber was born in 1880, in Lawrence County, Ohio, and, 
like his brother, attended the schools of Kelly's Mills until seventeen 
years of age. He also began his career on a farm, on which he remained 
for five years, following which he spent two years in the iron works. 
He then joined his brother in the florist business, to which he has since 
devoted all of his energies. jNIr. AVeber is a member of St. Joseph's 
Catholic Church and of St. George's Society. He is a democrat, but his 
l)usiness duties have precluded any idea of his actively entering politics 
as a seeker for personal preferment. 

On October 27, 1908, Mr. Weber was united in marriage with Miss 
Clara :M. Ball, daughter of Martin Ball, of Ironton. 

Samuel A. Bowmax. That in considering the status of Mr. Bowman 
as a representative citizen and valued official of Lawrence County there 
can be no application of the scriptural aphorism that "a prophet is not 
without honor save in his own country," is evident when it is stated 
that he is a native of this county, a scion of one of its sterling pioneer 



750 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

families, and is at the present time serving in the office of county 
auditor. 

]\Ir. Bowman was born at Southpoint, on Little Solida Creek, Law- 
rence County, Ohio, on the 16th of November, 1876, and the same place 
figures as the native heath of his father, Thisle M. Bowman, who was 
there born on ithe 2d of April, 1842, his parents having been numbered 
among the early settlers of Lawrence County and his father having 
contributed w'orthily to the social and industrial development of this 
section of the Buckeye State. Thisle M. Bowman became one of the 
substantial and representative agriculturists of his. native county, and 
he also follows the trade of cooper for some time. He was a man of 
distinctive business ability and of sterling character, so that he ever com- 
manded secure place in popular confidence and esteem, as shown by the 
fact that he was called upon to serve as deputy county auditor and also 
as deputy sheriff. His death occurred in 1904, and his loved and devoted 
wife, whose maiden name was Lucy Pemberton, and who was bom at 
Southpoint, Lawrence County, in 1845, was summoned to eternal rest 
in 1902. The names of their nine children are here entered in respective 
order of birth : Ames N., Charles W., Dora C, Samuel A., Lucy F., 
Emma L., Roscoe H., Thisie M., Jr., and Shirley 0. 

The present county auditor of Lawrence County attended the pub- 
lic schools of his native place until he had attained to the age of eighteen 
years, and he then put his scholastic acquirements to practical test 
and utilization by entering the pedagogic profession, of which he became 
an able and popular representative as a teacher in the schools of this sec- 
tion of the state. He continued his effective services as a teacher until 
he had attained to the age of twenty-seven years, and thereafter, from 
1904 to 1910, he had charge of the rural free mail delivery on Route 
No. 2, from Ironton. He resigned this incumbency when he became a 
candidate for the office of county auditor, to which he was elected in 
1910, by a majority that emphatically attested his hold upon the con- 
fidence and good will of the people of his native county. He assumed 
his official duties October 16, 1911, and his administration has been 
marked by scrupulous care and circumspection, so that he has fully 
justified the popular choice which placed him in office, the while he is 
one of the popular and progressive citizens of Ironton, the judicial center 
and metropolis of Lawrence County. 

In politics Mr. Bowman is a stalwart advocate of the principles and 
policies of the republican party; his religious faith is that of the Bap- 
tist church; and he is affiliated with the local organizations of the 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Knights of the Golden Eagle, and the Loyal Order of Moose. Though 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 751 

he is a baehelox*, Mr. Bowinau is the owner of a residence property and 
two additional city lots in Irontou, and he is also a director of the 
South Side Building & Loan Association of this city. He is a man of 
high ideals and utmost rectitude, and is justly proud of the fact that 
he has never touched intoxicating liquor' in any form. He has greatly 
enjoyed his experience as a teacher and his success in the profession has 
been on a parity with his recognized zeal and enthusiasm. Mr. Bowman 
greatly enjoys all outdoor sports, and through the medium of the same 
finds his chief recreation, the while he is distinctively popular in both 
business and social circles in his home city. 

Samuel Brewster. In choosing the men who are to act as his 
advisers and members of the municipal cabinet, the chief executive of 
any live and progressive community is wise who brings about him only 
strong, reliable and practical men, possessed of industry, faithfulness, 
honesty and experience. Mayor Hannan, of Ironton, made no mistake 
when, in 1914, he appointed Sam Brewster to the position of service 
director of the city, a place for which he was eminently fitted owing to 
his long and varied business experience, his organizing ability and his 
executive power. He has been in office only for a comparatively short 
period, yet has already vindicated the faith placed in him and is ren- 
dering his fellow-citizens excellent services. 

Mr. Brewster was born in Lawrence county, Ohio, March 31, 1869, 
and is a son of James and Rebecca (Millard) Brewster. His father, a 
West Virginian, was born in 1819, married in his native state, and came 
to Lawrence County, Ohio, about 1865, here continuing to be engaged in 
agricultui-al pursuits up to the time of his death, in 1877. His widow, 
also born in West Virginia, in 1842, never remarried, but remained 
single until her death in 1908. They were the parents of seven children, 
as follows: Margaret, James J., Samuel, William, John W., Charles H. 
and Rebecca, of whom William died in infancy. Sam Brewster was 
reared on his father's farm in Lawrence until he was eight years of age 
and then came to Ironton and entered the public schools, which he 
attended until reaching the age of fifteen years. At that time he com- 
menced to learn the trade of carpenter, which he followed for fifteen 
years as a journeyman, and in 1902 became a member of the Ironton 
police force, with which he was connected until 1906. At that time he 
took up contracting and building on his owt^i account, and continued to 
be so engaged very successfully until 1913, building up a large and 
representative business in Ironton and the surrounding vicinity. In 1913 
Mr. Brewster was made safety director, under Mayor T. J. Kennedy 
and continued to hold that o^ce for five months, being then appointed 



752 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

service director under Mayor A. J. Haniian, January 6, 1914. His enter- 
prise, tempered with conservatism, and his absohite integrity in civic 
affairs, have gained him an excellent record in public life, and as a busi- 
ness man he has also achieved an enviable reputation. He was one of 
the organizers of the Home Building dnd Loan Association, of Ironton, 
and is still a stockholder and director thereof. About twenty years ago 
Mr. Brewster assisted in the organization of the Ironton local of the 
Carpenters' Union, and he still continues as a member thereof. Fra- 
ternally, he is connected with the Junior Order United American 
3Iechanics a]id the ^Modern AYoodmen of America. He is particularly 
fond of all out-door sports and is an enthusiastic baseball fan. Politically, 
Mr. l^rewster is affiliated with the republican party. 

On December 17, 1902, Mr. Brewster was married to Miss Jennie 
("Jrindshaw, of Ironton. daughter of John E. Grindshaw. They have no 
children. 

AV]LLiAM H. Neal. An able and honored member of the judiciary of 
Lawrence County, ^Ir. Neal is one of the representative citizens of 
Ironton, the county seat, and here he is giving a most effective adminis- 
tration as justice of the peace, his services being such as to make the 
office justify its name. 

]\Ir. Neal was born at Keystone Furnace, Jackson County, Ohio, on 
the 31st of May, 1856, and is a son of Levi and Nancy (Hunt) Neal, the 
former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the latter of whom was 
born in Lawrence County, Ohio, in 18.35, a date that indicates that she is 
a representative of a pioneer family of this section of the Buckeye 
State, her home being now in Elizabeth Township, this county, where 
she is held in affectionate regard by all who know her. Levi Neal 
promptly manifested his patriotism when the Civil war was precipitated 
on a divided nation. In response to the first call for volunteers he 
enlisted in an Ohio Regiment, and he sacrificed his life in the cause of 
the Union, as he was killed on the field of battle, in 1862, when about 
twenty-seven years of age. His widow subsequently became the wife 
of Philip S. Justin, whose death occurred in 1914, he having been a pros- 
perous farmer of Lawrence County. Of the nine children of the first 
inarriage AVilliam H., of this review is the only survivor, and by his 
mother's second marriage she became the parent of five children, of 
whom four are living — Frank, Philip, Daniel and Charles. 

William II. Neal attended the public schools of Lawrence 'County 
until he had attained the age of eighteen years, and he thereafter became 
a workman in the iron mines of the county. While thus employed he was 
injured by a caving in of the section of mine in which he was working, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 753 

and the result of the injury was that it became necessary to amputate 
his right leg at a point below the knee. This injury incapacitated him 
for further manual labor of the more strenuous order, and after attend- 
ing school for another year he proved himself eligible for pedagogic 
honors. For the long period of sixteen years he was numbered among 
the successful and popular teachers in the public schools of Lawrence 
County, and this discipline, in connection with earnest study and read- 
ing, enabled him to round out a liberal education, the while he achieved 
marked prestige in his chosen profession, besides gaining secure vantage- 
ground in popular confidence and esteem. For nine years after his retire- 
ment from the pedagogic profession Mr. Neal was engaged as manager 
of the general merchandise store of Ilalley & Company at Pedro, Law- 
rence County, and he then removed to Ironton, the county seat, while 
he engaged in the insurance business. To this line of enterprise lie 
devoted his attention for three years, at the expiration of which, in 
1912, lie was elected justice of the peace, of which office he has since 
been tlie efficient incumbent. He has accurate knowledge of the basic 
principles of the science of jurisi:)rudence, and his judicial rulings have 
invariably l:)een marked l)y circumspection and mature judgment, so 
that he has wielded emphatic influence in the conserving of equity and 
justice. While a resident of Elizabeth Township Mr. Neal was called 
upon to serve in various local offices of public trust, including those of 
townsliip clerk, assessor, trustee and land appraiser, besides which he 
was for a number of years a member of the school board of his district. 
]Mr. Neal is a stanch advocate of the principles of the democratic party 
and both he and liis wife are zealous memljers of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

At Ironton, on the 11th of September, 1882, was solemnized the mar- 
liage of ^Ir. Neal to Miss Lyda Grant, daughter of the late Stephen 
Grant, of Pedro, this county. Concerning the eight children of Mr. and 
]\Irs. Neal the following brief record is given : Otis, who is station agent 
for the Chesapeake & Ohio Railroad at Russell, Greenup County, Ken- 
tucky, married Miss Ethel Taylor, and they have two children — William 
A. and Estherlin ;' Harry and Jessie are not married and both reside in 
Lawrence County ; Ray, who occupies a responsible clerical position with 
a representative firm at Norwood, Ohio, married Miss IMabel Fowler ; Inez 
died in childhood, as did also Clara and Clarence, who were twins; and 
Nora remains at the parental home. 

Dennis II. Clarke. It becomes the fortune of but few men to attain 
the success that has rewarded the efforts of Dennis H. Clarke before 
reaching their fortietli year and to gain it through individual endeavor 



754 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

and without the assistance of financial support or the influence of those 
already established in life. Still in the prime of manhood, with his best 
years before him, Mr. Clarke has attained a position that many men would 
deem sufficient at the end of a lifetime of honest endeavor, and as half- 
owner of the properties of the Model Laundry he must be accounted one 
of the influential factors in the business life of the Hanging Rock Region. 

Mr. Clarke is a native son of Ironton, Lawrence County, born June 
27, 1875, his parents being Columbus and Sadie (Kouus) Clarke. His 
father, a native of Millersport, Ohio, was born in 1853 and for a number 
of years was engaged in the grocery business at Ironton, where he died 
February 17, 1914. Mrs. Clarke, who was born at Burlington, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, in 1856, died in 1904, leaving only one child, Dennis H., 
and the father contracted a second marriage with Mrs. Ella Guerin, 
who stiU survives and makes her home at Logan, this state. Dennis H. 
Clarke was given good educational advantages in his youth, attending 
the public and high schools of Ironton and then spending three years at 
Cornell University, which institution he left in 1896 to accept the posi- 
tion of bookkeeper in the Bank of Steele, North Dakota. He spent only 
one year in this capacity, however, then returning to Ironton, where 
from 1898 until 1905 he was superintendent of the water works and 
during this time established himself firmly in the public confidence. 
In the latter year he invested his savings in a one-half interest in the 
Model Steam Laundry Company, and with this concern has been con- 
nected to the present time. Associated with him is ]\Ir. A. C. Shubert, 
who has charge of the company's other establishment at ^Yilliamson, 
West Virginia, which is operated under the same name. The name of 
this business is no misnomer, for it is model in every respect. The 
buildings have been arranged with the idea of securing the greatest 
sanitarj' conditions, the machinery is of the latest manufacture known 
to the trade, and ever}^ detail of the business has been worked out along 
the most up-to-date lines. INIr. Clarke is progressive by nature, and is 
known as a hustler and a business-getter, as well as a man of high busi- 
ness principles and of fidelity in the meeting of engagements. He has 
steadfastly "boosted" the interests of his city, and is an active and 
Avorking member of the Chamber of Commerce. Politically a republican, 
his only office has been that of superintendent of the water works, l)ut he 
has always taken an interest in politics as they have affected Ironton and 
its people. His fraternal connections include membership in the ^Masons, 
the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. With his family 
he attends the Episcopal Church. 

On October 5. 1904, Mr. Clarke was married to ]\liss ^linnie B. 
Massie, daughter of Ephraim I\lassie. now deceased, who was formerly 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 755 

a well-known hotelkeeper of Ironton. One child has been born to this 
union: Dennis H., Ji\ Mr. and Mrs. Clarke reside in their own com- 
fortable home at Ironton. 

Louis A. FiLLGROVE. An old and substantial business in Ironton has 
been conducted by Louis A. Fillgrove for nearly forty years. A tinner 
and roofer, he has made a reputation of performing skillfully and effi- 
ciently all contracts entrusted to his charge, and on this reputation has 
been based his standing as a business man and citizen. 

Born in Pensylvania January 2, 1856, he is a son of George and 
Henrietta (Reuper) Fillgrove, both of whom were natives of Hanover, 
Germany. His father was born in 1822 and his mother in 1821. Coming 
to America and settling in Pennsylvania in 1854, the father lived there 
a few years, and in 1861 transferred his residence to Lawrence County, 
Ohio, and quietly followed his vocation there until his death in 1890. 
The mother died in 1907. Their five children were : Minnie, deceased ; 
William M. ; August ; Louis A. ; and Charles, deceased. 

Louis A. Fillgrove was educated in the public schools of Ironton until 
seventeen and thereafter went to work to learn a trade and make his 
own way. After an apprenticeship in the tinner's trade, he worked as a 
journeyman until 1876, and then opened a shop at Ironton, and has con- 
ducted it with increasing success ever since. In the meantime his busi- 
ness influence and possessions have increased, and beside the work which 
constitutes his principal calling he is a stockholder in the First National 
Bank and in the Home Telephone Company, owns two double residences, 
five vacant lots and also a business block on North 2nd Street. 

On May 11, 1879, at Ironton, Mr. Fillgrove married Sophia Horn, 
daughter of Henry and Dorothea (Miller) Horn. Her father was one of 
the early butchers of Ironton. To their union have been born seven chil- 
dren: Henry C. ; Clara D.; Edward C. ; Howard, deceased; Bertha; 
Edith ; and one that died in infancy. The son Henry, who is employed 
by his father in the tinning and roofing business, married Rosia Wolff, 
and their four children are : ]\Iildred ; Dorothea, deceased ; and Lester 
and Chester, twins. Clara is the wife of Charles Bester of Ironton, and 
their two children are Louis and Karl. The son Edward is unmarried 
and is also a tinner by trade. Bertha and Edith are students in the Iron- 
ton high school. Mr. Fillgrove is a republican in politics, a member of 
the Lutheran Church, and a member of the Chamber of Commerce. 

Thomas W. Price. The reputation of a community rests almost 
entirely upon the character" of its business men, their integrity, enter- 
prise, vim and fidelity to contracts and engagements being, in most in- 



756 HANGING ROCK IR(3N REGION 

stances, a gauge by which the prosperity of the town or city may be 
measured. Ironton has been especially fortunate in the character and 
abilities of its business men, and among them none is held in higher 
general esteem than Thomas AV. Price, secretary and treasurer of the 
Ironton Roofing and Corrugating Company, and a man who has gained 
success through the medium of his own well-directed efforts. Mr. Price 
was born at Ironton, Lawrence County, Ohio, January 15, 1861, and is 
a son of AV. L. and ^Mathilda J. (Goodder) Price. 

Born at Ellenale, AA'ales, in 1830, AV. L. Price emigrated to the United 
States in 1848, and not long thereafter came to the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region and for a number of years was employed in the rolling mills of 
Ironton. His death occurred in 1869. Mrs. Price, who was born in 
Gallia County, Ohio, in 1831, still survives in hale and hearty old age 
and makes her home at Ironton. Four children were born to Mr. and 
Mrs. Price : Frank AA^., Thomas AV., Martha J. and Harriet G. After 
attending the public graded and high schools until reaching the age of 
fifteen years, Thomas W. Price began work in the nail department of the 
rolling mills at Ironton, and there continued for fifteen years, winning 
steady promotion through the exercise of fidelity and industry. In the 
meantime he carefully invested his savings, with the end in view of 
entering business on his own account, and in 1897 his ambition was real- 
ized when he purchased an interest in the Ironton Roofing and Corrugat- 
ing Company, of which he was made secretary and treasurer, positions 
which he has continued to retain to the present time. The company has 
enjoyed a business that is steadily growing to larger proportions, and the 
plant at this time is valued at $5,000, being fitted with the latest ma- 
chinery and appurtenances. Among his associates Mr. Price is known 
as a man of excellent business judgment, foresight and acumen, and the 
utmost confidence is placed in him. Although the greater part of his at- 
tention is given to this business, he also has other interests, and is a 
stockholder in the Home Telephone Company, and the owner of ten 
residences in Ironton, including his own pleasant home, at No. 162 
North Fifth Sti'eet. He is a prominent Alason, having advanced to the 
Shriner degree, and belongs to the Modern AVoodmen of America, and 
in both fraternities has many warm friends. He takes much inter- 
est in religious work, being a vestryman and secretary of the Episcopal 
Church at Ironton, and has also been active in educational matters as a 
meml)er of the Board of Education. He is a republican of the old type 
and a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Price was married April 30, 1886, at the home of the bride at 
Ironton, to Miss Rachel Davies, daughter of Thomas J. and Elizabeth 
(Thomas) Davies, and to this union there have been born two children: 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 757 

Anna, who married Willnir Jones and died in 1011, leaving one son, 
Ralph ; Frank AV., assistant foreman in the Ironton Roofing and Corru- 
gating Company, who married Elizabeth Boll. 

John II. AIcGee. Tliere is special consistency in the vocation fol- 
lowed by this venerable and honored citizen of Ironton, for as a pension 
attorney he has achieved a worthy Avork in behalf of his old comrades of 
the Civil war, his having been the disti)]ction of serving through virtually 
the entire course of the great contliet through wdiich the integrity of the 
nation was perpetuated and his loyalty in the times of peace having been 
of the same intense order, begotten, as it is, of high ideals and impreg- 
nable integrity of character. ]\Ir. McGee has been a resident of Lawrence 
County for more than half a century, is the oldest notary public in the 
county and here he has a circle of friends w-hose number is limited only 
by that of his accjuaintances. Well it is that this publication should pay 
a special trilmte to this honored pioneer citizen of the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region of Ohio. 

Mr. McGee was born in Russell County, Virginia, on the 2od of April, 
1840, and is a son of Benjamin F. and Nancy (May) AIcGee, both natives 
of Virginia and representatives of sterling old families of that historic 
commonwealth. The father, who was a farmer or planter by vocation, 
died in 1.S47, when the subject of this review was a lad of seven years, 
and well did the devoted mother meet the responsibilities and burdens 
that devolved upon her in the care of her four children, of whom John H. 
is the only son and the eldest of the number, the liames of his sisters, in 
order of birth, being as follows: Elizabetli, Cynthia, and ^lary. The 
mother was born in Russell County, Virginia, on the 13th of September, 
1821, and was summoned to the life eternal in 1892, in Kentucky. Slie 
eventually contracted a second marriage, by Ix'coming tlie wife of Hardin 
Hurle}', who likewise is deceased. 

Mr. McGee was afforded the advantages of the schools of liis native 
county, his mother having been a skilled weaver and having defrayed by 
her work as si;ch the expenses of educating her children. Slie finally re- 
moved with her family to Kentucky, and in the Village of Pikeville, Pike 
County, that state, John H. AFcGee continued his studies in the public 
schools. In July, 1858, when seventeen years of age, he came to Lawrence 
Cou)ity, Ohio, and established his residence in Ironton. He found em- 
ployment in the Hecla Furnace, in th(^ mines and at such other work as 
was available, until the inception of tlic Civil wai', when he promptly put 
aside all ])ersonal considerations and interests to tender liis aid in defense 
of the Union. Oii the 9th day of July, 1861. in response to the first call 
for vohnite<M's for the th.rec months' service. lie enlisted in the first inde- 



758 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

pendent cavalry company organized in this section of the State, Com- 
pany A of the First Ohio Cavalry, and with this command he served until 
the expiration of his term of enlistment. He then re-enlisted, as a mem- 
ber of Battery L, First Ohio Light Artillery, on the 2d of October, 1861, 
and he received his honorable discharge on the 1st of January, 186-4. He 
received his discharge at Warrenton Junction, Virginia, after having par- 
ticipated in numerous engagements on the soil of his native State, but 
his patriotic ardor was not in the least diminished, as shown by the fact 
that he at once re-enlisted, as a veteran, in the same battery, with which 
he continued in active service until the close of the war, his having been 
the misfortune to encounter the irony of fate and to lose his right foot in 
the last battle in which his command was involved. This wound was in- 
flicted by the last shot fired in the battle of Cedar Creek, on the 19th of 
October, 1864, and the ball which caused the loss of the right foot of IMr. 
McGee took also the left foot of one of his comrades, a man named Jones, 
besides wounding five other members of Battery L. The service of IMr. 
McGee covered a total of three years, eleven months and eight days, and 
among the more important engagements in which he took part may be 
noted the following: Port Republic, Chantilly, Second Battle of Bull 
Run, Antietam, Winchester, Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, Gettys- 
burg, Mine Run, Fort Stevens, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek, in which 
last mentioned battle he received the wound that destroyed his foot. He 
was with his battery on marches covering a total distance of 3,500 miles, 
and his record as a soldier was in every sense a model of valor, fidelity and 
earnest devotion. He never indulged in spirituous liquors of any kind, 
never took part in any riotous actions such as were at times in evidence in 
the ranks of the contending forces, never gambled and never was on the 
sick list until he required the services of the surgeon in the last battle of 
his splendid military career. He and his comrade, Jones, lay on the field 
of battle at Cedar Creek during an entire night and suffered intensely 
from cold, while their wounds caused them nearly to bleed to death before 
they were rescued and given necessary care. Mr. McGee was in the hos- 
pital from the 21st of Octo])er until June, 1865, when he was discharged 
at Cincinnati. 

After the close of the war ]\Ir. ]McGee returned to Ironton, where he 
was engaged in the retail grocery business for the ensuing five years. He 
then removed to Rock Camp, likewise in Lawrence County, and there he 
conducted a general store from 1870 until 1892. He was one of the lead- 
ing business men and influential citizens of the town, where he served 
eighteen years as postmaster and where he held impregnable place in the 
confidence and esteem of the entire community. In the year last men- 
tioned Mr. jMcGee returned to Ironton, where he was engaged in the dry- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 759 

goods business for one year, since which time his activities have been 
principally in his effective service as a pension attorney and his official 
service as notary public, a position of which he is the oldest incumbent in 
the county, besides having held the post for a longer period than any 
other notary in the county, his original appointment having been made in 
1874. 

It may readily be inferred that Mr. McGee has retained a deep 
interest in his old comrades in arms and that he is an appreciative and 
valued member of that noble organization, the Grand Army of the Re- 
public, in which his affiliation is with Dick Lambert Post, No. 165, at 
Ironton. He is a republican in his political allegiance, served six years 
as a director of the county infirmary, and both he and his wife are zealous 
members of the Pine Street Methodist Episcopal Church. The Christian 
faith of Mr. McGee has been signally exemplified in his daily life, and he 
is kindly, tolerant and charitable in his judgment of others, so that in the 
gracious evening of his well spent life he finds himself surrounded with 
troops of friends and with those comforts and associations that should 
ever reward earnest and honorable living. In addition to his membership 
in the Grand Army of the Republic he is affiliated with the Royal 
Arcanum. 

On the 21st of January, 1864, Mr. McGee wedded Miss Mary A. Holli- 
day, while in Lawrence County on a furlough. The devoted wife and 
mother was called to the life eternal on the 7tli of July, 1912, and her 
memory is revered by all who came within the circle of her gracious infi.u- 
ence. Of the five children the eldest is Miss Sadie, who now resides in the 
City of Chicago ; Martha J. is the wife of Charles G. Bazell, engaged in 
the lumber business in the State of Tennessee ; Mamie died in childhood ; 
31aggie is the wife of Isaac H. Booth, a teacher in the State Normal at 
Richmond, Kentucky, and Addie is the wife of Frank Bazell, a farmer 
and carpenter, residing at Rock Camp, Lawrence County, Ohio. 

On the 12th of December, 1912, Mr. McGee married Mrs. Sarah A. 
Kemp, widow of James H. Kemp, and she presides most graciously over 
their pleasant home. In 1913, fifty years after he liad fought on its liattle- 
field, Mr. ]\IcGee visited Gettysburg. 

Dan C. Jones. The many opportunities presented to the lawyer for 
varied service has been well utilized by Dan C. Jones, who is in the front 
rank of Lawrence County lawyei's, and has a high standing and many 
associations with the business, social and civic life of his home city. 

Mr. Jones was born December 18, 1878, at Oak Hill in Jackson 
County, Ohio. His father, the late Evan C. Jones, who was also born at 
Oak Hill in Jackson County in 1841 was for a numl)er of years county 



760 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

surveyor and an expert mining engineer, whose death occurred Septem- 
ber 15, 1910. Two of Dan C. Jones' uncles, John C. Jones and David C. 
Jones were the pioneer operators in the Jackson County coal field, and 
John C. Jones was secretary of the Tropic Furnace Company at Jackson, 
Ohio, for many years. The mother's maiden name was ^Margaret Parry, 
who was born at Oak Hill in Jackson County in 1852 and died in 1912. 
They were the parents of five children: Dan C, Susie, Elizabeth, Mar- 
garet and Edna. 

Dan C. Jones began training for practical life in the common schools 
and in the high school at Jackson, graduated with the degree Ph. B. at 
the Ohio State University in 1902 and continued his course through the 
law department until finishing with the degree LL. B. in 1905. During 
his college career he was a memlier of the Greek letter fraternities Sigma 
Alpha Epsilon and the Phi Delta Phi, and also belonged to the Scholar- 
ship Honor Society, Phi Beta Kappa. Mr. Jones began active practice 
of law at Ironton in 1905 with Johnson and Corn, and afterwards 
became the junior partner in the law firm of Johnson and Jones, and 
soon acciuired a profitable practice. IMuch of his work is performed as 
representative of a number of important business and industrial con- 
cerns in the Hanging Rock Iron Region. 

Mr. Jones was married June 17, 1908, to ^Marguerite Blanche Jones, 
who has brought to the management of her home and her social rela- 
tions a thorough training and culture acquired in Oberlin College, 
from which she graduated A. B. and also at the Boston Conservatory 
of Music and later studied in Europe. Iler father is Ezekial Jones, a 
large coal operator in Jackson County. 

Mr. Jones is a republican in politics, is affiliated with the Masons, 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks, and also with the Century Club, and his church is the Presbyterian. 
]\Ir. Jones is a student, both in his profession and of affairs and litera- 
ture, and is one of the live men who are forwarding tlic eoimmuiity wel- 
fare of Ironton along progressive and substantial lines. 

Albert J. Frecka. With a well equipped establishment at 28 South 
Third Street, in the City of Ironton, ilr. Frecka conducts a prosperous 
plumbing business, and he is known as one of the popular and progress- 
ive business men of his native city, the metropolis and judicial center of 
Lawrence County, where he was born on the 15th of June, 1883. 

Mr. Frecka is a son of Charles C. and ^Mary E. (AVitting) Frecka. tlie 
former of whom was born at Wheeling, AVe.st Virginia, in I860, and the 
latter of whom was born at Asliland. Kentucky, in 1862. The parents 
have been residents of Ironton since 1872. and liere the father was origin- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 761 

ally employed as an expert wire-maker in a leading manufacturing plant, 
but he now devotes his attention to the plumbing business. Of the ten 
children all are living except one, Henry. The names are here entered 
in the respective order of the children's birth : Albert J., John and Henry 
(twins), Karl, iMargaret, Marie, Anna, Ralph, Robert and Raymond. 

Albert J. Freeka continued to attend the public schools of Ironton 
until he had completed the first year's study in the high school, at the 
age of seventeen yeai's. About six years prior to this, when he was but 
eleven years old, he had initiated his virtual apprenticeship at the plumb- 
er 's trade, in which he eventually perfected his knowledge and became 
an expert artisan. He continued to work at plumbing at irregular inter- 
vals until he left the high school, and for two years thereafter he was 
employed in a nail and wire mill in Ironton, the ensuing three years hav- 
ing found him engaged as agent and wagon driver for the Model Laundry 
Company, with which he remained an additional three years in the capac- 
ity of shipping clerk. Upon severing this connection Mr. Freeka served 
two years as manager of the Fred Freeka Company's plumbing estab- 
lishment, and he then, in 1908, purchased the plant and business, which 
has since successfully conducted under his own name and in an individual 
way. 

Mr. Freeka has had no desire to withdraw from the loyal cohorts of 
the republican party, is actively identified with the Ironton Chamber of 
Commerce, and is an appreciative and popular member of the local lodge 
of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. 

On the 26th of February, 1908, Mr. Freeka wedded Miss Margaret 
Rist, daughter of John Rist, of Ironton, and they have three children, 
Lila E., Albert J., Jr., and John C. 

John C. Gorman, now serving as postmaster at Ironton, Ohio, under 
appointment from President Wilson, was born in Bulger, Pennsylvania, 
October 31, 1871. His parents moved to Steubenville, Ohio, when he was 
but two years old, and Mr. Gorman received his education in that city hav- 
ing attended the St. Peter's parochial school until the age of sixteen. His 
first practical business experience was in the moulder 's trade in which he 
served an apprenticeship and was a journeyman worker for seven yeai-s. 

Mr. Gorman came to Ironton in 1893 having accepted a position with 
the daily and semi-weekly Irontonian of which his brother, the late James 
I. Gorman, was owner and editor. Mr. Gorman was Married June 9, 1899, 
to Miss Mary A. Smith of Ironton, and they are the parents of four bright 
and interesting children: Joseph ]M., Mary A., Rosellen, and John, Jr. 
Mr. Gorman and family are members of St. Lawrence Catholic Church, 

Since coming to Ironton, Mr. Gorman has always taken an active 



762 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

interest in the city of his adoption, and an untiring worker in the ad- 
vancement of democratic principles. His appointment as postmaster of 
the City of Ironton is evidence of the confidence and good will of his 
fellowmen and also his worth as a good citizen. 

Edgar E. McKee, superintendent of the fitting department of the 
Excelsior Shoe Company, one of the principal industries of Ironton, is 
an excellent example of an individual finding his proper groove in life 
and then so directing his efforts as to make the most of his opportunities 
and to gain a full measure of success therefrom. Commencing his career 
as a teacher, after some years he turned his attention to the manufacture 
of shoes, and, commencing in the most humble capacity, thoroughly 
learned every detail of the business and worked his way steadily to a 
position of importance. 

Mr. McKee was born at South Point, Lawrence County, Ohio, Feb- 
ruary 12, 1872, and is a son of Barton G. and Cessie (Roberts) McKee, 
the former born at South Point in 1849 and the latter at Buffalo Creek, 
Lawrence County, in 1850. The father, who is still a resident of South 
Point, has been engaged in farming and fruit growing for many years, 
and has had a hand in directing educational matters as a member of the 
school board. There were twelve children in the family: Edgar E., of 
this notice ; Delbert, who died at the age of two years ; Ira B. ; OUie V. ; 
Howard C. ; Herbert ; Vessie ; Harland ; Harry B. ; Zella ; Lilla and Mason. 

Edgar E. McKee was given good educational advantages in the Law- 
rence County public schools, which he attended until eighteen years of 
age, and at that time adopted the vocation of educator. His career as a 
teacher included one year at Hampton City, Kentucky, one year at Olive 
Furnace, Ohio, one year at Hecla, Ohio, three years at Russell, Ken- 
tucky, one year at Alderson, West Virginia, one year at Laura, Kentucky, 
two years at Martinsville, Kentucky, and one year at Clarksdale, Missis- 
sippi, and at each of these places he won the confidence and friendship of 
those with whom he came in contact. With the understanding that should 
his abilities warrant it he was to be given the superintendency of a fac- 
tory, Mr. McKee took a position in the shoe shop at Portsmouth, Ohio, 
June 10, 1901, as a laborer at the block, and was steadily advanced from 
one position to another until June 12, 1907, when he founded the fitting 
department of the established firm of Excelsior Shoe Company, at Iron- 
ton, on North Second Street. This he conducted until 1909, when the 
company built an addition to the first department, and this has now 
become one of the modern factories of the Hanging Rock Region, devel- 
oped to its present proportions largely through Mr. ]\IcKee's able and 
intelligent direction. A skilled workman, he has a comprehensive knowl- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 763 

edge of every detail of the business which eomes under his supervision. 
While the greater part of his attention is given to the duties of his posi- 
tion, he has also interested himself in other enterprises, being a stock- 
holder in the company, a stockholder and director in the Union Glove 
Company of Portsmouth, Ohio, and founder of the Brotherhood Garter 
Company, of Ironton. He owns a residence at Huntington, West Vir- 
ginia, and another at South Point, Ohio, and at the latter has ten acres of 
land, on which he indulges his hobby of raising fruit and poultry. He 
has never lost his interest in educational matters, and has contributed 
of his time and means in behalf of fronton's public schools. Mr. McKee 
is a republican. He is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, 
and his fraternal connections include membership in the Masons, the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of Amer- 
ica. With his family he attends the Baptist Church. 

Mr. McKee was married at Greenup, Kentucky, May 29, 1899, to 
Miss Cora Alice DuPuy, daughter of John M. and Anna (Blair) DuPuy, 
of Portsmouth, Scioto County, Ohio. Eight children have been born 
to this union : Donald E. ; Marjorie, who is deceased ; Roy ; Ralph H. ; 
Dorothea H. ; Lorenna and Rowenna, twins, who are both deceased ; and 
Ruth May. 

IsTDOR C. Hoffman. That Isidor C. Hoffman should attain such a 
high position in the business life of Ironton before reaching his thirtieth 
year argues in itself the possession of abilities of a superior order. That 
he should be the head of the largest electric contracting company in the 
city, with the most modern and complete store in Lawrence County, evi- 
dences his organizing and executive ability. Furthermore, that he should 
be prominent in civic and social life, a stirring, active and public-spirited 
citizen, shows that he is a young man of remarkable ambition and 
determination, and that if the past may be taken as a criterion for the 
future, he should go far in whatever line of endeavor he devotes him- 
self to. 

Mr. Hoffman was born January 2, 1886, at Ironton, and is a member 
of a well known family here, Leonard J. and Mary E. (Schieder) Hoff- 
man, his parents, having both had this city for their place of nativity, 
the former born in 1862 and the latter in 1864. Leonard J. Hoffman has 
long been connected with business life at Ironton, and at present is the 
manager of a shoe store. There have been five children in the family : 
Isidor C, Norma, Phyllis, Emerson and one child who died in infancy. 
After attending the parochial school of St. Joseph's Catholic Church 
and Ironton High School, Isidor C. Hoffman started to learn the elec- 
trical trade at the age of seventeen years and was engaged thereat for a 



764 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

period of four j-ears. Following this he attended the Bliss Electrical 
School at AV^ashiiigton, D. C, and was graduated therefrom in 1908, at 
which time he returned to Ironton and established himself in business 
as the head of the Hoffman Electric Company, with a store on Park 
Avenue, between Third and Fourth streets. His success has been remark- 
able from tlie start, and his business has increased by leaps and bounds, 
so that he finds himself, while still a young man, in possession of an 
enterprise that gives him a position among the substantial business men 
of the city. He has won prosperity solely through the medium of his 
own abilities and efforts, and is worthy of the esteem in which he is 
lield by those who have come in contact with him in either a business or 
social way. 

Mr. Hoffman was married at Ironton, June 15, 1910, to Miss Harriet 
Kiinbler, daughter of Winfield and Laura (Herron) Kimbler, and to this 
union there has come one child : Harriet Vivian. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Hoffman 
are consistent and devout members of St. Joseph's Catholic Church. 
He is independent in his political views, preferring to use his own judg- 
ment in his selection of public officials rather than to depend upon party 
choice, while his fraternal connections are with the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of America, in addition 
to which he holds membership in the Ironton Chamber of Commerce. 
He is very fond of reading, is a skilled hunter and fisherman, and is also 
musically inclined, being master of traps in the Yates Saxaphone Trio. 
Altogether he fills a large place in the community in which he has always 
made his home, and his .popularity is evidenced by an ever-increasing 
circle of loyal and sincere friends. 

Clay Henry. Strict attention to business and undaunted faith in 
his ability to succeed have been foremost factors in the rise of Clay 
Henry, proprietor of a prosperous jewelry business at Ironton. His 
original business equipment included a good name, a fair endowment of 
intellect, a practical school education and a knowledge of the jewelry 
business, and with these he has combined ambition, energetic action and 
untiring persistence to such good effect that today he is one of the most 
substantial business men of his community. ]\Ir. Henry was born in 
Lawrence County. Ohio, August 23, 1848, and is a son of Briee and Cassia 
(Davisson) Henry, his mother being a daughter of Judge John Davisson, 
a pioneer, sketch of whose life is given elsewhere in this history. 

Mr. Henry also belongs to an old and honored family of this part of 
Ohio on his father's side. His great-grandfather, Rev. John Lee, came 
to the Hanging Rock Iron Region in 1811. built one of the first log 
cabins in the lower section near where Ironton now stands, and became 
one of the prominent men of the community. James Henry, the grand- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 765 

father of Clay Henry, and a cousin of Hon. Patrick Henry, the orator, 
was born in Virginia and came to the Hanging Rock Iron Region of Ohio 
in 1811, and in the following year built a log house just back of fronton 
and near the Henry cemetery. This was replaced by him in 1832 by a 
frame house, which still stands, and which is now one of the landmarks 
of the vicinity. James Henry married Elizabeth Lee, a daughter of the 
Rev. John Lee. Briee Henry was born in the original log house near 
the Henry Cemetery in Lawrence County, Ohio, ]\Iarch 9, 1815, grew to 
manhood amid pioneer surroundings, and in 1838 erected a sawmill on 
Storms Creek, one mile from its mouth. He continued to operate this 
mill until his death, in 1850, and although still a young man when he died 
had already become known as a substantial and successful citizen. He 
was married to Jane Sloan, Avho was born July 11, 1810, in Gallia County, 
Ohio. ]\Irs. Henry died May 30, 1845, having been the mother of six 
children : John S., Patrick, Clark, James B., Peter and Elizabeth. On 
July 22, 1847, ]\Ir. Henry was again married to Cassa Davisson, who 
died June 2, 1901, having been the mother of two children, namely : 
Clay and Brice. 

Until sixteen years of age. Clay Henry attended the public schools 
of fronton, and at that time began to learn the trade of jeweler. From 
1864 until 1874 he worked for others as a clerk, and in the latter year 
embarked in business on his own account, being the proprietor of an 
establishment at fronton until 1881. Succeeding this, he went to Canton, 
Ohio, where he remained until 1885, then returning to Itonton and en- 
gaging in the same business until 1901. That year saw his removal to 
Portsmouth, Scioto County, but in 1905 he again came back to Ironton, 
and this has continued to be the scene of his activities and success. 
Mr. Henry has one of the most thoroughly stocked jewelry establishments 
in this section of the state. He is a man of exceptional ability in his line 
and, as a merchant, has succeeded by many years of fair and honorable 
dealing in gaining the confidence and respect of his patrons to a notable 
degree. 

On October 6, 1881, IMr. Henry was married to Miss Pearl Mae Whit- 
comb, daughter of Rev. W. W. Whitcomb, of Ironton, and three children 
have been born to this union : Howard W., an electrical engineer now of 
New York City ; Walter L., now a partner with his father in the jewelry 
business ; and Chester B., who died at the age of 3i/^ years. Howard was 
married to iVIiss Bess Ann Rowe, of Portsmouth, Ohio; in 1911. Walter 
was married to Miss Bess Lehman, of Portsmouth in 1905 and to them 
have been born six children : Clay L., Ralph, Chester, Ruth, Jean and 
Helen. Ralph and Chester died in infancy within two months of each 
other. 

Mr. Henry was raised a Baptist and has long been a member of the 



766 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Knights of Pythias. He is a republican politically, but has not allowed 
public life to interfere with his business operations. As may be judged 
by his name his father was a stanch whig and a great admirer of Henry 
Clay, hence his name reversed. In addition to his own comfortable home, 
he owns other realty in Ironton, besides stocks in bank and manufacturing 
enterprises, and in the evening of life he is passing the years in the enjoy- 
ment of the comforts that a long and useful career has brought, sur- 
rounded by his devoted family and a wide circle of appreciative friends. 

Oscar H. Henninger, M. D. Possessing in generous measure the 
qualities which make the personally popular as well as financially suc- 
cessful physician and surgeon. Dr. Oscar H. Henninger, of Ironton, has 
a firmly established reputation as an earnest, cautious and painstaking 
healer of men. He is one of the more recent acquisitions of the medical 
profession of the Hanging Rock Region, but his youth has seemed no 
bar to his success, for he has steadily advanced in the acquirement 
of both practice and public confidence, and among his fellow-practi- 
tioners is generally accounted one who recognizes and respects the highest 
ethics of his honored calling. 

Doctor Henninger was born near Powellsville, Scioto County, Ohio, 
October 26, 1886, and is a son of Frederick W. and Mary (Staker) 
Henninger, natives of Scioto County, the former born in 1861 and the 
latter in 1865, and both now residents of Ironton, where the father has 
been engaged successfully in contracting for a long period of years. 
There were five children in the family : Oscar H., of this review; Orville, 
Cleina and Arnold, all of whom are deceased ; and Elsie, who resides at 
home with her parents. 

The primary studies of Doctor Henninger were pursued in the graded 
schools of Ironton, following which he took the high school course, and 
at the age of eighteen years entered upon his medical studies. After 
some preparation, he entered Pelle Medical College, at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and was graduated therefrom in 1909, with the degree of Doctor of 
^ledicine, following which he became an interne at Cumberland Hospital, 
Brooklyn, New York. After spending one year in this capacity. Doctor 
Henninger returned to Ironton, opened an office and began practice, 
and here he has since continued in the enjoyment of a constantly in- 
creasing practice. . Doctor Henninger belongs to the homeopathic school 
and does his own surgical work. He is able, independent and original, 
and is inclined at times to do his own thinking and to draw away from 
some of the dogmas which for generations have held medical science 
in leash. He has at all times been a close and careful student, keeping 
fully abreast of the advancements constantly being made, and is a 
valued member of the American Institute of Homeopathy and the Homeo- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 767 

pathic Society of Ohio. A genial and approachable gentleman, he is 
of sympathetic nature, and is disposed to look upon the humanitarian 
as well as the scientific side of his profession. Fraternally, Doctor 
Henninger is connected with the local lodges of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles and the Tribe of Ben liur, in all of which he has 
numerous friends. His religious faith is that of the Lutheran church. 
When he is able to absent himself from the duties of his growing prac- 
tice, he finds recreation in hunting. A democrat in politics, he has 
found both the time and inclination to devote to the best interests of 
Ironton, and at the present writing is serving capably and faithfully 
as a member of the city council. 

Glenn R. Sloan. In any district in which are centered such large 
and important industrial activities as are to be noted in Lawrence County, 
there is imperative demand that the office of county sheriff be entrusted 
a man of discrimination, circumspection, inflexible purpose and per- 
sonal courage adequate to meeting all contingencies and emergencies. 
Lawrence County at the present time is signally favored in having as its 
sheriff one of her native sons who is fully alive to and capable of 
handling the duties of his office of sheriff, and the administration of 
Mr. Sloan is proving most acceptable, even as it is showing his inviolable 
intention of preserving law and order under all conditions and circum- 
stances. Sheriff Sloan is a young man of distinctive executive ability 
and sterling character, and his genial personality has gained and retained 
to him the stanchest of friends, though malfactors within his assigned 
province have reason to realize that he shows neither fear nor favor in 
the exercise of his official prerogatives. 

Glenn R. Sloan was born in the little village of Arabia, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, on the 15th of July, 1880, and is a son of James M. and 
Amy (Powell) Sloan, both representatives of honored pioneer families 
of Lawrence County. James M. Sloan was born at Ironton, the judicial 
center of this county, in 1858, and his wife was born at Arabia, this 
county, in 1861. James M. Sloan is a miller by vocation and he and his 
wife now reside at Springfield, this state. Of the two children the pres- 
ent sheriff of Lawrence County is the elder ; Marie is the wife of Stanley 
Pierce, of Denver, Colorado, and they have two children, Emerson and 
Elizabeth. 

In his native county Glenn R. Sloan was reared to maturity, and 
here he continued to attend the public schools until he had attained to 
the age of nineteen years, after which he pursued for one year higher 
academic studies in the normal university at Lebanon, this state. He 
became one of the efficient and popular representatives of the pedagogic 



768 HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 

profession in Lawrence County, and was successfully engaged in teaching 
in the public schools from 1899 until 1907, in which latter year he was 
appointed deputy sheriff of his native county. This position he retained 
about six years, or until his election to the office of sheritf, his able and 
discriminating service in the subordinate capacity having rendered him 
a logical candidate for advancement to the full responsibilities of the 
higher post. In 1918 j\Ir. Sloan was elected sheritf of Lawrence County, 
and his administration has most fully justified the popular franchise 
which gave him the preferment. One incident worthy of mention in 
his present capacity is the fact that he had Ilarley Beard under arrest 
six hours after it was reported that the Massie family, mother, daughter 
and son, had been killed at their home on Greasy Ridge, twenty-two 
miles from Ironton. Beard is now under sentence of death. Mr. Sloan 
is unwavering in his allegiance to the republican party and in his home 
county has been an active worker in behalf of the party cause. Both he 
and his wife are popular factors in representative social activities at 
Ironton, where their circle of friends is coiiicident with that of their 
acquaintances. In the time-honored Masonic fraternity Sheriff Sloan 
has completed the circle of the York Rite, in which his maximum affilia- 
tion is with the Ironton commandery of Knights Templar. In his home 
city he is affiliated also with the Knights of Pythias, the Modern Wood- 
men of America, and the Knights of the Golden Eagle. 

On the 2d of February, 1905, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Sloan to Miss Katherine Callahan, daughter of Hugh and IMargaret 
Callahan, well known residents of Ironton. No children have been born 
of this union. 

John H. Giiolson. A life of steadfast integrity and honor and of 
large and worthy achievement was that of the late John H. Gholson, who 
was a resident, of Lawrence County from the time of his birth until he 
was summoned to eternal rest, at his home in the City of Ironton, on the 
6th of October, 1906, secure in the confidence and high regard of all who 
knew him. He was long numbered among the representative business 
men of Ironton, and the undertaking business which he here conducted 
for many years is continued by his widow and sons. He was a scion of 
a sterling pioneer family of Lawrence Coiinty, and as an honored and 
influential citizen whose course was ordered iipon a high plane in all its 
relations, it is incumbent that in this history there be accorded a definite 
tribute to his memory. 

Mr. Gholson was born at Kelley's JMills, in Elizabeth township, Law- 
rence County, Ohio, on the 24th of July, 1844, and was the youngest of 
the nine children of James H. and Sarah Gholson, early settlers of the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 76y 

county. He was but six years of age at the time of the family removal 
to Ironton, and in this city his parents passed the residue of their lives, 
his also being the privih'ge of continuing to maintain his home in the 
metropolis and judicial center of his native county until he too was 
called from the stage of life's mortal endeavors, after having attained 
to the age of more than three score yeax's. ^Ir. Gholson made good use 
of the advantages afforded in the common schools, as is evident when we 
revert to the fact that when sixteen years of age he was granted a 
teacher's certificate, though liis active work in the pedagogic profession 
was of brief duration. After holding for a short time the position of 
storekeeper in one of the pioneer mills of Ironton, he here engaged in 
the retail grocery business, in which he continued until the early p&vt 
of the year 1871, when he withdrew from this line of enterprise to become 
associated with the undertaking business conducted by his brother-in-law, 
the late George F. Buchanan. He entered upon his new duties on the 
29th of May, 1871, and at the time he inscribed the date on the wall of 
the bviilding in which the business was established. This inscription 
remained in evidence until after his death, more than thirty years later. 
Mr. Gholson was soon admitted to partnership in the business, and upon 
the death of Mr. Gholson, about the year 1892, he became the sole 
owner of the undertaking establishment and business. Eventually he 
admitted to partnership his two .sons, Walter W. and John Harvey, and 
thereafter the entei'prise was successfully continued under the name of 
J. II. Gholson & Sons until his death, the establishment since that time 
having been conducted under the original title and under the direct 
supervision of the sons and their mother, the stock and facilities, having 
at all times been maintained at the highest standard and the sons being 
recognized today as the leading funeral directors of their native city. 
At the time of his demise jNIr. Gholson was the oldest undertaker in the 
city, and the community has every reason to remember tis name Avith 
reverent affection, for he was a man whose heart was attuned to deep 
human sympathy and his consideration, kindliness and many acts of 
charity and benevolence gained to him secure place in the hearts of all 
who knew him. 

]Mr. Gholson manifested his intrinsic loyalty and patriotism at the 
time of the Civil war, for he enlisted in Company I, Ninth Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he proceeded to the front and with which he par- 
ticipated in many engagements marking the pi'Ogress of the great con- 
flict through which the integrity of the Union was preserved. He served 
during the major part of the war and proved a gallant soldier as well 
as one popular with his comrades in arms. In later years he perpetuated 
the more gracious memories of his military career by retaining mem- 



770 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

bership in the Ironton Post of the Grand Army of the Republic. He 
was a republican in his political allegiance and was a zealous member 
of the Presbyterian Church in his home city. Here also he was affiliated 
with Ohio Valley Lodge, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, a fra- 
ternity with which he was identified for forty years, and with the Iron- 
ton lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Mr. Gholson had been in impaired 
health for several years prior to his death, which resulted from a drop- 
sical affection of the heart, and he bore his sufferings with characteristic 
patience and fortitude, ever showing consideration for those who minis- 
tered to him. The entire community manifested a sense of personal loss 
and bereavement when he was summoned to the life eternal, and his 
funeral was attended by all classes, the Grand Army of the Republic 
and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows appearing in respective 
bodies. 

The domestic chapter in the life history of Mr. Gholson was of ideal 
order, and there can be no wish to lift the gracious veil that made the 
home a sanctuary, though it is incumbent that brief record be made con- 
cerning his marriage and children. In the City of Ironton, on the 10th 
of December, 1878, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Gholson to Miss 
Susan S. Wells, who was born at Delaware, Ohio, on the 24th of January, 
1854, and who is a daughter of William W. and Mary Margaret (Bogan) 
Wells. Her father was born in Germany and died when Mrs. Gholson 
was a child, and she was about seven years old when the devoted and 
widowed mother likewise was summoned to eternal rest, in 1861. Mrs. 
Gholson was reared in the home of her elder sister, Mary, who is the 
wife of Martin Heller, their home being at Delaware, Ohio. The thi-ee 
eldest children of the Wells family were Samuel G., Mary and Virginia, 
all of whom are now deceased; Anna M'as the next in order of birth; 
Charles is a resident of Delaware, Ohio ; Chauncey is deceased ; and Mrs. 
Gholson is the youngest of the number. Mrs. Gholson is a woman of 
most gracious personality and has been a loved and prominent factor 
in the representative social activities of her home city, which has been en- 
deared to her by the hallowed memories and associations of many years. 
She holds membership in the Wesley Chapel and has been active in the 
various departments of church and benevolent work. Mr. and Mrs. Ghol- 
son became the parents of three children, Walter W., John Harvey, and 
Grace B., the only daughter having died at the age of two years. The 
active management of the undertaking business so long conducted by the 
subject of this memoir is now entrusted to the sons, Walter W. and J. 
Harvey, who, with the able co-operation of their mother, are fully up- 
holding in this line the high reputation of the honored father. Walter 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 771 

AV. Gholson wedded ]\Iiss Lydia Deering, and they have three children, 
Doris D., John D., and Nathaniel R. J. Harvey married Birdie Sandford. 

Charles H. Foit. The value of a useful vocation and a thorough 
training, of concentrating one's energy upon one line of endeavor, of 
forging steadily ahead regardless of obstacles and difficulties, has found 
emphatic expression in the career of Charles H. Foit, proprietor of the 
Iron City Baking Company, of Ironton, Ohio, and a citizen who has 
taken an active part in those affairs which have contributed to the better- 
ment of his community. INIr. Foit was born at Pine Grove, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, November 22, 1878, and is a son of John and Lena 
(]\Ieyers) Foit, natives of that place, where the father was born in 1849 
and the mother in 1851. John Foit, who has been engaged in coal mining 
during the greater part of his life, still makes his home at Pine Grove, 
and is a well known and substantial citizen. There were six children in 
the family : Charles II., Amelia, John, Jr., Annie, William and Barney. 

Charles II. Foit was given but meagre educational advantages, as he 
attended the public schools of Pine Grove only until the age of eleven 
years, but made the most of his opportunities and was an industrious and 
receptive student. On leaving school he entered upon his responsibilities 
as a worker in the coal mines, remaining four years and then coming to 
Ironton, where he became an apprentice under Andy Able, who was at 
that time proprietor of the old Iron City Bakery. Mr. Foit worked for 
Mr. Alile for one year at wages of $1.50 per week, remaining with him 
until he thoroughly learned the trade of baker, and when the bakery was 
incorporated into a stock company he had so demonstrated his business 
and executive ability that he was given the position of manager, which 
he held until 1910, in the meantime acquiring an interest in the business. 
In that year he became sole owner by buying the stock of the other stock- 
holders, and at this time is at the head of this enterprise, which is valued 
at aliout fifteen thousand dollars, and owns the plant at Third and Law- 
rence streets. Mr. Foit has gained a full measure of success by his strict 
attention to business, his unswerving integrity in all transactions and his 
fidelity to every engagement. He is widely known in the trade, and the 
high confidence and esteem in which he is held by his associates has been 
evidenced by his election to the office of treasurer of the Ohio State Master 
Jiakers' Association, lie is a stockholder of the National Pretzel Com- 
pany, and in addition to his baking plant is owner of his own comfortable 
residence at Fourth and Vernon streets. Mr. Foit is a republican in his 
political views, and at this time is a candidate for the office of county 
commissioner. He takes an active and sincere interest in the welfare of 
his city, as evidence by his membership in the Chamber of Coiiiinercc. 



772 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

where he is chairman of the house committee. Fraternally he holds 
membership in the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Knights 
of Columbus and the Modern Woodmen of America, and his religious 
affiliation is with St. Joseph's Catholic Church. An enthusiastic sports- 
man, he is popular with his fellow members in the Symes Creek Fishing 
Club. 

Mr. Foit was married at Ironton, June 6, 1900, to Miss Amelia Hoff- 
man, daughter of Charles Hoffman, a pioneer settler of West Ironton, and 
four children have been born to this union : Alma, Charlotte, Ruth and 
Walter. 

James F. McConnell. The City of Ironton has become one of the 
most thriving and prosperous commercial and industrial centers of the 
Hanging Rock and Calumet Region, and its prestige in the business world 
is due to the efforts and activities of such men as James F. McConnell, 
who for twenty years has been engaged as a com.mission merchant in the 
line of wholesale fruits and produce. Mr. McConnell's contributions in 
advancing the material interests of Ironton are so generally recognized 
that they may be considered as no secondary part of his career of useful- 
ness, for he belongs to that class which appreciates the fact that commu- 
nity prosperity spells individual success. 

Mr. McConnell was born at Gallipolis, Ohio, March 18,- 1867, and is a 
son of James W. and Amelia (Wooly) McConnell. His father, born in 
Pennsylvania in 1835, was brought to Ohio as a lad of seven years, the 
family locating in Gallia County, and there he has spent his life, his 
active career being devoted to the trade of cooper. He retired from active 
pursuits in 1912 and is now living quietly at Gallipolis. Mrs. McConnell, 
who was born in Pennsylvania in 1842, died in 1885. There were ten 
children in the family of James W. and Amelia McConnell, namely: 
Flora, who is single ; Charles, who died at the age of twenty-one years ; 
James F., of this review ; Belle, who married Col. A. M. Woolridge, a coal 
operator of West Virginia; Morris, who is storekeeper at the Gallipolis 
Hospital ; Fred, who is a coal operator in West Virginia ; Anna, who died 
at the age of eighteen years; Robert, an engineer on the C. & 0. Railway ; 
Clara, who married Sam JMcConnahay, of Dakota, West Vii'ginia ; and 
Thomas, who is a clerk in the offices of the C. & 0. Railway. 

James F. McConnell attended the public schools of Gallipolis, Ohio, 
until sixteen years of age and then entered upon his career in the capacity 
of clerk in a grocery store of his native place. He came to Ironton in 
1892 and became a salesman for a shoe company here, but in 1894 entered 
business on his own account, and since that time has been engaged as a 
wholesale commission merchant, handling fruit and produce. His biisi- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 773 

iiess has grown steadily, and in addition ho has inteivsted himself in 
various other enterprises, being president of the Iron City Building and 
Loan Association and a stockholder and director in several of I ronton "s 
and Lawrence County's important industries. 'His large business inter- 
ests make him a very busy man, yet he has found time to assist the city in 
its advancement in various ways. For many years he was financial 
secretary of the old board of trade and at this time is a member of the 
chamber of commerce, is a member of the board of health and president 
of the Board of the Children's Home, and no worthy movement is con- 
sidered complete that does not have his name on its list of supporters. 
Since 1904 Mr. McCounell has been agent at Ironton for the American 
Express Company. He owns his own home at Ironton, in addition to 
several other pieces of city realty, and has also 540 acres of good farming 
land in Scioto County. In polities Mr. MeConnell is a democrat, with 
independent leanings. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church, in the work of which he has taken an active part, and at this 
time holds membership on the board of triastees. 

On March 9, 1898, at the home of the bride, ]Mr. ]\IcConnell was mar- 
ried to Miss Jennie Davis, daughter of George B. Davis, one of the first 
ironworkers of the old iron region. Three cliildren have been born to 
this iinion : Miriam, Clara and Gwendolyn. 

Frank F. Goldcamp. Identified with some of the leading commercial 
and financial institutions of Ironton, Frank F. Goldcamp is justly ac- 
counted one of the progressive and capable business men of this place 
and has also taken an active part in civic affairs. His career is indicative 
of the rewards to be attained through a life of industry and well-directed 
effort, and as a meml)er of the firm of Goldcamp Brothers & Company, 
hardware merchants, he is contributing materially to the business impor- 
tance of the county seat of Lawrence County. Mr. Goldcamp is a product 
of this county, having been 1)orn at Lawrence Furnaee, October 21, 1858, 
and is a son of Ferdinand H. and Mary A. (Monnig) Goldcamp. 

Ferdinand H. Goldcamp was born at Old Union Furnace. Hanging 
Rock, Ohio, March 9, 1837, to which locality his father had come as an 
early settler in 1835. His active career was passed in agricultural pur- 
suits, but at this time he is retired and makes liis home at Ironton. Mrs. 
Goldcamp was born at Pine Grove, Lawrence County, Noveml)er 18, 1839. 
There were teii children in the family, viz: Frank F., of this review; 
Mary G. ; Josephine C. ; John F. ; Albeit J., wlio is decea.sed ; Joseph II.; 
Henry I.; Fred, who is deceased; Elizabeth F. and Flora A. ]\Iaiy G. 
married F. L. :McCaully, of Ironton, died in 1884, and left one cliild, 
John A., who is a hardware merchant at Lanca.ster. Ohio; Josephine C. 



774 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

married Henry C. Rudmann, a member of the firm of Goldcamp Brothers 
& Company, and has had three children, of whom one survives, Charles 
S. ; John F. married Theresa Laler, is a partner in the hardware firm, and 
has two children, Gertrude and Eugene ; Joseph H., a hardware merchant 
of Lancaster, married Alice Kreamer and has two children, Lawrence 
and Cyril ; Henry I., a farmer on the old home place at Goldcamp Station, 
on the D. T. & I. Railway, married Margaret Gallagher and has had nine 
children, Charles, ^lary, Edward, Mildred, Leo, Joseph, Alberta and one 
child deceased ; Elizabeth F. married Dr. Cornelius Gallagher, of Ironton, 
and has had nine children, Mary, Genevieve, Charles, Harry, John, Eliza- 
beth, Marcella, Cornelius F. and one who died in infancy ; and Flora A. 
married Fred Dearford, proprietor of a livery and sales barn at Ironton, 
and has two children, Mary and John. 

Frank F. Goldcamp attended the public schools of Lawrence County 
until he was sixteen years of age, in the meantime assisting his father in 
the work of the home farm. He remained under the parental roof until 
reaching his majority, when he became a student at Lebanon University, 
but after five months left that institution and returned to the farm for 
five weeks. At this time he came to Ironton and began his business career 
as a clerk in the grocery store of F. E. Hayward & Co., in whose employ 
he remained six years, gaining much valuable experience. He carefully 
saved his earnings and in 1887 purchased an interest in the Goldcamp 
Milling Company, with which he was identified until 1903. In 1903 he 
became actively engaged in the hardware business which he had bought 
in 1893, purchasing the stock and good will of H. D. Newcomb at Second 
and Lawrence streets, Ironton. This business is now conducted under a 
partnership, the members of the firm being John F. and Frank F. Gold- 
camp and Henry C. Rudmann, and the enterprise is possessed of a stock 
valued at $16,000. The business has enjoyed marked prosperity, and 
much of this is due to the good judgment, shrewdness and capability of 
Frank F. Goldcamp. who attributes his success to his constant applica- 
tion and thorough knowledge of every detail of the trade. While the 
greater part of his attention is given to this enterprise, Mr. Goldcamp 
has also interested himself in other ventures and is at this time a stock- 
holder and director in the Citizens National Bank, and a stockholder in 
the First National Bank and the jMartin Iron and Steel Company. He 
also owns several valuable pieces of realty at Ironton, including his own 
handsome residence. Mr. Goldcamp is a democrat, but has not been par- 
ticularly active in politics. With his family, lie attends St. Joseph's 
Catholic- Church. He has spent much time in travel, and whenever he 
can spare the leisure from his business responsibilities takes his family 
on extended trips 1o various points of interest in this countrv. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 775 

Mr. Goldcamp was married at Ironton, September 9, 1884, to Miss 
Lena A. Heitzman, daughter of Bernard Heitzman, who is identified with 
the iron mills at Ironton, and to this union there have been born four chil- 
dren : Henry B., a clerk with the house of Goldcamp Brothers & Company, 
married Kathren Boice and has had two children, Donald and one who 
died in infancy ; Albert L., who is engaged in the grocery business at 
Ironton, married Clara Young; Frank J., who is a clerk in the grocery 
store of his brother; and Clarence, who is still attending school. 

Isaac JMearan. As a mere boy Mr. Mearan came from his native 
Germany to the United States, and as a stranger in a strange land, with 
but slight command of the English language and without influential 
friends or financial reinforcement, he proved himself equal to the task 
that confronted him and has achieved through his own efforts distinctive 
and gratifying success. He is now numbered among the representative 
merchants and popular citizens of Ironton, Lawrence County, in which 
city he is junior member of the firm of McNary & Mearan, which is en- 
gaged in the clothing and men's furnishing goods business, with a well 
appointed and essentially metropolitan establishment on South Second 
Street. 

Mr. Mearan was born in Germany, on the 19th of Decemlier, 1876, and 
the excellent schools of his native land afforded him his early educational 
advantages. He subsequently severed the home ties and, with indom- 
itable ambition and self-reliance, set forth, alone, to seek his fortunes in 
the United States. For some time he found employment in the City of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and in 1893 he came to Ironton, Ohio, where 
he was an efficient and popular salesman in the clothing store of A. J. 
Brumberg until 1904, when he put his experience and ambition into ef- 
fective play by initiating an independent enterprise in the same field of 
business. He formed a partnership with Erwin E. McNary, concerning 
whom individual mention is made elsewhere in this publication, and they 
established their present business, under the firm name of McNary & 
Mearan. The business has become one of the most successful of its kind 
in Ironton and the finely equipped store caters to the best class of trade, 
with a select and comprehensive stock of clothing and the most attractive 
lines of furnishing goods, the two members of the firm having found that 
one of their best assets is the strong hold they personally have upon 
popular confidence and esteem. 

Mr. Mearan has aligned himself as a supporter of the cause of the 
republican party, holds membership in the Ironton Chamber of Com- 
merce, and is affiliated with the local lodge of the Benevolent and Pro- 
tective Order of Elks. He is not only enterprising and energetic as a 



776 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

business man, but is known also as a citizen of distinct progressiveness 
and public spirit — one interested in all that tends to advance the civic 
and material welfare of the community. 

On the 27th of November, 1903, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Mearan to Miss Sadie Cohen, daughter of Mose Cohen, who was at 
the time a resident of Ironton and extensively engaged in the lumber 
business in Lawrence Connty. Since 1907 Mr. and Mrs. Cohen have main- 
tained their home at Hunt.ing4:on, West Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Mearan 
have two cliildren — Antonia Lila and Hugh Lester. 

Erwix E. .McNary. Among the younger business men of Ironton 
this energetic, wide-awake merchant has been numbered for the past 
ten years. His career is but another proof of the statement that prac- 
tical industry, wisely and vigorously applied, never fails to win suc- 
cess, for with only ordinary advantages in his youth, he started out 
to make his own Avay in the world, and his diligence and judicious man- 
agement have brought him a full measure of prosperity for his labors. 
^Ir. McNary has spent his entire life at Ironton, having been born here 
January 21, 1879. a son of William and Eleanor (Woods) McNary. 

William ]\IcNary was born in Pennsylvania in 1842. and there grew 
up amid agricultural surroundings, so that on reaching his majority 
he adopted farming as his life work. He was twenty-eight years of 
age when he came to Lawrence County, and here, in the vicinity of 
Ironton. be rounded out a life of usefulness and industry in the pur- 
suits of the soil, passing away in 1902, with the respect and esteem of 
those who had known him. Mrs. McNary, who was born at Stetiben- 
ville, Ohio, survived her husband for some time, dying in 1910, when 
seventy years of age. They became the parents of six children, of whom 
all survive at this time : Elmer, in the real estate business in Granite City, 
Illinois; George engaged in the grocery business in Ironton; Dr. Wilber, 
a successful practicing physician of East St. Louis, Illinois; Minnie, a 
stenographer in Ironton ; Margaret, mIio is also a stenographer and makes 
lier home at Ironton ; and Erwin E., of this review. 

Erwin E. ]McNary prosecuted his studies in the graded and high 
schools of Ironton, and after his graduation from the latter in 1896 
received his introduction to commercial life in the capacity of clerk 
for the clothing business conducted by A. J. Brumlierg, a merchant 
of this city. He remained with ]\Ir. Brumberg. thoroughly familiarizing 
himself with every detail of the business until 1904, when, feeling quali- 
fied to enter business on his own account, he invested his capital in a 
stock of clothing and gentlemen's furnishing goods, and in partner- 
ship with ]\Ir. Isaac Mearan opened an establishment Avhich has steadily 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 777 

fidvanced in patronage and public favor. JNIr. McNary fortunately pos- 
sesses those qualifications which are essential to success in any line of 
business, and, having had much experience in the commercial world, is 
an able man of business. Thoroughly understanding the needs and 
wants of his customers, he spares no efforts to please them and to meet 
their wishes in every regard. He devotes his time strictly to his busi- 
ness, but when he is able to lay its cares aside, finds enjoyment in fishing 
and hunting trips. A member of the Chamber of Commerce, the high 
esteem in which he is held by his associates is evidenced by the fact that 
he has been elected a member of the board of directors of that body, a 
position which he now holds. Mr. McNary is a republican, but not an 
active politician. He is a consistent member of the Episcopal church, 
and his fraternal connections are with the Benevolent and Protective 
Order of Elks and the Modern Woodmen of America. He has shown 
his faith in the future of Ironton by investing his means in real estate 
in this locality. 

Mr. McNary was married February 22, 1902, at Ironton, to Miss 
Mildred Peters, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Peters, who died 
about 1892, and whose family belonged to the oldest settlers of the 
mining locality of the Hanging Rock Iron Region. Three children have 
been born to Mr. and Mrs. McNary: Mildred and Ethelyn, twins, the 
latter of whom died in 1913 ; and Helen. 

Frank F. J. Goldcamp. Few names have been more conspicuously 
and worthily identified with the civic and business activities of the city 
of Ironton than that of the Goldcamp family, and it is pleasing to be 
able to offer in this publication specific mention of various representa- 
tives of this influential and honored family of the Hanging Rock Iron 
District. 

He whose name initiates this review is one of the interested principals 
and the executive head of the Goldcamp Mill Company, which represents 
one of the important industrial enterprises of Ironton, with a flour 
mill that is thoroughly modern in its equipment and facilities. Mr. 
Goldcamp was bom at Lawrence Furnace, Lawrence County, Ohio, on 
the 14th of November, 1861, and is a son of John S. and Mary (Friska) 
Goldcamp, members of sterling pioneer families of this section of the 
state. Both John S. Goldcamp and his wife were bom at Pine Grove, 
Lawrence County, Ohio, the former in 1840 and the latter in 1845. The 
father early became a successful contractor in hauling iron ore from the 
mines to the mills in Ironton, before this now thriving city had railroad 
facilities, and after the building of the Norfolk & "Western Railroad to 
the city he erected, in 1888, a flour mill in Ironton. Through circum- 



778 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

speetion and honorable policies he built up a prosperous business as a 
manufacturer of flour and other mill products and he continued to be 
one of the well known and highly esteemed citizens and influential busi- 
ness men of Lawrence County until his death, which occurred in 1909, 
his widow still maintaining her residence in Ironton. Of the twelve 
children Frank F. J., of this review, is the first-born, and the names of 
the others are here entered in respective order of birth: Annie C, Emma 
I., Ida L., John X., May G., Laura C, Otto F., Victoria, Lizzie, and two 
who died in infancy. 

Frank F. J. Goldcamp attended the public schools of Ironton until he 
had attained to the age of fourteen years, when he began to assist his 
father in the latter 's teaming operations in the handling of iron ore. 
After the construction of the flour mill mentioned above he continued 
to assist his father in the practical and executive management of the 
enterprise until 1902, when he purchased an interest in the Whiting 
Soap Company, of Ironton. He was secretary and treasurer of this cor- 
poration for two years, at the expiration of which he became asso- 
ciated with his brother John X. in the erection and equipment of their 
present fine flour mill, which they have successfully operated since 1904, 
under the title of the Goldcamp Mill Company. Frank F. J. Goldcamp 
is president of this progressive company, which has a capital stock of 
$40,000, and is known and valued as one of the enterprising and repre- 
sentative business men and influential citizens of the city that has been 
his home from his childhood and to the civic and commercial advance- 
ment of which he has made definite and worthy contribution. Mr. Gold- 
camp is a stockholder and director of the First National Bank of Iron- 
ton and he is the owner of valuable property in Ironton, including a 
half interest in the mill and warehouse and also his attractive residence, 
which is known for its generous hospitality. He is actively identified 
with the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, the Ohio Millers' Association 
and the Millers' Federation of the United States. His political allegiance 
is given to the democratic party and he and his wife are zealous com- 
municants of the Catholic Church, in which they are members of the 
parish of St. Joseph's Church, in which Mr. Goldcamp is serving as 
warden. 

On the 24th of April, 1883, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. CoUl- 
camp to Miss Mary Ann Mauerer, daughter of Adam and An)iie 
(Chauzle) Mauerer, of Lawrence County. Of this union have been born 
six children : Stephen W., M. D., who is engaged in the practice of his 
profession in the City of Youngstown, Ohio, married Miss Edna Renner; 
Edward C. likewise is a graduate physician and surgeon and now resides 
in the city of Providence, Rhode Island ; Hilda M. is the wife of p]dvvard 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 779 

Weinfurther, of Ashland, Kentucky ; Adam F., died in infancy ; Cyril 
F. and John S., attending the public schools of Ironton. 

George J. Goldcamp. One of the native sons of Ironton, Lawrence 
County, whose career has been marked by consecutive industry and 
definite advancement is he whose name initiates this review and who is 
numbered among the representative and popular merchants of Ironton, 
where he is associated with his brother Robert S. in the ownership and 
conducting of the substantial furniture and general house-furnishing 
establishment of the Goldcamp Furniture Company. 

Mr. Goldcamp was born in Ironton on the 5th of October, 1877, and 
is a son of Isadore X. and Julia Ann (Kruse) Goldcamp, the former of 
whom was born at Lawrence Furnace, Lawrence County, in 1852, and the 
latter of whom was born at Pine Grove, this county, in 1852, both fami- 
lies having been represented in the pioneer settlement of the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region of Ohio. Isadore X. Goldcamp held for a long period 
the position of salesman for the W. A. Murdock Wholesale Grocery 
Company, of Ironton, and since 1901 he has lived virtually retired in 
this city, both he and his wife being earnest communicants of St. Joseph 's 
Catholic church and his political allegiance being given to the demo- 
cratic party. Of the five children all are living except the youngest, 
Edward, the names of the others being here given in respective order of 
birth : William J., George J., Robert S., and Martha ]M. 

George J. Goldcamp attended the parochial school of St. Joseph's 
church until he was fifteen years old, and for four months thereafter 
he held a position as salesman in the retail grocery of J. T. Clark. For 
the ensuing year he was employed in connection with a local lumber 
business and he then assumed a position in the hardwood finishing depart- 
ment of the Ironton Wood Mantel Company, with which industrial cor- 
poration he continued to be thus identified for five years. Then, to for- 
tify himself more thoroughly along educational lines of practical order, 
he completed a six months' course in the commercial or business depart- 
ment of the Ohio Normal University, at Ada, Hardin county. A few 
months later he entered the employ of the United States Steel Corpora- 
tion, in its mills at Mingo Junction, Jefferson County, Ohio, where he 
had charge of the electric motor utilized in transferring ore to the 
furnace. After six months' incumbency of this position ]\Ir. Goldi-amp 
returned to Ironton, in 1903, and became associated with the late Frank 
Mechling in establishing a retail furniture business in eligible quarters 
at the corner of Second Street and Park Avenue. Mr. Mechling retired 
from the business about eighteen months later and ]\Ir. Goldcamp then 
admitted to partnership in the business his younger brother, Robert S., 



780 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

who has since continued as his valued coadjutor in the management of 
the splendid business enterprise which they have built up through effect- 
ive service and those honorable policies that ever beget popular confidence 
and support. The large and well appointed establiski'nent of the Gold- 
camp Furniture Company is maintained at the original location men- 
tioned above, and the stock includes select and complete lines of furni- 
ture and household furnishings, such as rugs, draperies, carpets, etc. 

Mr. Goldcamp is essentially an enterprising business man, but has 
not become self-centered to the avoidance of proper and loyal interest 
in the general welfare of his home city, his attitude being* that of a 
liberal and progressive citizen. He is a bachelor, is a member of the 
Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is a democrat in politics, is a commun- 
icant of the Catholic Church, and is atfiliated with the Knights of 
Columbus and the Society of St. George. 

John X. Goldcamp. Associated with his brother. Prank F. J. Gold- 
camp, in the ownership and control of the flourishing industrial enter- 
prise conducted under the title of the Goldcamp Mill Company, John 
X. Goldcamp is one of the prominent business men and popular citizens 
of his native city of Ironton, the metropolis and judicial center of 
Lawrence County. In the sketch of the career of his brother, Frank 
F. J., appearing on other pages of this work, are given adequate data con- 
cerning the family record of long association with Lawrence County, and 
thus it is unnecessary to repeat the information in the present connec- 
tion. The Goldcamp Mill Company, capitalized for $40,000, operates 
an admirably e(iuipped flour mill of the most approved modern facilities 
and the enterprise proves a valuable adjunct to the industrial activities 
of Ironton and Lawrence counties. 

John X. Goldcamp was born at Ironton on the 30th of December, 
1872, and is a son of the late John S. Goldcamp, who was long a promi- 
nent figure in the business life of Ironton, whei-e he died in 1909 and 
where his widow still. resides. John X. Goldcamp continued to attend 
the school of Ironton until he had completed a two years' course in the 
high school, and at the age of seventeen he became actively concerned 
with the operation of the fiour mill conducted by his father. He served 
for nine years as representative of his father's mill in its trade territory 
in West Virginia, where he made an excellent record a a salesman. 
AVlien, in 1903, the business of the original mill was sold John X. pur- 
chased its retail branch, at the corner of South Third and Vernon Streets, 
Ii-onton, and he conducted the same until 1905, when he became asso- 
ciated with his brotlier Frank F. J. in the organization of the Goldcamp 
:\IilI Company and in the erection of its excellent plant, at the corner of 



HANGINa ROCK IRON REGION 781 

Second and Ellison Streets. Since that time he has assumed much of 
the practical and administrative management of the substantial enter- 
prise, and both as a man of affairs and as a liberal and progressive citi- 
zen he is held in unequivocal esteem in his home city and native county. 
He owns a half interest in the mill property, is a director of the Ohio 
Millers' Association and in all that touches the welfare and advancement 
of Ironton he maintains a lo3'al and helpful interest. He is a member 
of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is a democrat in his political pro- 
clivities and both he and his wife are communicants of St. Joseph's 
Catholic Church. 

On the ISth of October, 1899, :\Ir. Goldcamp wedded Miss Isabella L. 
Silbnan. daughter of John and Martha Sillman, her father being a 
representative farmer of Lawrence County. The two children of this 
union are Sylvious J. and Siderina 1. 

Pkteb L. Henry. This honored citizen and representative business 
man of the City of Ironton, where he is district manager for the Com- 
monwealth Accident Insui-ance Company, of Philadelphia, is a scion of 
a family that was founded in Lawrence County nearly a century ago 
and the name of A\hich has been most worthily linked with the civic and 
industrial history of this section of the Buckeye state. Mr. Henry is a 
man whose life has been guided and governed by the loftiest principles 
of integrity and honor and his abiding Christian faith has been shown 
both in words and deeds, with the result that he commands impregnable 
vantage-place in the confidence and high regard of all who know him. 
Virtually his entire life thus far has been passed within the borders of 
Lawrence County and here he has been called upon to serve in various 
offices of public trust, the while he has ever been kindly, generous and 
tolerant, and ready to aid those in affliction and distress, as well as zeal- 
ous in the furtherance of those things which represent the higher ideals 
of life. 

Peter Lee Henry was born in Hamilton Township, Lawrence County, 
Ohio, on the 31st of December, 1856, and thus became a right welcome 
Christmas guest in the home of his parents, Isaiah and Ada (Langdon) 
Ilenrv. both likewise natives of Lawrence County, where the respective 
families settled prior to the admission of the state to the Union. Isaiah 
Henry was boi-n on a farm in Upper Township, this county, on the 7th 
of April. 1817. and liei-e he devoted the major part of his active life to 
agricultural pursuits, though he Avas also a skilled artisan as a stone 
mason. He served during the Civil wai' as a member of the Home Guards 
of Lawrence County and he was one of the honored pioneer citizens of 
till' i-ninit\- at tile time of liis death, in 1893. His widow, who was bom 



782 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

in the village of Getaway, Lawrence County, on the 28th of May, 1816, 
survived him by more than a decade and was summoned to the life eternal 
in 1906, at the extremely venerable age of ninety years. Both were de- 
vout members of the Baptist Church and they lived godly, righteous and 
useful lives. The names of their nine children are here entered in 
respective order of birth: Samuel C, Elizabeth J., Mahala, Cassa A., 
James J., Isaac N. and William J. (twins), John W. and Peter L. 

Mahala, who is deceased, was the wife of Rev. Patrick Henry, a 
clergyman of the Methodist Episcopal Church in Ironton ; James J., who 
became a minister of the Methodist Church, died at the age of thirty 
years. 

Peter L. Henry passed the days of his boyhood and youth on the 
home farm, in Hamilton Township, and in the district schools he acquired 
his rudimentary education. Thereafter he attended the public schools 
in the Village of Hanging Rock until he had completed. one year's study 
in the high school, and in pursuance of higher academic discipline he 
entered the National Normal University, at Lebanon, where he was a 
student for two terms and where he fortified himself for the work of 
the pedagogic profession. From 1886 to 1893 he was a successful and 
popular teacher in the public schools of his native county, and he then 
brought into requisition his excellent technical ability as a carpenter 
and brick and stone mason, being' employed at these trades until 1896, 
when he engaged in independent operations as a contractor and builder. 
Maintaining his residence in his native township, he continued to ])e 
actively and successfully identified with this line of enterprise for more 
than ten years, and within this decade he erected many buildings and 
did other important contract work in Lawrence County. He became an 
expert in the construction of cisterns, and at the present time his advice 
is frequently sought in connection with the repairing and l)uilding of 
such repositories for water. 

In 1907 Mr. Henry opened an office in Ironton and became district 
manager, for four counties, for the Commonwealth Accident Insurance 
Company, of Philadelphia, and for this substantial and representative 
insurance corporation he has been successful in developing a lai'g*^ and 
prosperous business in his jurisdiction. 

In politics Mr. Henry is aligned as a stalwart advocate of tlie prin- 
ciples of the democratic party and he is well fortified in his opinions 
concerning matters of governmental and economic import. In Hamilton 
Township he served eighteen years as president of the school board and 
four years as justice of the peace, besides which he represented the town- 
ship for one year as a member of the board of county commissioners. He 
is implacable in his opposition to the liquor traffic, and has served since 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 783 

1909 as president of the Local Option League of Lawrence County, besides 
which his zealous activities in behalf of moralitj^ and social well-being are 
shown in his influential service in connection with religious affairs. He is 
president of the Ministerial Evangelical Association of Ironton and both 
he and his wife are most devout members of the Pine Street Methodist 
Episcopal Church. Mr. Henry became a member of the church when 
he was a lad of eleven years, and much of zeal and consecration has 
marked his service in the vineyard of the Divine Master. He held for 
a number of years the position of Sunday School superintendent and is 
at the present time a valued teacher in the Sunday School of the church 
with which he is identified. He has held virtually all offices to which a 
layman is eligible in the ^Methodist Church, and he gives earnest support 
to all extraneous measures and enterprises advanced for the moral bet- 
terment of the community. Mr. Henry is the owner of an attractive 
residence property in Ironton and still retains his old homestead place, 
comprising eight acres, in Hamilton Township. There he gave special 
attention to the raising of strawberries for a number of years, becoming 
an expert in this branch of horticulture, in which his daughters were his 
able assistants. 

On the 19th of September, 1878, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Henry to Miss Ruhama Berkley, Mho was born and reared in 
Lawrence County and who is a daughter of James H. and Elizabeth A. 
(Davidson) Berkley, well known residents of this county, where they 
continued to reside until their death. The marriage ceremony of Mr. 
and Mrs. Henry was performed at Ironton, by Rev. James M. Kelly, a 
pioneer clergyman of the Baptist Church in this section of the state. Of 
this union have been born nine children, of whom seven are living, the 
following complete list designating the respective order of births : 
William L., Maude M., Isaac N., Bertha, Wilmot W., Grover C, Ethel 
M., Olie A. and Amy. William L. died in infancy, and Grover C. passed 
away when fourteen years of age. 

John S. Wiseman, M. D. Prominent among those who are uphold- 
ing the dignity and prestige of the medical profession in Lawrence 
County is Dr. Wiseman, who is engaged in practice in the City of 
Ironton, judicial center of the county and the metropolis of the Hang- 
ing Rock Iron Region. The success and high reputation achieved by the 
Doctor are the more pleasing to note by reason of the fact that lie 
claims as his native heath the county in which he has gained this prec- 
edence through ability and sterling worth of character. Dr. Wiseman 
was born in the village of Sherritts, Lawrence County, on the 3d of Sep- 
tember, 1865, and is a representative of a well-known pioneer family of 



784 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

this section of the state. The doctor is a son of Louis V. and Mary Jane 
(Carter) Wiseman, the former of whom was born in Monroe County, 
West Virginia, in 1826, and the latter of whom was born near Gallipolis, 
the county seat of Gallia County, Ohio, in 1832, her parents having been 
early settlers of that county. Louis F. Wiseman devoted the greater part 
of his active career to the basie industry of agriculture and was long 
numbered among the prosperous and honored representatives of this line 
of enterprise in Lawrence County, where his death occurred in the year 
1896. His was the distinction of having represented the Buckeye state 
as a gallant soldier in the Civil War, in which he served two years and 
ten months as a member of Company D, Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer 
Infantry, in which he became sergeant of his company. In later years he 
was an appreciative and popular member of that noble patriotic organ- 
ization, the Grand Army of the Republic, the ranks of which are being 
rapidly thinned by the one implacable adversary, death. Mrs. Wiseman 
survived her honored husband and passed forward to the "land of the 
leal" in 1905. Of the eleven children, Henry J. is the eldest and is a 
resident of Lawrence County ; Sarah and Mary are deceased ; Louis A. 
maintains his home in Lawrence County ; Sarepta is the wife of Dr. 
William Griffith, of Pedro, this county; William W. is a resident of 
Sherritts; Ruth J. likewise remains at Sherritts; Dr. John S., of this 
review, was the next in order of birth; Susan A. lives at Sherritts; Mar- 
tha is deceased; and Thomas F. is a representative farmer in the vicin- 
ity of Sherritts. 

Dr. John S. Wiseman was )-eared to the sturdy and invigorating dis- 
cipline of the home farm and continued to 1>e actively identified with 
agricultural pursuits until he had attained to the age of twenty-three 
years. In the meanwhile he fully availed himself of the advantages of 
the public schools of his native county, and his ambition led him to 
formulate definite plans for a broader career of usefulness than that of 
the prosaic but sterling work of farming. In consonance with his ambi- 
tion he entered the Miami Medical College, in the city of Cincinnati, 
and in this excellent institution he was graduated as a member of the 
class of 1898 and with the well-earned degree of doctor of medicine. 
For the first six years of his active professional work Dr. AYiseinan main- 
tained his residence at Powellsville, Scioto County, and he then removed 
to Beaver, Pike County, where he continued in successful practice until 
1907. He then returned to his native county and established his liome 
in the city of Ironton, where he has built up a large and representative 
general practice and has secure status as one of the leading physicians 
and surgeons of Lawrence County. The doctor has availed himself of 
the best of the standard and periodical literature of his profession nnd 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 785 

in addition to being a close and ambitious student through this medium 
he has also taken effective post-graduate course in the New York Poly- 
clinic, in 1898-9, and in the Chicago Polyclinic, in 1907. Dr. Wiseman 
is actively identified with the Lawrence County Medical Society, the 
Ohio State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He 
is a member of the Ironton Chamber of Commerce, is steadfast in his 
allegiance to the cause of the republican party, whose basic principles 
he believes best adapted for the safe government of the nation, but in 
local affairs lie is not constrained within strict partisan lines. While 
a resident of Beaver, Pike County, he served three years as president of 
its board of education. The doctor is affiliated with the Masonic frater- 
nity and the Knights of Pythias, and he holds membership in the First 
Baptist church of Ironton, of which his wife, now deceased, likewise was 
a devoted adherent. 

On the 24th of October, 1888, was solemnized the marriage of Dr. 
Wiseman to Miss Sadie Stuart, daughter of the late Calvin M. Stuart, a 
prominent farmer of Symmes Township, Lawrence County, and she was 
summoned to the life eternal on the 18th of August, 1912, secure in the 
affectionate regard of all who had come within the compass of her 
gracious influence. Dr. and INIrs. Wiseman became the parents of five 
children, of whom the first. Alma, and the third, Clayton L., are de- 
ceased. Those who survive the devoted mother are Lucille F., Avanelle 
P. and Marcelle E. 

Henry Hunter. The people of Ironton, Ohio, are indebted to Henry 
Hunter for the opportunity he has placed in their way o^ enjoying high- 
class amusement features. It has been said, and truly, that not least 
among the tasks allotted to men's lives are those which minister to our 
esthetic natures, and the successful theatrical manager is he who places 
before the patrons of the stage alike the humorous and the pathetic 
aspects of life. While Mr. Hunter is still a young man, he is experienced 
in the amusement business, is a veteran of the motion picture industry 
in Ohio, and as manager and part owner of the Empire 'and Scenic 
Theatres is giving the people clean, interesting and instructive ex- 
hibitions. 

Mr. Hunter was born in Wayne County, West Virginia, September 
3, 1878, and is a son of Peter F. and Amelia (DelMaro) Hunter. His 
father, who was bom in Staunton, Virginia, in 1849. served as a mem- 
ber of Company K, Fifty-third Mounted Kentucky Infantry, during 
the Civil war, and is now a resident of Ironton, where he is engaged in 
business as a contracting carpenter. Mrs. Hunter was bom in Lawrence 
County, Ohio, in 1858, and has been the mother of six children : Henry, 



786 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

John A., Samuel V., Charles A., James B. and May F. Henry Hunter 
attended the public schools of West Virginia, Kentucky and Ohio until 
he was sixteen years of age, and at that time took up the study of engi- 
neering, to which he applied himself for two years. He then entered 
the employ of the Lawrence Telephone Company as a lineman and 
remained with that firm for seven years, being advanced to the position 
of wire chief and later was made manager. With C. B. Clark, he 
became in 1905, one of the pioneers in the motion picture business in 
Ohio. He has continued in this business, steadily increasing his inter- 
ests, and at this time is part owner of two of the most successful amuse- 
ment enterprises of the city, the Scenic and Empire Theaters, which, 
under his management, are attracting large and appreciative audiences. 
During the early days of moving pictures, one of the most dangerous 
features of the business lay in the liability of the films catching fire. 
Mr. Hunter, a natural mechanic, devised an attachment which did 
away with this danger, and for some time it was extensively used in 
various parts of the country, but has since been displaced by more 
recent inventions along the same line. Mr. Hunter has a most creditable 
military record, having been a member of the Seventh Regiment, Ohio 
National Guard, for nine years, and serving with Company I, Seventh 
Regiment. Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Spanish- American war. 
He is a great lover of motor-boating, promoting events of this character, 
and owning the largest motor boat on the river at Ironton. He owns 
his own residence at No. 69 North Sixth Street, and has a number of 
other interests. Fraternally he is connected with the local lodges of 
the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of 
Elks. ^Ir. Hunter is a republican and a consistent member of the 
Episcopal Church, with which the members of his family are also 
connected. 

On August 24, 1902, Mr. Hunter was married at Ironton to Miss 
Anna M. Lewis, daughter of Louis Lewis, who is employed at the roll- 
ing mills at Ironton. Five children have been born to this union, 
namely : Helena, Ruth, Alden F., Henrietta and Beatrice J. 

Joiix H. Lucas. A native son of Ironton, Lawrence County, and a 
representative of one of the sterling pioneer families of this now thriv- 
ing industrial city, Mr. Lucas is the sole owner of the large and rep- 
resentative retail drug business conducted under the title of the Lucas 
Drug Company, with a large and admirably equipped establishment. 
Mr. Lucas became virtually dependent upon his own resources when he 
was a mere boy and through his ability and well-ordered effotts he has 
;;chieved distinctive success and gained secure vantage ground as one 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 787 

of the representative business men and influential citizens of his native 
city and county, where his friends are in number as his acquaintances. 
He is one of the most progressive and liberal of the admirable coterie 
of men who have been potent in furthering and maintaining the civic and 
material prosperity of Ironton. The significant colloquial term 
"Booster" applies to him most effectively in all that touches the inter- 
ests of his native city, to which liis loyalty is unwavering and marked 
by deep appreciation. 

John H. Lucas was born at Ironton on the 25th of October, 1858, 
and is the youngest in a family of five children, the others being: 
William, Clara, Ludwig and Carrie. Mr. Lucas is a son of John H. and 
Luvina (Schachleiter) Lucas, the former of whom was born at Wald- 
heim, in the Kingdom of Saxony, Germany, in 1836, and the latter of 
whom was born near the city of Berlin, Germany, in 1838. John H. 
Lucas came to America when a youth and in 1852 he established him- 
self as a pioneer of Ironton, where he engaged in the work of his trade, 
that of baker, incidentall}^ erecting the first bakery in the city. He died 
in 1861, when but twenty-five years of age, and his widow survived 
him by more than two score years, she having been summoned to the 
life eternal in 1909. 

The public schools of Ironton afforded to John H. Lucas his early 
educational advantages, which were limited, as he began to learn the 
lessons of practical industry when a mere boy and thus depended upon 
self-application and experience in later years to supplement and round 
out his education, this training having made him a man of broad views 
and mature judgment. At the age of twelve years Mr. Lucas became 
errand boy for a local drug store, and that he availed himself fully of 
the technical advantages afforded him in connection with this line of 
enterprise is shown by the fact that he studied and worked until he had 
qualified himself thoroughly as a pharmacist. He became prescription 
clerk and served in this capacity until 1880, when he went to Proctor- 
ville, Lawrence County, in which village he established a drug store 
and engaged in business on his own responsibility. In 1889 he sold 
the stock and business and returned to Ironton, where he became clerk 
in the drug store conducted by Drs. Gray and Robinson. In 1893 he 
became associated with his employers in founding the Lucas Drug Com- 
pany, and in 1897 he purchased the interests of his partners, since 
which time he has continued the business in an individual way and 
under the original title. His establishment is essentially metropolitan 
in its equipment and facilities and in addition to handling drugs, med- 
icines, toilet articles, sundries, etc., he has a well-stocked department 
devoted to paints, oils, window glass, etc. The establishment has long 



788 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

controlled a substantial and representative trade, based upon fair and 
honorable dealings and effective service, the while the success of the 
business has been heightened by the personal popularity of the pro- 
prietor. 

In addition to his drug business Mr. Lucas has been concerned with 
the development and upbuilding of other important enterprises in his 
native city and county. He is vice-president of the Home Telephone 
Company and a director of the Iron City Savings Bank, besides wliich 
he has made judicious investments in local real estate and has aided 
in the physical upbuilding as well as the social and material progress 
of Ironton. His influence and co-operation have been given in support 
of measures and enterprises tending to advance the best interests of his 
home city, where he served for some time as president of the Busi- 
ness Men's Association and where he is now vice-president of the Iron- 
ton Chamber of Commerce. Mr. Lucas is found arrayed as a loyal 
supporter of the cause of the republican party, his allegiance to which 
he has found no reason to sever in the face of modern disaffection in 
its ranks. In the Masonic fraternity he has received the ultimate or 
chivalric degrees, and is affiliated with the Ironton connnandery of 
Knights Templar, as well as the Ancient Arabic Order-' of the Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine and the local lodge of the Benevolent and Pi'o- 
tective Order of Elks. 

In 1884 Mr. Lucas wedded Miss Ola B. Carter, who passed to eternal 
rest in 1887, and who is survived by one son, Emerson, who resides in 
Washington, D. C, and holds a responsible position with the Southern 
Railway Company; he married Miss Margurta iMay Jury, of Louisville, 
Kentucky. On the 27th of Decejnber, 1891, was solemnized the mar- 
riage of Mr. Lucas to Miss Florence T. Turby, daughter of William W. 
and Henrietta Turby, of Ironton, and the five children of this union 
are: John H., Jr., William T., Gray, Richard and Paul. John 11. 
Lucas, Jr., is manager of the business of the Texas Oil Company in tlie 
city of Birmingham, Alabama; William T. is a student of electrical 
engineering in the Western Reserve University, in the city of Clevohuid ; 
and the other children remain at the parental home. 

John R. C. Brov^n. Few of the public officials of the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region of Ohio have had a longer or more lionorable service 
than the city engineer of Ironton, John R. C. Brown. A resident of 
this place since 1870, he has held his present office since that yt-ai-, 
with the exception of three years, and his conscientious devotion to 
duty, his ability in his chosen calling and his commendable acliieve- 
ments have given him the right to be numbered among tlie men who 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 789 

have contributed to the upbuilding and development of this prosperous 
section of the Buckeye st;ate. 

John R. C. Brown was bom in Clermont County, Ohio. August 14, 
1835, and is a son of Isaac H. and Katherine (Rogers) Brown. His 
father, born in Clermont County, Ohio, in 1809, was in early life a 
carpenter, but later became a farmer and so continued to be engaged 
until his death, in 1887. A stanch supporter of the Union, he early 
became an abolitionist, and was outspoken in his views upon the ques- 
tion of slavery. Mi-s. Brown was bom in Kentucky, in 1806. and died 
in 1889, having been the mother of eight children, namely : Elizabeth 
C, John R. C, Sue E., Dr. Isaac N.. William T., Dr. Quincy A., Pcr- 
melia and Fannie, of whom John R. C, Permelia and Fannie survive. 

The country schools of Clermont County and a local institution of 
Brown County, Ohio, furnished John R. C. Brown with his educational 
training, although since leaving school, in his eighteenth year, he has 
been a student upon various subjects and has gained a wide range of 
knowledge. He first adopted teaching as a profession, but in 1863 was 
elected county surveyor of Brown County, a position which he held for 
three years, during which time he had charge of the building and up- 
keep of fifty miles of highway out of Georgetown. Mr. Brown came to 
Ironton in 1870, and here his abilities so impressed the people that he 
was made assistant city engineer under Thomas Gore. One year later 
he succeeded Mr. Gore as city engineer. From 1874 until 1887 he was 
both county surveyor and city engineer, and in 1899 ]\Ir. Fred G. Leete 
was elected to that office and held it three years. In 1902 Mr. Bi-ouu 
was again sent to the office, and has continued to act therein to the 
present time. His accomplishments have included the building of all 
the streets and sewers in Ironton, and the manner in which lie has eon- 
ducted the affairs of his office has met wdth the entire approval of the 
people, who have expressed their appreciation of his services on luimer- 
ous occasions. 

Mr. Brown was married September 20, 1856. at tlie home of tlie bride 
in Brown County, to Miss Elizabeth A. Carpenter, who was boi-n Jan- 
uary 16, 1836, a daughter of Simon and ^lary Carpenter, farming 
people of Brown County. Mrs. Brown died IMay 26, 1911, having lieeii 
the mother of four children: Christopher N.. who died in 1902, as 
dean of the Ohio State ITnivei*sity and professor of civil engineering: 
Mary C, who died in infancy; Sarah; C,, avIio died in tlie 16th year 
of her age; and John Q., mechanical engineer and electrician and 
superintendent of the Consolidated Street Railway ('ompany, at Oak- 
land, California, married Helen Gager, and has two children, Ann and 
John Q., Jr. Mr. Brown is a consistent member of the First Congre- 



790 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

gatioiial church. A republican in political matters, his present office 
has been his only public position. He has interested himself in various 
business ventures at different times, and is now a stockholder in the 
Home Building & Loan Association and the Crescent Building & Loan 
Association. His home on Fourth Street is a modern one, and there 
he also owns five acres of land. A steady, dependable official and public- 
spirited citizen, he continues to be, as in the past, one of Ironton's most 
helpful men. 

William J. Maiioney. As one of the able and representative mem- 
bers of the bar of Lawrence County, Ohio, Mr. Mahoney is entitled to 
specific recognition in this history, as he is also by reason of his status 
as a broad-minded, loyal and public-spirited citizen of sterling character 
and high ideals. He is engaged in the successful practice of his pro- 
fession in the City of Ironton, the judicial center of Lawrence Covmty, 
and his clientage indicates in its personnel and importance the popular 
estimate placed upon his ability as a resourceful ad^'Ocate and well forti- 
fied counselor. 

Mr. jMahoney claims the fair old Emerald Isle as the place of his 
nativity, and in both the agnatic and maternal lines he is a scion of the 
stanchest of Irish stock. He was born in County Wexford, Ireland, on 
the 14th of June, 1862, and is a son of Patrick and Elizabeth Mahoney, 
the former of whom was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, in 1834, 
and the latter County Wexford, Ireland, in 1839. Patrick Mahoney 
served as a captain in the British army during his lifetime, and was 
district inspector of Irish troops and police for the Province of Leinster, 
where his death occurred in 1894. The mother of him whose name ini- 
tiates this review was summoned to the life eternal in 1868, when he 
was a lad of about six years. Of the children William; J. is the elder of 
the two now living, his brother Thomas when at home being a resident 
of Dublin, Ireland, being now in the diplomatic service of the British 
government. Three children are deceased, two sons and one daughter. 

In a private school in his native land William J. Mahoney acquired 
his early educational discipline, and he there also attended the prepara- 
tory department of a college. At the age of ten years he came to the 
United States, and settlement was made at Center Station, Lawrence 
County, Ohio, where he spent two years, and was reared to adult age in 
Ironton, Ohio, being there afforded the advantages of the public schools. 
He made good use of his scholastic privileges, and for two and one-half 
years was numbered among the successful teachers of the district schools, 
besides which he worked in various iron furnaces in the States of Vir- 
ginia and Tennessee, having charge of iron plants as manager and in 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 791 

other capacities. His ambition led him to form definite plans i'or his 
future career, and after deciding to adopt tlie legal profession he entered 
tlie law department of Washington University at Lexington, Virginia, in 
which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1898 and from which 
he received his degree of Bachelor of Laws. Since the time of his grad- 
uation Mr. Mahoney has been engaged as a teacher and instructor in 
law and has practiced his profession for varying intervals in Virginia, 
Washington, Ohio and other states. He has been one of the leading rep- 
resentatives of his profession in Lawrence County, Ohio, since 1908. 
He controls a large and important law business and has appeared in 
connection with much notable litigation in the various courts of this 
section of Ohio, Kentucky and West Virginia. Mr. Mahoney is inde- 
pendent in his political opinions. He is well fortified in his conviction 
concerning economic measures and govei'nment policies, as he is a close 
student of the questions and issues of the hour, as well as of the best in 
general literature, including that of his profession. 

In the year 1885 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Mahoney to 
Miss Ella Scherer, who was born in Ironton, Ohio, April 14, 1862, a 
daughter of ^lichael Scherer, a pioneer in Ironton business circles. Mr. 
and Mrs. Mahoney have two children, Elizabeth and John L. The 
daughter is now the wife of Henry Horsehel, of Ironton, and they have 
one son, AVilliam E. M., their daughter, Henrietta, having died in child- 
hood. John L. Mahoney is unmarried and resides in Oklahoma. 

Fred Frecka. There is something to 1)e found of a nature more 
than ordinarily interesting ■ in the career of one who has won his own 
way in the world and who in spite of handicaps and difficulties has 
attained the goal of success which he has set before him. Such a man 
is Fred Frecka, well known as a plumber and also favorably known to 
the citizens of Ironton as the former capable superintendent of tlie water 
works. In almost every respect he is self-made and self-educated, and 
the services he rendered his community in his official capacity were 
such as to entitle him to a place among the builders of Lawrence County's 
most thriving city. Mr. Frecka was born at Ironton, Ohio, April 5, 
1873, and is a son of Henry and Kathryn (Brinkman) Frecka. 

Henry Frecka was born in Germany in 1838, and like many of his 
ambitious fellow-countrymen decided that a more promising futui;' 
awaited him across the water. Accordingly, at the age of tweiit,\-two 
years, he emigrated to the United States and soon s;4tled at 1 ronton. 
where he became the proprietor of a flourishing ice business and thiough 
industry and integrity made a place for himself among his adopted 
citv's substantial men. He took a keen interest in civic affairs, and 



792 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

during the two terms that he served as councilman was instrumental in 
the making of beneficial laws. His death occurred in 1908. Mrs. 
Frecka, who was also born in Germany in 1838, survives her husband 
and makes her home at Ironton. There were ten children in the family : 
Kathryn, Minnie, Charles, Tillie, Henry, Fred, Louis, Mary and two 
who died in infancy. 

Fred Freeka attended the public schools of Ironton until reaching 
the age of fourteen years, and during this time displayed his indus- 
trious and energetic nature by working on the ice M-agon for his father. 
He then became apprenticed to the trade of plumber, and after working 
at this vacation under Pete Constable for four years opened a store of 
his own, continuing to conduct this establishment until 1912. He 
gained during this time a reputation for skilled workmanship and fidelity 
to engagements which gained for him, in 1912, the appointment to the 
office of superintendent of the water works, a position in which he emi- 
nently proved his ability and his high value to the city. During his 
incumbency Mr. Freeka improved the water service in various ways, 
relaying a great deal of old and small pipe with larger lines, and thus 
greatly increasing the supply. His conscientious and energetic efforts 
met with the approval of the people, 'and no city official was held in 
higher general esteem. A republican in politics, Mr. Freeka has been 
active in the ranks of his party, and has served as councilman of Ironton 
sijioe 1908. He is a member of tlie Modern AVoodmen of America, and 
his religious connection is with the German Reformed Church. 

.Mr. Freeka was married February 8, 1891, at the home of the bride, 
to ]\Iiss Mary C. ^lassie, daughter of Isaac and Philona Massie, of Greasy 
Ridge, Lawrence County. Four childi'en have been born to this union, 
of whom two survive: Hazel G., who is a popular school teacher of 
Ironton; and Chauncy M., who is still attending school. The pleasant 
family home is located at 249 South Third Street. 

Eugene B. Willard. Probably no one individual through his own 
career and through the activities of his family has had more intimate 
relations with the general industrial and commercial life of the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region than p]ugene B. Willard of Ironton. As Mr. Willard 
is associated with the "History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region" in the 
capacity of editor, the publishers desire to take this opportunity to insert 
in the biographical section a sketch of Mr. Willard and his interesting 
family. 

Eugene P). Willard is a native of the Hanging Rock Iron Region, and 
Avas born at Pine Creek Landing, Scioto County, Ohio, September 23, 
1842. His is one of the oldest American families represented now in 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 793 

Southern Ohio. 1. Simon Willard, the first American ancestor, was born 
in the Parish of Horsmonden, County of Kent^ England, in 1605, bap- 
tized April 5, ]605, a son of Richard AVillard, and came to America in 
April, 1634, landing at Boston. He was a member of the General Court, 
surveyor of arms, representative, major of militia County of Middlesex, 
and had many years of active service against the Indians. He died 
April 24, 1676. Simon Willard married, first, JMary Sharpe, daughter 
of Henry and Jane Sharpe in England ; second, Elizabeth Dunster, sister 
of Rev. Henry Dunster, a president of Harvard College; third, Mary 
Dunster, who died at Sudbury in December, 1715. 2. Josiah, who died 
at Weathersfield, Massachusetts, in 1674, married March 20, 1656-57, 
Hannah Hosmer. 3. Samuel, born September 19, 1658, married Sarah 
Clarke June 6, 1683, died at Saybrook, Massachusetts, in 1713-14. 
4. Joseph, born at Saybrook, graduated at Yale College, 1714, married 
Susanna Lynde, was preacher at Sunderland, then at Rutland, and was 
killed by Indians August 23, 1723, after a struggle in which he had 
killed one Indians and wounded another. 5. Joseph, second son of Rev. 
Joseph and Susanna, married Huldah Willard, who was daughter of 
Lieut. Moses AVillard, who was killed by Indians June 18, 1756, near 
Charlestown, New Hampshire. 6. Francis Willoughby Willard, married 
Deborah Blood December 3, 1772. 7. James, born in Charlestown, New 
Hampshire, and died in 1851, married Lydia, daughter of Jonathan and 
Catherine Willard of Langdon, New Hampshire. 8. James Orville, born 
at Charlestown, New Hampshire, July 7, 1814, removed to Painesville, 
Ohio, in November, 1834, married Anna M. Seeley in 1839, and died at 
Ironton, Ohio, May 19, 1855. 9. Eugene B. Willard, born as above 
stated September 23, 1842. 

James 0. Willard, the father, was educated at Plainfield, New Hamp- 
shire, was reared on a farm until twenty, then became clerk at a furnace, 
and then furnace owner and manager in the Hanging Rock Region in 
1840. He was the first president of the Iron Railroad in 1850, and then 
cashier of the Iron Bank of Ironton. He was a Congregationalist and a 
whig in politics. His wife, Anna M. Seeley, was born at Easton, Con- 
necticut, was brought by her father to Painesville, Ohio, in 1814, was 
educated there in the public schools and in a seminary at New Haven, 
Connecticut, and she died at Ironton June 17, 1873. Her father was 
Uri Seeley, Avho was a son of Ebenezer Seeley, who was son of Nathaniel 
Seeley, son of Nathaniel Seeley, all of Connecticut. 

Eugene B. Willard when nine years of age was brought to Ironton, 
Ohio, in October, 1851, and acciuired his early education in the public 
schools of that city. In September, 1859, he entered the freshman class 
of Marietta College, Ohio, left there in May, 1861, because his mother, 



794 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

who was then a widow, was afraid he would enlist in the army. He was 
the only son, and for a time he yielded to his mother's wishes that he 
should remain at home. During the winter of 1861-62 he taught school, 
and wrote in the office of the county auditor at Ironton until President 
Lincoln called for "600,000 more" ih July, 1862. August 15, 1862, he 
enlisted in Company H, Ninety-first Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
served in West Virginia and in the Shenandoah Valley, was under Gen- 
erals Hayes, Crook and Sheridan, was wounded in battle July 20, 1864, 
near Winchester, was promoted to second lieutenant in Januarj', 1865, 
and mustered out with the regiment June 30, 1865. He saw compara- 
tively little fighting during the first two years, since the regiment was 
engaged in scouting and garrison duty in the mountains of West Vir- 
ginia. The last year was one of heavy campaigning in Virginia. At the 
beginning of the engagement on the afternoon of July 20, 1864, near 
Winchester, Company H had forty-seven men present for duty, and of 
these eleven were killed or mortally wounded, and fourteen wounded. 
The company during its entire term of service lost but one man by 
disease, and twelve killed in battle. 

In October, 1865, a few months after his return from the war, ]\Ir. 
Willard became clerk at the B'uckhorn furnace in Lawrence County. In 
August, 1866, he went to the Ohio furnace in Sioto County, owned by 
Means, Kyle & Company, to serve as clerk. This company was owner of 
the Ohio and Pine Grove furnaces and the Hanging Rock coal works, 
and at that time was the strongest and most progressive company in the 
business of making charcoal iron in the Hanging Rock Region. In May, 
1868, Mr. Willard entered the general offices of Means, Kyle & Company 
at Hanging Rock as general bookkeeper and cashier, remained with the 
company as cashier, general manager and president by successive promo- 
tions until October, 1902. It was this company that built the Hamilton 
coke furnace at Hanging Rock in 1884-85, and thereafter the manufac- 
ture of coke pig-iron was its pricipal business. After nearly forty years 
of active connection with the furnaces and related industries of this 
region Mr. Willard resigned and ceased active business in 1902. 

While always a republican, Mr. Willard has usually belonged to the 
rank and file of the party. His only offices have been township or 
school board positions. However, he was chairman of the commission 
which built the Lawrence County courthouse. Mr. Willard has been a 
member of the Presbyterian Church since 1866, and an elder for more 
than thirty years. 

On July 23, 1868, at Ironton, Ohio, Eugene B. Willard tind Alice 
Valentine were united in marriage. Alice was born at Cincinnati, Ohio, 
March 8, 1844, and died at Ironton, October 25, 1910. She af f ended the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 795 

public schools of Ironton until September, 1862, and then entered Gran- 
ville Female College at Granville, Ohio, from which she graduated in 
June, 1865. Her father, John Valentine, was a mechanical engineer and 
lost his life in 1852 at New Orleans, Louisiana, while engaged in erecting 
sugar machinery for Miles Greenwood & Company of Cincinnati. Her 
mother, Phebe Walton, was born and reared near Chester, Pennsylvania, 
of Quaker stock, but came to Ohio about 1830, and died at Hanging Rock 
in October, 1895. 

AVith all the work and accomplishments of a long life ^Ir. Willard 
may be pardoned for finding his highest satisfaction in the group of 
children who have grown up in his home, to each of whom he has been 
able to afford a collegiate education, and who already do honor to their 
parents by the worthy stations they have found in life. His children, 
all born at Hanging Rock, briefly mentioned, are : Mary, born January 
23, 1870; James Orville, born December 15, 1872; Eugene B., born 
October 19, 1874 ; Alfred S., born August 29, 1879 ; Anna, born June 25, 
1881 ; Alice, born January 30, 1883 ; and Ruth, born June 1, 1888. .Alary 
Willard attended the public schools of Hanging Rock, afterwards spent 
three years at the Granville Female College, where she graduated in June, 
1890, and on October 16, 1895, married Edward L. Lambert, and they 
now live at Ironton, parents of four children, three girls and one boy. 
James Orville was graduated from the Pennsylvania Alilitary College at 
Chester in June, 1894, as a civil engineer, entered the employ of the 
Carnegie Steel Company the same year, remained in its service seven 
years, then entered the employ of Jon^s & Laughlin Steel Company of 
Pittsburg as engineer in charge of construction at their Eliza furnace 
plant, and is still with that company in charge of the six Eliza blast 
furnaces ; he is unmarried. Eugene B., Jr., attended the Hanging Rock 
public schools until the age of fifteen, then entered the Pennsylvania 
Military College at Chester, graduating a civil engineer in June. 1804, 
became assistant manager at Hamilton furnace, Hanging Rock, for two 
years, following which he spent two years at the Case School of Applied 
Science in Cleveland, and then took charge of Hamilton furnace as 
manager. In 1900 he went to the Iroquois furnace at Chicago, remained 
there until 1902, then took the management of the furnaces at AVellston, 
Ohio, remained there until 1906, and then took charge of the Eliza fur- 
naces at Pittsburg. On May 21, 1907, he with five other men was in- 
stantly killed by an explosion at the Eliza furnaces; he was unmarried. 
Alfred S., after attending the Hanging Rock public schools until June, 
1896, spent two years in the Pennsylvania Military College, nearly two 
years at the Case School of Applied Science in Cleveland, taking a 
course as mechanical engineer, served his time as machinist in the Norfolk 



796 HANGING ROCK lEON REGION 

& Western Railroad shops at Portsmouth, and has continued in the 
employ of that railroad as machinist, foreman and general foreman of 
shops to this time, having been general foreman of the shops at William- 
son, West Virginia, for the past three years; he married Ethel Mills 
of Cleveland, Ohio, October 16, 1905, and has two children. The daugh- 
ter Anna attended the public schools at Hanging Rock until June, 1897, 
followed by two years at Lake Erie College at Painesville, Ohio, then four 
years in the Western College for Women at Oxford, Ohio, graduating in 
June, 1903 ; at Ironton, June 5, 1907, she married Osbert E. Irish, a law- 
yer, and has two sons and one daughter. The daughter Alice attended 
public schools at Hanging Rock until June, 1899, entered the Western 
College for AVomen at Oxford, Ohio, in September of that year, was 
graduated in June, 1905, and is yet unmarried. Ruth after her gradua- 
tion from the Ironton High School in June, 1907, spent four years in 
the study of music at Oberlin, Ohio, is unmarried, and is now organist at 
the Presbyterian Church of Ironton. 

Daniel Webster Williams. As editor of that portion of tlie "His- 
tory of the Hanging Rock Iron Region" pertaining to Jackson County, 
the publishers desire herewith to present a brief sketch of the career of 
Daniel Webster Williams, whose many years spent in Jackson County 
liave been accompanied with valuable service as newspaper man, author, 
and a leader in public affairs. 

Daniel Webster Williams was born October 31, 1862, at Banner, 
Jackson County, Ohio. The Williams family is of Welsh origin. His 
great-grandfather, David Rees Williams, was a Welshman, but married 
Celia Lyon, who was of Irish family, and a sister of Matthew Lyon, who 
was for two terms a congressman from Vermont, represented a district in 
Kentucky in Congress four terms, and was the first delegate from the 
Territory of Arkansas. The Lyon family were natives of Wicklow 
County, Ireland. 

George David Williams, grandfather of the Jackson editor, was born 
February 11, 1785, and died December 30, 1871. He was the founder 
of the Williams name in Southern Ohio. He was a freeholder at Lled- 
rod, Wales, and in 1839 emigrated to America and settled on a farm in 
(ireenfield Township, Gallia County, Ohio. There he assisted to organ- 
ize Sardis Church, Calvinistic ]\Iethodist. He married Hannah Lewis 
of Aberaeron, Wales, a descendant of a Huguenot who had tied from 
France in a coasting vessel at the time of the St. Bartholomew massacre, 
and settled in Wales. Hannah Lewis died March 22, 1870. 

Benjamin G. Williams, father of Daniel W., was born in Wales, emi- 
grated with his parents and spent the rest of his life in Ohio. He was 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 797 

a fanner, first in Gallia County, and then near Banner, in Jackson 
County. He was born March 2, 1821, and died January 8, 1912. By 
two wives he was the father of seventeen children. His second wife, 
the mother of Daniel W., was Margaret Evans, who was born in Jackson 
County, Ohio, :\Iareh 18, 1839, and died February 9, 1908. 

Daniel W. AVilliams was educated in the common schools and in the 
Ohio University, leaving college in his junior year. After some expe- 
rience in other lines he took up newspaper work July 15, 1889, and that 
has been his vocation ever since, except during the period from April, 
1905, to June, 1907, when he served as consul at Cardiff, Wales. As 
consul he wrote many exhaustive reports to the American Government. 
He resigned that post in the consular service to return home and care 
for his mother during her last days. Mr. Williams was given the honor- 
ary degree of A. M. by Ohio University in 1904. Besides his contribu- 
tions to the current newspapers, Mr. Williams is author of a history of 
Scioto Salt Licks in Jackson County ; and edits the Standard Journal, a 
weekly regarded as a unicjue contribution to journalistic technic. His 
"Day by Day" notes on varied subjects, politics, personalities, philos- 
ophy, humor, etc., have been widely quoted. 

On the republican ticket Mr. Williams was elected in 1908 as senator 
from the Seventh Oliio District, and served one term. In that time he 
was cliairman of the committee on mines, and introduced the present 
milling code for Ohio. He was also chairman of the Ohio food probe 
committee of 1910, the first to publish a report on that subject in this 
country. In 1914 ^Ir. Williams was candidate on the progressive ticket 
for lieutenant governor of Ohio. He has long been active in the Pres- 
byterian Church, having served as elder, Sunday school superintendent, 
trustee and in other relations with his home church, and as president of 
the Jackson County Sunday School Association several terms. In col- 
lege Mr. Williams was a Delta Tau Delta, and is affiliated with the Im- 
proved Order of Red Men. In his home community he has performed 
a number of civic services, and was a library trustee of Jackson. 

January 6, 1887, Mr. Williams married Sarah Marshall Ames at 
]\Iacon, Mississippi. Mrs. Williams is of a notable Southern family. She 
received her education at Macon, Mississippi, and in the Ohio Univer- 
sity. Her parents were Charles Bingley and Sarah Jane (Longstreet"> 
Ames. Her ancestor, Sylvanus Ames, died while with the American 
army at Valley Forge. Her father was a soldier in the Confederate 
army, and held many positions of honor in Noxubee County, Mississippi, 
including those of probate judge, superintendent of education, etc. ]\Irs. 
Williams' mother was the youngest sister of Gen. James Longstreet, one 
of the ablest leaders of the Confederacv. Of the children born to ]\Ir. 



798 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

and Mrs. Williams, two, Maude and Chilton, died in infancy. Ben 
Ames Williams, who was born at Macon, Mississippi, ^lareh 7, 1889, 
graduated from Dartmouth College in 1910, and since that year has been 
employed on the Boston American, and on September 4, 1912, at York 
Harbor, Maine, married Florence Talpy ; Helen Ames Williams, born at 
Jackson, Ohio, July 20, 1893, was graduated at Glendale College, Ohio, 
in 1913. 

Mrs. Henry Winter. Substantial industry, honest dealing with 
all his fellowmen, and quiet but unostentatious success w^re the char- 
acteristics of the late Henry Winter, who died at Ironton in 1905, and 
whose widow, Mrs. Katharine Winter, now continues to reside in that 
city and is one of the women prominent both in business and .social 
affairs. 

Henry Winter was born at Pomeroy, Ohio, in 1853, spent most of 
his life in the Hanging Rock Iron Region, and was for a number of years 
an iron puddler. After the iron industry declined he opened a grocery 
store, and built up a good business and eventually was rated as one of 
the very successful and prosperous men of Ironton. He had along 
with first class business ability the characteristics of charity and gener- 
osity, and did a great deal for less fortunate people that has never come 
to the knowledge of the world. 

Mrs. Katharine Winter was born at Buena Vista, now Princess, 
Kentucky, a daughter of Joseph and Rosa (Bahn) Palter. Her father 
was born in Germany in 1820, came to Kentucky in young manhood, 
and subsequently was one of the early settlers of Lawrence County, 
Ohio, where he died in 1885. His wife was born in Germany about 
1823. Mrs. Winter came to Ironton when about eight months of age, 
was reared and educated in the city, and has known the people of the 
community and been interested in its affairs for many years. On June 
9, 1885, she married Mr. Winter, and since his death has shown unusual 
business capacity in looking after the estate. To their marriage were 
born three children: Bertha M., Frances R. and Henry, Jr. Bertha, 
who graduated at St. Aloysius Academy in New Lexington, Perry 
County, Ohio, in 1906, is now living in Ironton and is organist at St. 
Joseph's Church. Frances is also a graduate of the same academy in 
1907. Henry, Jr., is a graduate of St. I\Iary's College at Dayton, Ohio, 
in 1912, and is now clerk with a large coal company in the mining 
district of West Virginia. 

Mrs. Winter is a member of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, of the 
Christian Mothers Society and does much practical charity both in and 
out of the church. She is a stockholder in the First National Barik, in 




HENRY WINTER 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 799 

the Ironton Lumber Company, the Ironton Engine Plant and several 
other local companies. Besides her beautiful residence at 135 S. 
Third Street she is the owner of a good deal of real estate in and out 
of the city. 

John Peebles. A man of indefatigable enterprise and marked fer- 
tility of resource, John Peebles, of Portsmouth, has long been identi- 
fied Avith the advancement of the commercial and industrial interests of 
this part of Scioto County, and as the result of his ability and efficient 
management has not only achieved distinction in business circles, but 
has gained a comfortable fortune. He was born at Pine Grove Furnace, 
Lawrence County, Ohio, a son of John Geddes and Martha (Steele) 
Peebles, of whom an extended history may be found on another page of 
this l)iographical work. 

After leaving the public schools, John Peebles attended Sewickley 
Academy, in Sewickley, Pennsylvania, and the State Normal School at 
Lebanon, Ohio. Entering then the employ of Johnson, Peebles & Co., 
he was a clerk in the office of their hub and spoke factory until 187o, 
when, in partnership with Joseph G. Reed, he embarked in the whole- 
sale dry goods business, which he continued for a quarter of a century. 
He then disposed of his interest in the firm in order to devote his entire 
time and energies to his fatlier's business affairs, which were numerous, 
and of much importance. In 1902 Mr. Peebles, with characteristic enter- 
prise and foresight, organized the Peebles Paving Brick Company, of 
which he has since been president. The Peebles family still retain the 
interest of John G. Peebles in the iron business, and Mr. John Peebles 
is director and vice president of the Bellefontaine Iron Works Company 
and of the Ashland Iron and Mining Company. He also served as pres- 
ident of the Portsmouth National Bank from the time of his father's 
death until that institution was consolidated with the First National 
Bank of Portsmouth. 

]\Ir. Peebles was first married in 1870 to Sarah Lynn Tewksbury, 
who was born at Wheelersburg, Scioto County, a daughter of Moor 
Russell and Sarah (Lynn) Tewksbury, and a granddaughter on the 
paternal side of Ezekiel Tewksbury, a native of Amherst, Massachusetts, 
who inarried Sallie Barron, of North Haverhill, New Hampshire. On 
the maternal side she was a granddaughter of Andrew and Jane Lynn, 
of Brown County, Ohio. Mrs. Sarah L. Peebles died July 7, 1881, leav- 
ing one daughter, Martha Steele Peebles. Mr. Peebles married, 
second, in 1888, Antoinette Lloyd. She was born in Portsmouth, 
a daughter of Richard and ]\Iary Ella (Bentley) Lloyd, and a grand- 
driughtcr on the maternal side of Aholiab and Mary (McCauley) Bent- 



800 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

ley, and great-granddaughter of Benjamin and ]\Iary (Baldwin) Bent- 
ley. By his second marriage Mr. Peebles has two children, ^Miriam and 
Joseph Bentley. Martha Steele Peebles married Elmer Dover, and has 
one daughter, Mary Elizabeth Dover. j\Iiriam, his youngest daughter, 
is the wife of Jay Lee Cross, and they have one child, Jay Lee Cross, Jr. 
Joseph Bentley Peebles married Ellen Vandervoert, and they have one 
child, ]\Iartha Bentley Peebles. 

Mr. and Mrs. Peebles are meml)ers of the Secoud Presbyterian Chureli, 
and have reared their children in the same religious faith. Fraternally 
Mr. Peebles is a member of Aurora Lodge No. 48, Aneient Free and 
Accepted Order of Masons; of Mount Vernon Chapter No. 23, Royal 
Arch Masons; of Solomon Council No. 79, Royal and Select Ma.sters; of 
Cavalry Commandery No. 13, Knights Templar; of the Ohio Con- 
sistory ; of Syrian Temple, Ancient Arabic Order of the Nobles of the 
^lystic Shrine; and is a thirty-third degree ^lason, and an honorary 
member of Trinity Consistory No. 2. of NasliviUe, Tennessee. 

George Ott Newaiax. Noteworthy among the more highly esteemed 
and respected citizens of Portsmouth is George Ott Newman, who has 
for many years been actively engaged in the practice of law. He was 
born November 9, 1836, in Staunton, Virginia, a sou of Hon. William 
and Catherine (Ott) Newman. An extencted account of his ancestors 
may be found elsewhere in this volume, in comiection with the sketch 
of his brother-in-law, the late Joseph G. Reed. 

Hon. William Newman was born in Salem, Roanoke Count}'. Vir- 
ginia, January 19, 1807, and was there l)red and educated. Coming to 
Ohio at the age of twenty years, he located at Newark, and there, in 
1828, cast his first presidential vote for Andrew Jackson. Returning to 
Virginia, he lived for a time in Woodstock, Shenandoah County, from 
there moving to Staunton, where he engaged in mercantile business. In 
1838 he again came to Ohio, this time bringing v.ith him his wife aiid 
two children. He journeyed witli lior.se and carriage to Wheeling, and 
from there to Portsmouth, Ohio, by boat. At the death of his father, in 
1840, he went to Highland County to settle the parental estate. Return- 
ing to Portsmouth at the end of one year, he established himself as a con- 
tractor and builder, and in that capacity erected many of the finer brick 
buildings of the city, including residences, business blocks, churches and 
school buildings. Very successful in his operations, he continued the 
Imsiness until his death, July 23, 1874. He was a member of the Ohio 
Senate in 1860 and 1861. 

Hon. William Newman married, in 1834, at AVoodstock, A'irgiiiia, 
Mrs. Catherine (Ott) Williams, whose deatii occurred July 8, 1856. Six 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 801 

children were bom of their union, as follows: Anna M., widow of 
Joseph G. Reed ; George Ott ; William H. ; James W. ; Rigdon ; and 
Charles H. William H. Newman served as captain of Company A, 
Thirty-ninth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, during the Civil war, and later 
was for a number of years clerk in the treasury department at Wash- 
ington, D. C. He spent his last years in California, dying in Los Angeles. 
Charles Newman, Avho became an Episcopalian minister, held pastorates 
in various places, and died in Florida. Rigdon Newman learned the 
printer's trade, and subsequently located in Louisville, Kentucky, where 
his death occurred. 

Acquiring his elementary education in the public schools of Ports- 
mouth, George Ott Newman subsequently entered the Ohio Wesleyan 
University, at Delaware, and was there graduated with the class of 
1858. Beginning then the study of law in the office of Moore & Johnson, 
he was admitted to the bar by the District Court of Morrow County on 
August 1, 1860, and at once began the practice of his profession in 
Portsmouth. 

In 1860 Mr. Newman joined the state militia and was commissioned 
first sergeant of Company A, Fifteenth Ohio Volunteer Militia. The 
company responded to Lincoln's first call for troops in April, 1861, and 
became Company G, First Ohio Volunteer Infantry, which was mus- 
tered into the United States service at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, April 
29, 1861. Mr. Newman was with his regiment until August 1, 1861, 
when he was honorably discharged with his regiment, his term of enlist- 
ment having expired. Upon his return to Portsmouth his many friends 
insisted that he should be a candidate for prosecuting attorney of 
Scioto County, and he was elected to that office on the democratic ticket 
for one term. Mr. Newnnan subsequently engaged in the practice of his 
chosen profession, and through his legal skill and ability built up a 
large and lucrative patronage. 

Mr. Newman married, September 12, 1866, to IMiss Clay B. Mooiv, a 
daughter of Oscar F. and Martha B. ( Scott j Moore. Four children 
have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Newman, namely : Oscar W., 
Kate, wife of Edwin N. Alger, has one daughter. Clay Alger; Russell 
C, who married Mary Bayrd, and has one child, Oscar New-man ; and 
Fannie C, wife of Edward H. Shaw, of Atlanta, Georgia, who has three 
children, George N., Oscar ]\I. and Helen M. Shaw-. Mr. Newman served 
as a member of the board of city electors until the board was abolished, 
has been president of the board of trustees of the public libraiy since 
its organization in 1879, and president of the Portsmouth Bar Associa- 
tion since its organization in 1901. He belongs to two college frater- 
nities, the Sigma Chi and the Phi Beta Kappa. 



802 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

II. S. WiLLARD. One of the men most prominent in the coal and iron 
development of Jackson County and elsewhere, and for many years 
president of the First National Bank of Wellston. 

He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, August 31, 1849. It was only the 
accident of birth that made him a native of Cincinnati, since his parents 
were at that time living at Buckhorn Furnace in Lawrence County, 
Ohio. Four months after his birth his father, Henry S. Willard, died at 
Buckhorn Furnace. When he was a boy of ten years his mother married 
0. B. Gould of Franklin Furnace, Scioto County. 

Mr. Willard, after the public schools, completed his education in the 
School of Technology at Boston, and then went to Kansas. From 
there he returned to Ohio and in March, 1873, went to Jackson County, 
where Wellston was subsequently founded. He became superintendent 
of the Milton Furnace & Coal Company, and inaugurated the develop- 
ment of the Wellston coal fields by sinking the Milton shaft and building 
the Milton furnace. This furnace was first blown in June, 1874. During 
the past forty years Mr. Willard has been actively engaged in the mining 
of coal and the manufacture of pig iron, and incidentally has become 
connected with many other enterprises in various places, extending as 
far west as the Pacific coast. He has been president of the First National 
Bank of Wellston since its organization in 1886. 

Mr. Willard was married at Emporia, Kansas, September 4, 1872, 
to Miss Kate L. Robinson, daughter of Newton L. Robinson of Ports- 
mouth, Ohio. They have three children : Kate Robinson, Pauline and 
Henry S., Jr. 

Judge John Davisson. Some important history of early Lawrence 
County, and of the beginnings of fronton, is illustrated by the career of 
Judge John Davisson, one of the most prominent pioneers of the Hang- 
ing Rock Iron Region, and a man whose memory is gratefully cherished 
by his many descendants in this section and whose work and influence 
should not pass unmentioned in any history of the locality. 

Judge John Davisson was born in Maryland in 1777, came to Ohio 
and about 1801 settled on a tract of land beginning with the south bank 
of Storms Creek, following the Ohio River south to a point near where 
the D. T. & I. depot now stands, thence by a due east line out over 
the "Chronacher Hill" near the tunnel on Park Avenue. He was one ol' 
the pioneers who cleared away the timber and farmed the land on whicli 
the lower portion of fronton now stands. He built his first log cabin 
about where the "old mill" used to stand, and set out fruit trees around 
it. Each year saw more land cleared and brought under cultivation until 
in 1812 he built a tnodern hewn log house, which stood about where 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 803 

BiK'khorn Street crosses Fourth Street. Being one of the most pros- 
perous farmers in this neighborhood, in 1822 he built the first brick 
house ever erected in this part of the country. For that purpose he 
l)rought ])rickmakers from Columbus, and they made and burned the 
brick on his own land and laid them in the walls. This was a two-story 
residence and marked a new era in home building for the surrounding 
neighborhood, and attracted no little attention. It stood just back of the 
present New Excelsior shoe factory, fronting the river. It was occupied 
by his widow and family after his death until 1848, when the farm was 
sold for a townsite for Ironton, and the first lots were sold in June, 1849. 
This old house stood as a landmark long after the town started, but was 
torn down in 1892 to make way for improvements. 

Judge Davissoii was one of the most influential men in the public 
life of the county, serving as squire for many years before Lawrence 
County was organized, in what was then Upper Township of Scioto 
County, taking its name from its position as the upper township in 
that county. Portsmouth then was the metropolis of this section. When 
Lawrence County was organized in 1817, Judge Davisson with two other 
gentlemen — Miller and Kerr — were made associate .judges for the new 
county, Mr. Davisson being chosen presiding judge. He held court at 
Burlington, the new county seat, for a number of years. Between 1821 
and 1826 he served three terms in the State Legislature, first at Chilli- 
cothe and last at Columbus. He made the trips to the capital on horse- 
Imck, and stayed there all winter or throughout the session. The year 
lie died — 1831 — he Avas to have stood for the state senatorship, but a 
malignant disease cut short his useful life in its prime. In early life 
Judge Davisson was a splendid marksman and a great wolf hunter. 

His wife was Susanah Lambert, born in New Jersey just twenty days 
after the Declaration of Independence. She died in 1848. They reared 
a splendid family of twelve children, nine sons and three daughters, who 
in turn have founded some of the best families of this region and in 
western states. 

Rev. Charles Boardman Taylor^ Ph. D. One of the oldest and best 
known ministers and school men in southern Ohio is Charles Boardman 
Taylor. 

He has some notable ancestors. His great-grandfather, Eliphalet 
Taylor, was a private in the Revolutionary army. His grandfather, 
Tlieodore Taylor, volunteered in 1799 and joined the army collected 
under the venerable Washington for the defense of this country in the 
threatened war with France. Doctor Taylor himself and liis father, 
Rev. Warren Taylor, were both members of Ohio regiments in the Civil 



804 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

war. Thus few families have a record of more service in tlie wars 
of the nation. Doctor Taylor's father was a member of Company E 
of the 140th Ohio Volunteer Infantry and served a hundred days and 
received an honorable discharge. In 1862 Charles B. Taylor enlisted 
in Company G of the Eighty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and in 18bo 
was transferred to the First Ohio Heavy Artillers^ His service as a sol- 
dier continued from 1862 until after the close of the war in 1865. Most of 
his service was in the mountain regions of West Virginia, East Tennessee 
and East Kentuckj-, in the zone between the major operations of the con- 
tending armies of the East and West. Doctor Taylor is now a member 
of Sergeant Reed Post No. 253 of the Grand Army of the Republic, and 
is chaplain of the Post. 

Charles Boardman Taylor was born February 6, 1846, a son of 
Reverend AVarren and IMargaret (Walton) Taylor. Forty-six years ago 
he was ordained as a minister of the Presbyterian church. Since then 
he has preached in Vinton and Athens counties, Ohio, and for upwards 
of half a centuiy his work has been either as a minister or as a practical 
educator. For two years he spent most of his time preaching to deaf 
mutes throughout the state. As a churchman Doctor Taylor has offici- 
ated at 280 weddings, about 1,300 funerals and has received into his 
church 640 persons. It is said that he has married and buried more 
people in Vinton County than any other minister. He founded and 
built the church at Guysville in Athens County, and assisted Rev. J. 1'. 
A. Dickey in reorganizing the church at ]Mc Arthur twenty-five yeai's 
ago, and since ]\Iarch 1, 1895, liis home and work have 1)een identified 
with this town of Vinton County. He has also filled pastorates at Deer- 
field, Guj'sville, Brownsville, Wilkesville and ]\IcArthur, filling the same 
pastorate at Wilkesville which had been honored by his father before 
him. Doctor Taylor's son. Warren L., has also preached in Wilkesville, 
so that members of three successive generations have filled that pulpit. 

He is president of the Vinton County Civic League, which is a local 
supplement to the Ohio anti-saloon organization. He also served eight 
years as a member of the Board of School Examiners of Vinton County, 
but retired from tliat office in 1907. 

Doctor Ta.ylor is the author of two school books : Lessons in Psychol- 
ogy and Lessons in Law. His name also appears as the author of two 
historical works : Wilkesville and Salem, and The Presbytery of Athens. 

By ancestry he is of old New England stock. His father, Rev. War- 
ren Taylor, was born in New Hampshire October 6, 1814. The grand- 
father, Theodore Taylor, was a pative of Rhode Island, but lived for 
many years in New Hampshire, and finally came out to ^Michigan, whore 
he died at the age of sixty-three. Warren Taylor grew up and was 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 805 

educated in the East, attended tlie Union College at .Schenectady, New 
York, and later became a prominent educator and Presbyterian minister. 
He was ordained at AVarren in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1844, and 
as a preacher and teacher he spent an active career ot forty-six years. 
He died in Ross County, Ohio, April 21, 1890. It was while filling the 
pastorate at Wilkesville in Vinton County that lie established a private 
school known as the Wilkesville Normal Academy. He was prominently 
known and esteemed over several counties of Ohio. Rev. AVarren Tay- 
lor was married April 24, 1840, at Freehold, New Jersey, to Miss Mai-- 
garet AValton. She w-as born and reared in New Jersey and she died 
in the arras of her son. Doctor Taylor, at his home ^lay 6, 1892. She 
was born in 1820, and throughout her life was a devout Presbyterian. 
She became the mother of four sons. One of these, Rev. V. E. Tayloi', 
who died at the home of his brother, Dr. Charles B., in 1912, was for 
thirty-four years an active minister of the Presbyterian Church and 
never married. Rev. Park W. Taylor, another bx'other, is now a home 
missionary and serving in a jurisdiction on the west side of the Appa- 
lachian range of mountains in Tennessee, and is also unmarried. 15. G. 
Taylor, the other brother, is a carpenter by trade, lives in Dayton, Ohio, 
and is married and has a family of children. 

At "Wilkesville, Ohio, February 15, 1866, Dr. Charles B. Taylor 
married Miss Bettie Ruth Davis. She was born neai- Wilkesville. but 
in IMeigs County, Ohio, January 28, 1848. She was a student with her 
husband under the direction of Rev. AVarren Taylor. Her grandfather, 
John Davis, came fi'om Eastern New York, and was a pioneer in the 
Wilkesville connuunity of Ohio, having located there in 1818, and \\\r. 
land which he acquired from the Government and which was improved 
by his laboi's is still in tiie family, being owned by a great-grandson, 
John Williams. Airs. Tayloi- 's father, Erastus Davis, was born in New 
York in 1815, and was two and a half years of age when the family located 
in Vinton County. He grew to manhood in that locality, and subse- 
quently became a flour and sawmill man. lie married Phoebe B. Brown 
of the old. Brown family of Amesville, Ohio. They lived happily together 
for more than forty y(>avs, and were active iiieinl)ers of the Presbyterian 
Church at Wilkesville. 

To Dr. and Airs. Taylor have been born the rollowiiig children: 
Phebe, wife of II. AI. Lee of P>ailey, Aliehigan, owner of a line mill at 
that town, and they have five sons and one daughter, one son Iteing in 
the United States Army, and one in tlie United States Navy; Cornelia 
A^. is a missionary worker, and for the past three years has been located 
at Beaumont, Texas; Alargaret AV. is the wife of Jolni AIcGathey, who 
is connected with the National Cash Register Conninm- at Daxioii, Ohio: 



806 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Rev. Warren Lincoln Taylor is a Presbyterian home missionary and his 
work is on the east side of the Appalachian Mountains at Eskota, North 
Carolina, and is married and has one daughter; Adaline is the wife 
of Albert G. Poston, and they live at Pliny, West Virginia, and have 
a family of several children ; Eunice L. is supervisor of primary teach- 
ing at Rio Grande College, Ohio; Rev. Arthur Hamilton Taylor is now 
finishing his course in the Lane Seminary at Cincinnati ; Esther M. is 
a teacher in the public schools of Covington, Kentucky, where she has 
been located for the past three years; E. Scott, the youngest, is mak- 
ing his home at IMcArthur, where he is connected with a feed store, and 
he married Miss Norma Trainer of McArthur. 

CoRYDON E. NouRSE. As a building contractor Cory don E. Noursc 
has been identified with Portsmouth and Scioto County for many years, 
and his work is exemplified in hundreds of structures, including busi- 
ness blocks and private residences, and his reputation for responsible 
management and systematic execution of every contract is thoroughly 
established. 

Cory don E. Nourse was bofn at Friendship, in Nile Township, 
Scioto County, June 26, 1872. He comes of pioneer stock in this sec- 
tion of Ohio. His father was Oliver Nourse, who was born at Cary 
Run, in Scioto County, while Grandfather Joshua Nourse was one of 
tlie pioneers in this section. Joshua bought land at Gary Run, and put 
up a frame house which is still standing and in a good state of repair. 
The work of carpentry has been almost a family profession, and the 
grandfather was an excellent workman at the trade and did building 
for many of the early residents of Scioto County, where he lived as a 
resident until his death. His remains now rest in the Vaughter Ceme- 
tery. Joshua Nourse married Elizabeth Noland, and their five chil- 
dren were Oliver, Corydon, Elliott, Elizabeth and Lucy. 

Oliver Nourse, the father, also learned the trade of carpentry, and 
in early manhood, in 1861, volunteered for service in Company A of 
tlie Ohio Infantry. He saw some active service as a soldier and made 
a good record. After his honorable discharge he returned home, and 
continued working at his trade until his death at the age of fifty-six. 
Oliver married Sarah Walker. She was born at Turkey Creek, in Nile 
Township, a daughter of John Walker. She survived her husband 
only a short time and was of the same age at the time of her death. 
Her six chiUlren who grew up were Lucy, Corydon E., William J., 
Pryor. Edith and Edna. 

Corydon E. Nourse attended the public schools as a boy and early 
began assisting his father as a carpenter and thus has been a practical 



HANGING ROCK IRO^^ REGION 807 

man of the trade foi' almost a quarter of a century. By 1893, when 
he reached his majority, he began taking contracts for his own execu- 
tion. In 1898 Mr. Nourse left Ohio and spent a year in San Antonio. 
Texas, and from there moved to St. Louis, and during the five years 
spent in that city continued working at his trade, and a part of the 
time was employed in the construction of the World's Pair buildings. 
Since returning to Scioto County Mr. Nourse has continued his busi- 
ness as a contractor, and has successfully carried out contracts for 
many private houses and business blocks. 

June 26, 1895, he married Bertha M. Cook, who was born in Nile 
Township, a daughter of John H. and Lulu (Early) Cook. The four 
children of Mr. and Mrs. Nourse are Audr}^ Guy, Lulu and Ronald. 
Mr. Nourse and wife are members of the Manley IMethodist Episcopal 
Church, in politics he is a republican and is now serving on the city 
school board, while his fraternal affiliations are with Massie Lodge 
No. 115 of the Knights of Pythias. 

William B. Anderson. This name of a prominent Portsmoulli 
merchant bespeaks an extensive relationship with pioneer families in 
Southern Ohio, including the W^arwicks, the Russells, the Hiblis, Lucas 
and others. The Andersons have been active in local ])usiness affairs 
for many years, and William B. Anderson is president of the Anderson 
Brothers Company and president of the Portsmouth Board of Trade. 

He was born at Howards Mills, Kentucky. His father, the late 
George Washington Anderson, was bom in Bath County, Kentucky, 
January 18, 1830. Grandfather William Anderson, a native of Vir- 
ginia, left that state for Kentucky, and spent the rest of his days on 
a farm in Bath County. He married Fanny Graham, whose father 
was Judge Graham, of Virginia. George W. Anderson began his 
business career at the age of sixteen, as clerk in his uncle's store in 
Mercer County, Kentucky, and two years later became clerk on the 
steamboat Blue Wing, running between Frankfort and Louisville. Six 
montlis of that and he returned to fiercer County, and in 185G went 
to Cincinnati to take a course of training in Bartletfs Commercial 
College, and remained for a time as one of the teachers. From 1857 
mitil the winter of 1859-60 he had a store at Howards :\Iills. Kentucky, 
following which he was successively engaged in merchandising at 
Camargo for two years and then at ]\It. Sterling. The war was in 
])rogress, and Mt. Sterling was raided by John ^lorgan's l)and. Being 
apprised of the enemy's approach, l\Ir. Anderson secreted liis most 
valuable goods in some coffins owned by an undertaker who. while a 
southern sympathizer, was a true friend of the merchant. By this 



8U8 HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 

littlf stratog:>'. the goods were saved, but on. a second raid by the same 
hiiv.d his store was cleaned out and he determined to remove to the 
north side of the Ohio River. Accordingly, in October, 1864, he moved 
lo Portsmouth and with Peter Helms opened a store on Market Street. 
When peace came a few months later, he returned to Mt. Sterling, 
but in February, 1867, began a nioi'e permanent connection with Ports- 
mouth as a business man. His store this time was on Second Street at 
the corner of Court, but in the fall it was removed to a building erected 
for him by Dan McFarland in the same block. 

The only other interruption to his career as a Portsmouth merchant 
came in 1872, when he sold out and went to Kansas and tried both 
luercharidising and farming in the Sunflower State, being member of 
tlie firsn of J. F. Warwick & Company. Having disposed of his Kansas 
interests in 3871 and returned to Portsmouth, George W. Anderson 
bought the shoe store of R. M. Lloyd & Company on Chillicothe Street. 
The stock was later moved to Second Street, occupying the west half 
ol; the building later the home of the Ilibbs Hardware Company, on 
tlie north side of Second between Court and Market. While in tliat 
location W^. B. Anderson became associated with his father under the 
j'irm naine of G. W. Anderson & Son, and the subsequent admission of 
Eugene G. .\nderson changed the title to G. W. Anderson & Sons. A 
stock of dry goods was added in 1886, and a change made to more 
commodious quarters in the Huston Stone Front, opposite, but after 
nine years the store was moved to near the W^ashington Hotel. That 
remained tlie place of business until after the death of George W. 
Anderson, which occurred October 8, 1895. 

On October 22. 1857, George W. Anderson married Annie Warwick. 
Her father. Dr. Beverly G. AVarwick. was born in Nelson County, 
\'irginia, December 25, IHOo, a son of Nelson Warwick, and was lib- 
erally educated for the time. In 1825 he taught in Nelson County at 
Bethel Church, moved to Augusta C'ounty in 1827, teaching three 
years near AVaynesboro, and for four years followed the same work 
at Staunton. In the meantime he had studied medicine under Dr. T. 
Reynolds, and in 1887 attended lectures in the Ohio Aledical College 
of Cincinnati. Beginning in 1838, he practiced a year at Deerfield in 
Augusta County of his home state, and then at Middlebrook, A^irginia, 
until 1856. In 1857 he was graduated from the ]\Iiami INledical College 
and the following winter attended Ohio Aledical College, whicli also 
gave him a diploma. Doctor Warwick was also a minister of the 
gospel, having been licensed as a local preaclier of the Methodist 
Church in 1850 and in 1857 was ordained a deacon by Bishop ^Morris. 
Doctor Warwick caiii(> 1n Portsmonth in 1858, bnt the following year 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 809 

removed to Lucasville, where he kept a general store and drug store, 
])esides other professional activities, and lived there until his death 
on June 14, 1880. Doctor Warwick married, September 19, 1833, Mary 
Fisher, a daughter of Anthony Fisher, of Churchville, Virginia. She 
died February 1, 1902, the mother of seven children. 

George W. Anderson and wife had thirteen children, and those who 
grew up were : William Beverly ; ^Maggie M., wife of Dr. J. N. W. 
Ci-awford ; Sallie J., who died at Cincinnati October 13, 1901, the wife 
of Dr. F. H. Williams, of Portsmouth; George B., who died at Cin- 
cinnati January 13, 1902; John Frank; Charles N., president of the 
Anderson-Newcomb Company, of Huntington, West Virginia; Eugene 
G., president of the Western Dry Goods Company, Seattle ; Preston H., 
in the department store of Hale Bros., San Francisco; Warwick W., 
secretary and treasurer of the Anderson Bros. Company, Portsmouth, 
Ohio; Nelson R., an attorney, of Seattle; and Crawford, secretary of 
the Western Dry Goods Company, Seattle. 

William: B. Anderson was a pupil in public schools until sixteen, 
and then began a practical business experience which has covered forty- 
one years. His tirst work was in his father's store, and in 1878 he was 
made a partner. In March, 1900, the store was removed to its present 
location on Chillicothe Street, the building having been erected for the 
company by Doctor Crawford. In 1903 Mr. Anderson acquired title 
to the adjoining building, and now the extensive stocks of the various 
departments occupy four floors in the two buildings. In 1904 the firm 
was incorporated as Anderson Brothers Company, with Mr. Anderson 
president, Charles N. Anderson vice president and Warwick W. Ander- 
son secretary^ and treasurer. Since then Russell W. Anderson has 
come into the company as second vice president. 

Besides being executive head of one of the chief mercantile houses 
of the Hanging Rock region, Mr. Anderson is vice president and director 
of the Security Savings & Trust Company, a director of the Breece 
Manufacturing Company, vice president of the Anderson-Newcomb 
Company, of Huntington, West Virginia. He is president of the Ports- 
mouth Board of Trade, and for many years has been public spiritedly 
identified with both the commercial and civic welfare of this city. 

In 1886 Mr. Anderson married Miss Ida Russell, who was born near 
Lucasville, in Scioto County, a daughter of William B. and Rebecca 
(Hibbs) Russell, a family with some early and prominent relations with 
at the age of fourteen, learned the trade of hatter in Philadelphia, and 
the affairs of this section of Ohio. William B. Russell was born at 
West Union, in Adams County, Ohio, in 1810. His father, Hon. Wil- 
liam Russell, a native of Ireland and left an orphan, came to America 



810 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

at the age of fourteen, learned the trade of hatter iu Philadelphia, and 
followed it at Maysville, Kentucky, until 1802. In that year he estab- 
lished his home at West Union, in Adains County, Ohio, and for many 
years was a merchant and prominent in early state politics. He repre- 
sented Adams County in the first Legislature, which met at Chillicothe, 
and when Scioto County was organized in 1803 was appointed the first 
clerk of courts, an office he resigned in 1804. In 1809 he was again 
elected to represent Adams County in the Legislature, and in February, 
1810, was appointed associate judge for Scioto County, resigning iu 
1812. In 1811 he represented Adams County in the Legislature which 
met in Zanesville, and the same county in 1819 sent him to the State 
Senate, and he w^as re-elected in 1820. His political career was a nota- 
ble one, and in the fall of 1826 he was elected on the democratic ticket 
to Congress, aiid was twice re-elected from the same district. In 1833 
he removed to Scioto County to engage in the iron business, and in 
1841 was again sent to Congress, this time as a whig. At the end of 
his term he located on his farm on Brush Creek, where he spent the 
rest of his days. Says Evans, the local historian: "He filled each and 
every office with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of his con- 
stituents." By his marriage in 1802 to Nancy Wood were born six 
sons and one daughter. 

William B. Russell, father of ]\lrs. Anderson, was educated in early 
life for the profession of physician, but did not complete his course in 
medical college, and turned his attention to agriculture and horticulture 
on his farm in Brush Creek Township. Later he came to Portsmouth 
to give his children school advantages and became accountant in the 
hardware store of his brother-in-law. J. L. Hibbs. He died at Ports- 
Tnouth at the age of seventy-five. His first wufe was Rhoda Hered, 
daughter of George and Elizabeth (Kendal) Hered. Her five children 
were named George, John, Joseph, Carrie and Ellen. The second wife, 
and the mother of Mrs. Anderson, was Rebecca Lucas Hibbs. She was 
bom in Union Township of Scioto County, August 3, 1825. Her 
father, Jacob Hibbs, Sr., was born in Pennsylvania November 5, 1703. 
Jacob's father was Aaron, one of the first .settlers in Adams County, 
Ohio, having located near the present site of Locust Grove about 1800. 
Aaron married Catherine Humphreys, and he died in 1852 and she in 
1846. Jacob Hibbs assisted in clearing a farm from the wilderness 
and after his marriage removed to Union Township, in Scioto County, 
where he died in 1852. His marriage to Rebecca Lucas introduces 
another interesting family into this record. Her father. Judge Joseph 
Lucas, was born in Virginia in 1771. His father, William Lucas, was 
born in Virginia in 1742, and February 13, 1777, enlisted for three 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 811 

years in the Second Virginia Regiment and served with tlie rank of 
captain. In Virginia he was a large planter, operating with slave laljor. 
In 1800, having sold his Virginia estate, he moved into the Northwest 
Territory to join his sons, who had preceded him as pioneers. He 
located at Lucasville and died there in 1814, being buried in the Lucas- 
ville Cemetery with military honors appropriate to his service as a 
Revolutionary soldier. Judge Joseph Lucas had come into Ohio in 
1797, accompanied by his brother William, for the purpose of locating 
their father's land warrants, and settled at the mouth of Pond Creek, 
in what is now Rush Township, Adams County, then. Joseph Lucas 
was well educated and took a prominent part in affairs, being one of 
the three who represented Adams County in the first session of the State 
Legislature. At the session beginning in ]\Iarch, 1803, at Chillicothe, 
Scioto County was organized, and he was one of the men appointed 
associate judge of the new county, an office he held until his death in 
1808. Joseph Lucas married Hannah Iluiuphrcys, and they reared 
three sons and three daughters. 

Mrs. Anderson was one of six children, namely : Charles F., William 
L., Edward W., Mary G., Ida and Mabel Russell. Mr. W\ B. Anderson 
and wife have reared seven children, named Maud, Russell W., Ann E., 
Margaret, William B., Jr., Richard L. and John L. Maud is the wife 
of Arthur N. Horr, and has two children, Beverly David and Arthur N. 
Russell W. Anderson married Ruth C. Pontius. Ann E. is the wife of 
Oliver Morton Shumway. Mr. Anderson and wife are mem])ers of the 
Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, and he is president of the board 
of trustees and has been superintendent of the Sunday School twenty- 
five years. His fraternal membership is in Aurora Lodge No. 48, 
A. F. & A. M., Mount Vernon Chapter No. 23, R. A. M., Solomon 
Council No. 79, R. & S. M., and Calvary Commandery No. 13, K. T. 

Joseph Edward Shump. The special success of Joseph Edward 
Shump in Scioto County has been in the field of real estate operations. 
Mr. Shump is a resident of Sciotoville, and has been known since early 
manhood to this community as a successful teacher, a worker for others 
in various lines, and as a shrewd and foresighted investor in real estate. 
He has done much 1^o develop Sciotoville and has large interests in the 
South. 

Joseph Edward Shump was born at Sciotoville, a son of William 
Shump, and a grandson of Conrad Shump. The last named was born 
in Germany, where his name was spelled Schumppe. He was the only 
member of his immediate family to come to America, arrived in this 
country when a young man and lived in Pennsylvania several years. 



812 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

and from there came in the early days to Seioto County, buying a tract 
of timbered land in Harrison Township. A number of years were 
devoted to the heavy task of clearing off this forest and tilling the soil, 
and in that community he died at the age of eighty-eight years. Among 
his children were AVilliam, Henry, Theodore, Louis, John and Mrs. Sarah 
AVeeks. 

William Shump, the father, was born in Pennsylvania in 1838, was 
l)rought to Ohio when a child, and grew up on the old farm in Harrison 
Township. When still a young man, in 1862, he enlisted for service in 
the Union army, joining the Seventh Ohio Cavalry. Few Scioto County 
volunteers had a more active service than William Shump. His regi- 
ment participated in the Kentucky campaign during 1862, then in the 
operations through Tennessee, was with Sherman's army on its advance 
from Chickamauga to Atlanta, and then returned to Tennessee with 
the troops in pursuit of Hood's army, participating in those sharp 
and sanguinary conflicts at Franklin and Nashville. During the Ken- 
tucky campaign he fought at Mount Sterling, Button Hill, Monticello, 
Rocky Gap, in Tennessee was at Cumberland Gap, Blue Springs, the 
siege of Knoxville, Bains Crossroads and Newmarket. At the close of 
the war he was discharged with his regiment and returned home and 
for several years was connected with the Harrison Furnace. He then 
removed to Sciotoville, and is now living retired in that village. 

William Shump married Maria Corriell. Hers is one of the old 
families of the Hanging Rock region. She was born in Porter Town- 
ship of Scioto County, a daughter of Sela Corriell. Her grandfather 
was a native of New Jersey, and from that state emigrated to Ohio about 
1825 and bought a tract of land in Harrison Township, where he 
improved a farm and lived until his death. Sela Corriell, who was born 
in New Jersey about 1807, was a young man when he accompanied his 
parents to Ohio, and subsequently bought a tract of Government land 
bordering the Scioto River. His first improvement was a log house, to 
which subsequently was placed an addition of frame, and after several 
years he sold out and removed to Portsmouth and was a resident there 
at the time of his death, at the age of eighty years. Mr. Corriell mar- 
ried Mary Welch, who was also born in New Jersey, and died at the age 
of seventy-two. The nine children reared by Mr. and Mrs. Corriell 
are named Thomas, Abraham, Maria, Izora, Herbert L., Raymond, Rosa, 
Warren and John. Mr. and Mrs. William Shump had five children: 
Henry; Thomas; Mary, who married George Royal; Isabella, who mar- 
ried Robert Leithner; and Joseph Edward. 

Mr. Joseph E. Shump grew up in Sciotoville, where his education 
came from the local schools, and having qualified himself for that voca- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 813 

lion, he began teaching at the age of nineteen. His first term of school 
was in the MeCullough District in Union Township, and he taught in 
several different districts, and his final teaching was in the high school 
at Rarden. Following that he was for four years a clerk in the office 
of the N. A¥. Railroad, and in 1907 opened an office for the real estate 
business at Portsmouth. That has been his home office from which 
he has conducted his operations, which, however, have chiefly centered 
in Seiotoville. Having foreseen the growth and development of this 
town, he invested all his capital in local real estate, and has improved 
several pieces of property. Mr. Shump is also largely interested in 
real estate development in Florida, being one of the interested parties 
in the development of the tract of 118,000 acres around Felsmere. 

Mr. Shump was married December 21, 1898, to Estella B. Mathiot. 
Hhe was bom at Lyra, Scioto County, a daughter of Samuel S. and 
Louisa (McCurdy) Mathiot. Mr. and Mrs. Shump have one son, Edwin 
Leroy. They are members of the First Baptist Church of Portsmouth. 

Fraternally Mr. Shump has affiliations with Aurora Lodge No. 48, 
A. F. & A. M.. Solomon Council No. 79, R. & S. M., Mount Vernon 
Chapter No. 23, R. A. M., and Calvary Commandery No. 13, K. T.; 
also with Massie Lodge No. 115, Knights of Pythias, Modern Woodmen 
of America Camp No. 3993, and Lodge No. 154 of the Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the Sons of Veterans. 
Mr. Shump has taken much interest in local affairs at Portsmouth, was 
elected a member of the city council in 1908 and again chosen to the 
same position in 1913. 

R<iBERT Orm Richardson. One of the large and valuable estates of 
Scioto County belongs to the Richardson family, and Robert 0. Rich- 
ardson's chief business activity at Portsmouth is the care and manage- 
ment of these various properties. The Richardsons have lived in Scioto 
County for many years, and Mr. Richardson's mother's family, the 
Ormes, were among the very early settlers in this region. 

Robert Orm Richardson is a native of Portsmouth and a son of 
tlie late John Richardson, who was born in County Monaghan, Ireland. 
The grandfather was born in the same locality, and the great-grand- 
parents were Robert and Martha (McDonald) Richardson. Robert 
Richardson was a farmer, probably lived in Ireland all his life, and his 
wife was a native of Scotland. The family were Presbyterians in re- 
ligion and reared their children in the same faith. The late John 
Richard.son left home when a yoiith. came to America, landed in New 
York City, worked in various lines there for a time, and then came to 
Portsmouth, where he was employed by an uncle. His only capital at 



814 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

that time was good health and willing hands. By attending strictly to 
business and by his thrift he was eventually able to enter the grocery 
business at the corner of Chillicothe and Fifth streets. He was a man 
of unusual business capacity, and had a large and prosperous business 
as a merchant. His surplus capital was invested in city and farm 
property, and he finally retired from the grocery trade and devoted his 
attention to his real estate and other private affairs. His death occurred 
xNovember 22, 1909. 

The late John Richardson married Phylara Orme. She was born 
in Clay Township of Scioto County. Her father was -lohn Orme, a 
native of Maryland, and her grandfather, John Orme, Sr.. was l)oi'n 
near Hagerstown, Maryland, of English parents. The senior Orme was 
reared and married in Maryland, came to Ohio with his family about 
1812, having made the journey by wagons over bad roads and in some 
parts through the iinbroken forests. They bought a flatboat on reaching 
the Ohio River, and made the rest of the journey l)y water to Ports- 
mouth. Arriving in Scioto County, Grandfather Orme rented the 
Ofner farm, lived in a log house, and that land is now included within 
the city limits of Portsmouth. For a number of years he farmed suc- 
cessfully, and then bought land about five miles north of the coui't- 
house, and cleared a farm from the midst of the woods. John Orme, Sr., 
and family endured all the hardships of pioneer life. The women of 
the household worked at the spinning-wheel and even gave their assist- 
ance in the farm work proper. At that time Portsmouth was the market 
town for the settlements many miles around, and the Orme children 
often walked into town, carrying chickens, eggs and other produce to 
market. As a matter of interest it should be noted that they sold the 
eggs for three cents a dozen. The children were educated in a small 
log schoolhouse, with only one window, covered with gi'eased paper, the 
school term lasting for about three months each year. Jolm Orme, Sr., 
lived on the farm north of Portsmouth until his death, Marcli 25, 1844, 
at the age of seventy-six. He married in 179S at Hagerstown, Mary- 
land, Elizabeth Graham, and they reared a family of eiglil cliildren. 
Their son, John Orme, Jr., w-as very young when l)ronght to Ohio, gn'w 
up in this new country, and after reaching manhood bought some 
Scioto bottom lands in Clay Township. In that vicinity he continued 
his home until his death. John Orme, Jr., married Philma Ilayward, 
daughter of IMoses Hayward, an old family which is sketched on other 
pages of this work. The late John Richardson and wife were the par- 
ents of two children : Essie, who married George F. Thomas, and lives 
in Portsmouth, and Robert 0. 

Robert O. Ricliardson acquired his early education in tlie city 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 815 

schools of Portsmouth, and his first business experience was in his 
father's store. After that he went on the road as salesman for the 
National Biscuit Company, and continued to represent that well-known 
corporation for fifteen years. Since leaving the biscuit company, 
Mr. Richardson has devoted his time to the management of his father's 
estate. 

In 1912 he married Catherine Strayer, daughter of J. Frank and 
p]lizaheth Strayer. Mr. and IMrs. Richardson are members of the Sec- 
ond Presbyterian Church of Portsmouth and he is affiliated with Ports- 
mouth Lodge No. 154, B. P. 0. E., and with the United Commercial 
Travelers. 

Matrice J. Caldwell. In November, 1912, the people of Scioto 
( -ounty chose for the office of treasurer a citizen whose fitness for such 
responsibility and honor is unquestioned and exceptional. Maurice J. 
Caldwell has been a resident of Scioto Count}' most of his life, has been 
a practical and successful farmer, has some of the finest bred cattle and 
hogs in the state, and has always been noted for his honesty and effi- 
ciency in ever,v undertaking with which his name has been connected. 

Mr. Caldwell, who was born on a farm in Valley Township of Scioto 
County, ^lareh 29, 1876, represents two prominent old families in this 
county and in Ohio, both the Caldwells and the Claypools, being people 
of more than ordinary prominence. Ilis great-grandfather. Smiley 
Caldwell, was left an orphan at an early age, was reared among stran- 
gers, aaid in early manhood came to Ohio and became identified with 
the early settlement of the state, living for a time in Jackson County. 
Mild moving thence to Ross County, where he purchased land near 
Richmond Dale, and devoted many years to clearing the farm and 
cultivating it. Successful to a more than ordinary degree, he acquired 
other lands, and continued to live on the old homestead until his death, 
lie married a widow, Mrs. Eve (Ridenour) ]McNeil, who had four 
children by her first husband. By her marriage to Mr. Caldwell there 
were four children, Jacob. Edwin, Sarah J. and George. Captain 
Jacob Caldwell, grandfather of the Scioto County treasurer, was born 
near Richmond Dale, in Ross County, Ohio, acquired his early education 
in that vicinity, and for a time was a student in the Ohio Wesleyan 
Univei*sity at Delaware. Following his marriage he located in Valley 
Township of Scioto County, and he and his brother Edwin bought land 
there and were partners in general farming and stock-raising enter- 
lu-isc. Captain Jacob Caldwell in 1862 enlisted in the Ninety-first Regi- 
ment of Ohio Volunteer Infantry and was commissioned a captain of 
Company I. He went to the front with his regiment, and gave up his 



816 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

life during his service, his death occurring at Frederick, Maryland, 
August 9, 1864. His remains were brought home and buried on his 
father's farm. Captain Caldwell married Huldah Hurd, who was 
born in Ohio, her parents being natives of Connecticut and early set- 
tlers in the Ohio Western Reserve. After the death of her soldier 
husband she married Lewis Reese, lived a few years in Oregon, and 
then returned to Ohio and spent her last days with her children. She 
reared three children: Smiley Anson, Huldah J. and Robert Brooks. 

Smiley Anson Caldwell, father of IMaurice J., was born on the old 
farm in Valley Township, where his son was also born. The birth of 
the father occurred March 15, 1853. His education was acquired by 
attendance at the district schools of Valley Township, and following the 
death of his father he made his home with his grandparents in Pike 
County and was also a student in the Ohio College at Athens. At the 
age of twenty he returned to the homestead and later succeeded to its 
ownership, and for many years was actively and successfully identified 
with farming and stock raising. In 1905 he removed to Chillicothe, 
and now lives in that city retired. 

In 1874 Smiley A. Caldwell married Nancy Jane Claypool, who was 
born in Fairfield County. The Claypools are a family now well known 
in different states of America, where they have lived for many gen- 
erations, and originally their home was in Waldrum Park, Northamp- 
tonshire, England. James Claypool, one of the ancestors, was granted 
a coat of arms on June 17, 1583. One John Claypool married Elizabeth, 
a daughter of Oliver Cromwell. A brother of John, James, witnes.sed 
the signature of William Penn to the charter of Pennsylvania. The 
family was founded in America by James Claypool, who was born Feb- 
ruary 16, 1701, and died October 9, 1789. On coming to America lie 
settled near Moorefield in Hardy County, on the south branch of the 
Potomac River, in Virginia. Hardy County was a part of Western 
Virginia, which many years later was established as the State of West 
Virginia. James Claypool, a son of the emigrant, was l)orn December 
1, 1730, in Hardy County, and died August 11, 1811. Tlie maiden name 
of his wife was ^largaret Dunbar. They had nine daughters and tliree 
sons. Of these, Jacob Claypool, who was the great-great-grandfather 
of Maurice J. Caldwell, was born in Hardy County, Virginia, March 
17, 1775, acquired a good education, and became a long surveyor. He 
came to the new State of Ohio in 1805, bought land in the locality 
known as Yankeetown in Fairfield County, and in 1808 moved liis I'miii- 
ily to that locality. They were among the earliest of the peniiancnt 
settlers in the county. In the midst of the wilderness was erected a 
substantial he-wed-log house, and the family at once took a prominent 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 817 

part in the development of the country and as influential factors in 
social life. During the first twenty years Jacob Claypool spent much 
of his time in surveying. His superior education and fine mind soon 
gave him a leading position in the county, and he was identified witli 
some of the larger business activities of that locality. On the organiza- 
tion of the Lancaster Bank in 1816 he was elected a director. In the 
same year he was elected a representative to the State Legislature and 
re-elected in 1818 and held office until 1822, and in 1824 was chosen 
a member of the Ohio State Senate. He was one of Fairfield County 's 
first citizens to drive cattle to eastern markets, and continued in that 
business until a short time before his death. He was a man of unusual 
business capacity, honest and correct in all his dealings, and left a 
name which will always be esteemed by his descendants. He was a 
member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Judge Claypool married 
^largaret Baker, and they had three daughters and six sons. The father 
of Nancy J. Claypool was Isaac Claypool, a son of the Jacob Claypool 
just mentioned. Isaac was. born January 29, 1821, succeeded to the 
ownership of the old home farm in Fairfield County, and possessing 
the same business integrity and enterprise of his father, continued to 
increase his possessions until his land holdings comprised upwards of 
six hundred acres, thoroughly equipped, with improvements that made 
the farm one of the best in the entire county. That was his home until 
his death at a good old age. Isaac Claypool married Nancy Mason, who 
was the mother of Nancy Jane Claypool. She was born January 22, 
1821, a daughter of John Mason, and died October 16, 1855. For his 
second wife Isaac Claypool married Sarah A. Pierce, of Dover, New 
Hampshire, and also had a third wife, Annie E. Cosgrove. 

Maurice J. Caldwell was one of four children, the other three being 
Earl Claypool, Beatrice and Annie M. When he was twelve years of 
age his mother died, and after that he lived in Denver with an aunt 
and attended the city schools. Graduating from the high school, he 
took a course in the Central Business College of Denver, and with that 
preparation returned home and became associated with his father in 
farming and stock raising. After the removal of his father to Chilli- 
cothe, about ten years ago, he became sole manager of the estate and 
has continued it until the present time, branching out into new activi- 
ties and becoming known all over Southern Ohio for his advanced enter- 
prise as a stockman. The profitable features of his business are the 
raising of thoroughbred cattle, hogs and horses. His favorite breed of 
cattle is the Aberdeen Angus, of which he has tlie largest herd of thor- 
oughbreds in Scioto County. He also lias a number of Duroc Jei'sey 
hogs. 



818 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Mr. Caldwell was married in 1904 to Beatrice Cenci Tatje. She 
was born in Lancaster, Fairfield County, Ohio, a daughter of Oliver 
and Mollie (Downey) Tatje, ^both natives of Ohio, while her father 
was of early French stock. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell have two sons: 
Herbert T. and J. Maurice. 

Mr. Caldwell cast his first presidential vote for William McKinley, 
and has been one of the steady supporters of the party up to the present 
time. As a capable business man he has naturally been prominent in 
his home locality, served as trustee of Valley Township, and in 1912 
was accorded the important honor of election to the office of county 
treasurer. Mr. and Mrs. Caldwell are members of the Methodist Church, 
and he is affiliated with Lucasville Lodge of the Masons and with River 
City Camp No. 129, Woodmen of the World. 

Ephbaim W. Smith. P^lected sheriff of Scioto County in November, 
1914, by the largest majority ever given for a candidate for this office 
in the history of the county, Mr. Smith needs no further voucher for 
the confidence and esteem here reposed in him, and his administration 
tliroughout is certain to justify the popular choice whicli brought to 
him this important official preferment. 

Mr. Smith was born at Oak Hill, Jackson County, Ohio, on the 27th 
of June, 1868, and is a son of William E. and Eliza Ellen (Allen) 
Smith, the former of whom was born in Kenton County, Kentucky, on 
the 20th of June, 1833, and the latter of whom was born in Jackson 
County, Ohio, in 1846, her death having occurred at the old home in 
Oak Hill, on the 27th of May, 1901, and her husband having there 
passed away on the 28th of March, 1901. They became the parents of 
seventeen children, of whom ten sons and two daughters are living, 
namely: Mary C, Joseph R., ]Sphraim W., Loren 0., James C, Ruther- 
ford A., Ottie Warren, Thomas G., Louden E., Ceola E., Austin L. and 
Cassius O. 

William E. Smith was a son of Ephraim W. Smith, who was born 
in the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and who was there reared 
and educated. From tlie old Keystone State Ephraim W. Smith 
removed to Keiiton County, Kentucky, where he was engaged in farm- 
ing until 1851, when he removed with his family to Scioto County, Ohio, 
and established his residence in Portsmouth. He was soon afterward 
ajipointed a member of the police force of the city and he held this 
jiosition until his deatli. a few years later. William E. Smith was 
iiidel)ted to the public schools of Kenton County, Kentucky, for his 
early educational discipline and was about eighteen years of age at 
the time of the family removal to Scioto County, Ohio. Here he found 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 819 

employment as a boatman on the Ohio Canal and he continued to he 
thus engaged until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he laid aside 
the labors of peace to tender his services in defense of the Union. On 
the llth of November, 1861, he enlisted in Battery L, First Ohio Light 
Artillery, and the history of this gallant command is virtually the 
record of his military cai'eer, for he participated in the various cam- 
paigns and battles in which his regiment was involved and made a 
record that will give lasting honor to his memory. Among the more 
important engagements in which he took part may be mentioned the 
following: Front Royal. Port Republic, Antietam, Fredericksburg, 
Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Rapahannock Ford, New Hope Church, 
Winchester, Fisher's Hill and Cedar Creek. He continued with his com- 
mand until victory had crowned the Union arms and received his honor- 
able discharge on the llth of July, 1865, at Columbus, Ohio. In later 
Aeare his abiding intei'est in his former comrades was shown by his 
active afifiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic, and in politics 
he was an ardent supporter of the cause of the republican party. 

Sheriff Smith, Avhose popularity is attested by the fact that he is 
familiarly known as "Pete" Smith, made good use of the advantages 
afforded in the public schools of his native village, but while still a mere 
boy he gained experience in practical affairs, through being employed 
in a brickyard in his home county. He acipiired a thorough knowledge 
of all details of this line of industry and in April, 1896, he came to 
Portsmouth, where he was employed for a few months in a brickyard. 
He then engaged with the Portsmouth Stove & Range Company, with 
which he remained eight years. He was then appointed a member of 
the city's police force, a position in which his grandfather had previ- 
ously served in this city when it was little more than a village, and he 
continued a valued member of the department for a period of four and 
one-half years. For one year thereafter he was in the employ of the 
local telephone company and thereafter he gave one year to service with 
the street railway and electric light company. In January, 1911, largely 
as a result of his excellent service on the police force, he was appointed 
deputy sheriff of the county, and of this office he continued the incum- 
bent until January, 1915, when he entered upon the discharge of his 
duties as county sheriff, a position to which he had been elected in the 
preceding November, as already noted in this context. 

Sheriff Smith has ever been a loyal and unwavering advocate of 
the principles and policies for which the republican party stands 
sponsor, and his first presidential vote was cast for Benjamin Harrison. 
He and his wife hold membership in the United Brethren Church, as 
did also his parents, and in the time-honored Masonic fraternity his 



820 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

affiliations are with Aurora Lodge No. 48, Free and Accepted Masons. 
At Portsmouth he is identified also with River City Camp No. 3993, 
Modern Woodmen of America ; River City Aerie No. 57, Fraternal Order 
of Eagles; Portsmouth Chapter No. 11, American Insurance Union ; and 
with the organization of the Order of Owls and the Loyal Order of 
Moose. 

On the 13th of May, 1888, Mr. Smith wedded Miss PriscilUi J. 
Leonard, who was born and reared in Jackson County, and who was a 
daughter of John and Sarah Leonard. She was summoned to the life 
eternal on the 13th of September, 1907, and is survived by five children, 
Elmer E., Earl L., Ottie Floyd, and Martha M. and IMargaret M., who 
are twins. 

On the 16th of November, 1910, was solemnized the marriage of 
Mr. Smith to Mrs. Mary Shackelford, who was born in AVolfe County, 
Kentucky, and who is a daughter of Noah and Elizabeth (Hobl)s,) 
Williams. No children have been born of this marriage. 

Roy C. Lynn. Occupying a position of prominence among the 
rising young business men of Scioto County is Roy C. Lynn, of Ports- 
mouth, who has made a thorough study of sanitary science and embalm- 
ing, and as an undertaker has won an extended reputation throughout 
this section of Ohio. A native of Scioto County, he was born Septemhcr 
27, 1886, on a farm lying one mile from Clifford, that having been 
likewise the birthplace of his father, William J. IMcAuley. His paternal 
grandparents, James and ]\Iary (Cockerel) McAuley, were pioneer 
settlers of Scioto County, where they bought a tract of heavily timljcn^l 
land, from which they cleared and improved a farm. 

Inheriting the parental homestead, William McAuley c-ontinucd in 
the free and independent occupation of an agriculturist until 1907, wlien 
he sold the old home farm and removed to Ileber, Wasatch County, Utah, 
where he now owns and operates a flour mill. He inain-ied first Minnie 
Cutlip, a daughter of George Cutlip, a Scioto County farmer, who lived 
to the venerable age of ninety-one years. She died in 1888, leaving two 
children, namely : Una May, wife of Wesley Stenishorn, of Scioto- 
ville; and Roy C, the special subject of this sketch. 

But eighteen months old when his mother died, Roy C. INIcAult-y w as 
legally adopted by Trustom and Susan (McAuley) Lynn, who gave 
him their name and carefully reared him. Acquiring his preliminary 
education in the city schools, Mr. Lynn was graduated from Clai'kc's 
College of Embalming, at Cincinnati, on May 28, 1905. Deeply inter- 
ested in his chosen work, and anxious to add in every possible way to 
his professional knowledge and efficiency, he subsequently took a cours*? 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 821 

of study at the Barnes School of Anatomy, Sanitary Science and 
Embalming, from which he was gi-aduated March 9, 1908. On IMay 
20, 1908, Mr. Lynn was granted a license as undertaker and embaliner 
by the State of Ohio, and on December 9, 1912, received a similar 
license from the State of Kentucky. He lias a well-appointed office in 
Portsmouth, a showroom, a morgue, and a mortuary chapel, and also 
an auto ambulance, his undertaking establishment being the best and 
most thoroughly equipped of any to be found in Southern Ohio. 

Mr. Lynn married, July 5, 1906, Mary Ann Reinhardt, who was 
born in Portsmouth, a daughter of John N. Reinhardt, and they had 
one child, Janet Marie Lynn, who died September 9, 1915. Religiously, 
both Mr. and Mrs. Lynn belong to the Presbyterian Church. Fratei'- 
nally Mr. Lynn is a member of Portsmouth Camp No. 3993, Modern 
Woodmen of America; of Portsmouth Court No. 109, Tribe of Beu 
Hur; of River City Camp No. 29, Woodmen of the World; of the Order 
of Owls; and of the Loyal Order of Moose. 

Hon. Albert Clifton Thompson. In the annals of Scioto County 
no name shines with brighter luster than that of the late Hon. Albert 
Clifton Thompson, of Portsmouth, who, during the Civil war, won 
distinction as a brave soldier, later becoming prominent in legal circles, 
and as a member of Congress proving himself an able and influential 
legislator, ever faithful to the interests not only of his constituents, 
but to those of county, state and nation. A son of John J. Y. Thomj)son, 
he was born January 23, 1842, at Brookville, Jefferson County, Penn- 
sylvania. 

John J. Y. Thompson learned the trade of a civil engineer wlien 
young, and after following that profession for a while, embarked in the 
lumber business. A man of much intelligence and ability, he was active 
in public affairs, and for several years was associate judge of Jefferson 
County. In the spring of 1865 he came to Portsmouth. Ohio, and the 
following August his death occiirred in that city. His wife, whost^ 
maiden name was Agnes Kennedey, was a daughter of Rev. William 
Kennedey, a Presbyterian clergyman. She survived him a number' of 
years, passing away at an advanced age. They were the parents of 
eight children, as follows : William Kennedey ; John J. ; Angeline ; 
Albert Clifton, the subject of this lirief biographical sketch; Clarence 
was killed at the battle of ]Manassas, in Virginia, when but seventeen 
years old; Robert M. ; Ella A.; and Edith. 

Albert C. Thompson received excellent educational advantages when 
young, after leaving the public schools continuing his studies for two 
years at Jeffersorr College, in Cannonsburg, Pennsylvairia, and at the 



822 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

breaking out of the Civil war was reading law. On April 23, 1861, 
inspired by true patriotism, he enlisted in Company I, Eighth Penn- 
sylvania A^olunteer Infantry, for three months, and being commissioned 
second sergeant of his company, served iinder command of General 
Patterson in Maryland and Virginia. On August 27, 1861, I\Ir. Tliomp- 
son re-enlisted for a term of three years in Company B, One Hundred 
and Fifth Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and was made orderly 
sergeant of his company. On October 11, 1861, he was promoted to 
the rank of second lieutenant, and on November 28, 1861, was trans- 
ferred to Company K. and commissioned captain of the. company. 

On May 21, 1862, Captain Thompson was severely wounded at the 
battle of Fair Oaks, and at the second battle of Bull Run, on August 
29, 1862, he was again wounded, a musket ball entering his right breast, 
fracturing his second and third ribs, and lodging in his lungs, where 
it remained. He suffered much, and for ten months was confined to 
his bed. In June, 1863, he entered the invalid corps, from which he 
resigned in 1864 to resume the study of law, and in the latter part of 
that year was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar. 

Coming to Ohio in 1865. Mr. Thompson began the practice of liis 
l)rofession at Portsmouth, where his a})ilities were soon recognized. In 
1869 he was elected probate .judge, and served for three years. Elected 
one of the Common Pleas .judges of the second subdivision of the Sev- 
enth Judicial District ol" Ohio in the fall of 1881, he remained in that 
position until Septem])er, 1884, when he resigned to accept the nom- 
ination of his party as a candidate for Congi-ess, to which he was elected, 
and served so efficiently that he was re-elected to the same high office 
in the forty-ninth, fiftieth and fifty-first. During his fii-st term as a 
congressman Mr. Thompson was a member of the committee on land 
claims. In the Fiftieth Congress he served upon the invalid pension 
committee. It was during the Fifty-first Congress that the ^McKinley 
tariff bill was formed, and in the construction of that important meas- 
ure Judge Thompson took no inconsiderable part, being frequently 
called upon by the party for counsel and advice. It was through the 
efforts of the Judge that the Federal Building was erected in Ports- 
mouth. The bill as passed by the Fiftieth Congress was vetoed by 
President Cleveland, but l)ecame a law liy the president's sufferance 
in the Fifty-first Congress. 

A dike, known as the Bonanza Dike, built in the Ohio River about 
that time, was provided for through the instrumentality of Judge 
Thompson, at a cost of $75,000, and in addition three ice piers were 
built just below, each one costing $7,500. The City of Portsmouth also 
received the boon of free delivery service through the same source. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 823 

After his retirement from Congress the Judge was appointed by (!ov- 
ernor McKinley chairman of the Ohio Tax Commission, which made 
its report in 1893, in the month of December. Active and prominent in 
republican ranks, Judge Thompson was chosen as a delegate to tlie 
Republican National Convention that met in St. Louis in 1896, and in 
January, 1897, he was appointed chairman of a commission created hy 
Congress to revise and codify the criminal and penal laws of the United 
States. He served ably in that capacity until appointed by President 
McKinley United States district judge for the Southern District of 
Ohio. Assuming the duties of that office on Septem))er 22. 1898. he 
continued as United States district judge until his death, January 26, 
1910. 

Judge Thompson married, December 25, 1867, Ella A. Turley, a 
daughter of John A. and Charlotte (Robinson) Turley. Of the union 
of Judge and Mrs. Thompson six children were born and reared, namely : 
Charlotte, Albert Clifton, Sara Gibbs, Amy. Guy Yansant and Ruth. 
Charlotte Thompson married Hon. Oscar W. Newman, and has one 
daughter, Katherine Newman. Albert Clifton Thompson, Jr.. enlisted, 
in 1898, for service in the Spanish-American war in tlie Thirty-first 
Regiment, Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and at the close of the war took 
a post graduate course at West Point, and is now a captain of coast 
artillery in the United States regular army. He married Gladys Fer- 
guson, of New York. Sara Gibbs Thompson married Eiistace Wheeler, 
of Baltimore, who is now engaged in the practice of law at St. Louis, 
and has one child, Carlotta Thompson Wheeler. Amy Thompson mar- 
ried Raymond D. York, and they have three children, Levi Dee York, 
Albert Thompson York and Ruth A. York. Guy Vansant Thompson 
married Rose Smith, of St. Louis, and their only child, a son, is named 
Albert Clifton Thompson. Ruth Thompson, the youngest child, is at 
home with her mother. Judge Thompson was for many years a memlier 
of the Loyal Legion of Ohio, and served as its commander. 

Joshua Vansant Robinson, Sr. For nearly four decades in the 
early history of Portsmouth Joshua Vansant Robinson, Sr., was actively 
identified with the development and advancement of the material inter- 
ests of the city, and he will ever be gratefully remembered as one who 
contributed in no small measure toward the progress and growing pros- 
perity of this section of Scioto County. Of Quaker parentaj^ie. lu' was 
born October 18, 1790, in Belvidere, New Jersey, where lie was l)red 
and educated. 

In early manhood, being impressed with the many resources of tlie 
great Northwest, Mr. Robinson came to Ohio, and after living for a 



824 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

time in Evansville, located in Cincinnati. In 1829 he took up his resi- 
dence in Portsmouth, then a town with neither railroad nor canal. 
Opening a wholesale dry goods store on Second Street, he was success- 
fully engaged in business until his death, January 8, 1865. 

Unusually energetic and progressive, Mr. Robinson was ever among 
the foremost in the establishment of enterprises conducive to the welfare 
of the city, and was not only active in business, but held a place of 
prominence among the more influential citizens. He was president of 
the old Commercial Bank when it was loeated on Second Street, below 
Market Street, and, in 1845, when the bank ceased, Mr. Robinson, Sam- 
uel M. Tracy and Charles A. M. Damarin were appointed trustees to 
Avind up the affairs of the defunct institution. The Bank of Ports- 
mouth, a branch of the State Bank, was its successor, with Mr. Robinson 
as its first president. He was one of the prime movers in securing the 
building of the Hocking & Scioto Valley Railroad, now the Portsmouth 
branch of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway. He negotiated the loans in 
the eastern cities, and did much else to further the enterprise, proving 
himself so eminently capable and efficient that on the completion of 
the road, in 1849, he was made president of the company. 

]\Ir. Robinson was a pioneer in the iron industry, which for many 
years stood pre-eminent in the state, having been at the head of the 
enterprising firm of Robinson & Glidden, proprietors of the old Scioto 
Furnace. In his later years his sons were associated with him in busi- 
ness, and in addition to owning and operating the Union Mills, they 
operated a distillery, for many years buying the entire corn crop of 
the Scioto Valley. Mr. Robinson and his sons likewise operated a 
foundrA- and a mammoth tannery at Springville, Kentucky, and during 
the '40s and early '50s were engaged in steamboating on the Ohio River, 
building for the river trade several large steamboats. While operating 
the Union Mills property they built the suspension bridge that crossed 
the Scioto at Second Street, and also the towpath pike leading from 
the bridge to the mill, having received permission to do so from the 
State Legislature. 

Mr. Robinson married Hannah Cooper, who was born in Philadel- 
phia, on Chestnut Street, of Quaker parents, and who was a cousin of 
James Fenimore Cooper, the celebrated author and novelist. She died 
one year before her husband. They reared eight children, namely: 
Lucien Newton ; Joshua V., Jr. ; Lewis Cooper ; Cornelia, who married 
Wells A. Hutchins; Charlotte, who became the wife of Col. John A. 
Turley: Mary Ellen, who married Daniel A. Glidden; Camelia; and 
Charles PTenrv. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 825 

Samuel A. Williams. One of tlie fine old characters of a genera- 
tion that is now a past was the late Samuel A. Williams, who lived for 
man\- years in Scioto County and whose descendants are still repre- 
sented among the honorable and successful citizenship of this locality. 

Samuel A. AVilliams was born in Bath County, Kentucky, February 
20, 1807. His father, Capt. William A. Williams, was born in England 
November 16, 1774, as a boy began the life of a sailor and rose to the 
captaincy of a vessel. Finally retiring from the sea, he came to America 
and on May 8, 1805, married Harriet L. Forrest. She, too, was a native 
of England and a daughter of a wealthy sea captain, but at the time 
of her marriage was visiting the family of Judge Salter in the United 
States. After their marriage Captain Williams and wife located on a 
farm in Bath County, Kentucky, and that was their home until death. 
Captain Williams died March 20, 1845. 

Samuel A. Williams, who Avas one of several children, was reared 
and educated in Kentucky, and in young manhood moved to Ports- 
mouth, Avhere he was emploj^ed in the Gaylord Rolling Mill until after 
the breaking out of the Civil war. He was more than fifty years of age 
when the war came on, and was therefore not subject to duty. How- 
ever, he enlisted in Company B of the Seventy-third Regiment of Ohio 
A'olunteer Infantry, went to the front, and remained in the service until 
his honorable discharge on account of disability. After his return from 
tlie army he continued a resident of Portsmouth until his death on 
November 1, 1871, at the age of sixty-nine. 

Samuel A. Williams married Mrs. Sidney A. (Huston) Anderson. 
She will alwaj'S have a special distinction in the historj^ of the City of 
Portsmouth, since she is credited with having been the first white girl 
child bora on the site of that city, August 7, 1808. Her parents were 
William and Susanna (Boyd) Huston, a family that is sketched else- 
where in this work. Mrs. Williams died December 8, 1892. She had 
one child by her first marriage, Eliza A. Anderson, now deceased. 
I\Ir. and Mrs. Williams reared six children : Maria L., William IL, 
Susanna H., Cyrus Brooks, John M. and Samuel Vinton. Three of the 
sons, William H., John M. and Cyrus B., all saw service in the Civil 
war, and the two first are the subjects of special sketches found else- 
whei'e in this publication. The son Cyrus Brooks enlisted with his 
father in Company B of tlie Seventj^-third Regiment of Ohio Infantry, 
went to the front, and after nearly a year was lionorably discharged 
on acount of disability. Returning home and recuperating, he again 
enlisted, this time in the One Hundred and Seventeenth Regiment of 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, a regiment that subsequently became the First 
Ohio Heavy Artillery. After his second enlistment he again went to 



826 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

the front and remained with his command until the close of the war. 
An honorable discharge was followed by return to Portsmouth and some 
years later he went West and died in Denver, Colorado, a few yeai's 
ago. 

Captain William Huston Williams. AVhile his country needed his 
services on the battlefields of the South, Captain William H. Williams 
was a gallant soldier with an Ohio regiment, having enlisted from Ports- 
mouth, the home of his childhood and early youth. Since the war Cap- 
tain Williams has been a successful and thrifty business man, and has 
enjoyed many tokens of esteem and evidence of the confidence of his 
fellow citizens in various public offices. 

Captain William Huston Williams was born in the City of Ports- 
mouth August 27, 1840, and was the oldest son of Samuel A. and Sidney 
(Huston) Williams, worthy pioneers whose careers are sketched on 
other pages of this work. William H. Williams was educated in the 
Portsmouth schools, and on July 16, 1861, before he had reached his 
twenty-first birthday, enlisted in Company A of the 39th Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry. This regiment, according to Evans' History; had more 
re-enlisted veterans than any other regiment from Ohio, and saw as 
much hard service if not more and was in more battles than any regi- 
ment ever formed in Scioto County. In December, 1863, Captain 
Williams re-enlisted, and was with his command in all its various 
marches, campaigns and battles, and a full account of the regiment's 
services would include a general account of the war, especially in the 
Mississippi Valley and in the critical campaigns through Georgia and 
North and South Carolina and Tennessee. Captain Williams partici- 
pated in the battles of New Madrid, Missouri, Island No. 10, luka and 
Corinth in Mississippi, Parker's Cross Roads in Tennessee, and was with 
Sherman's Command in all the engagements from Chattanooga to 
Atlanta, and also in the siege and capture of that city. Following the 
fall of Atlanta he accompanied Sherman's victorious army on the march 
to the sea, entered the City of Savannah on Christmas Day of 1864, 
thence proceeded through the Carolinas and was present at Johnston's 
surrender near Raleigh, arriving an hour before he surrendered. Cap- 
tain Williams was then placed in charge of the regimental l)aggage and 
went by rail to Moorehead, North Carolina, thence by boat to Washington, 
and arrived in the capital in time to witness the grand review of tlie vic- 
torious hosts of the Union army. He went with his regiment to Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, and was honorably discharged in July, 1865, after 
having seen fully four years of ^tive service. After the war Captain 
Williams enlisted in Company C of the Sixth Regiment of the Oliio 



HANGING BOCK IRON REGION 827 

National Guards, and served for a number of years with the rank of 
captain. 

The war over, Captain Williams went to Nile Township in Seioto 
County and spent about five years in managing a general' store for 
Thomas Adamson. In 1877 he was elected county recorder and gave 
six years of capable and efficient management to that office. For several 
years he was a contractor on public works and held the office of deputy 
United States marshal under President Harrison for four years. He 
was also assistant sergeant of the Ohio State Senate for two terms. 
Captain Williams now lives retired. 

On October 8, 1866, Captain Williams married Nancy Aroyse, who 
died in 1869. On March 4, 1877, he married Florence Humble. She 
was born at Bladensburg, Wapello County, loM'a, June 30, 1858. Her 
father, Sylvester J. Humble, was bom in Adams County, Ohio, near 
Cedar Mills, a son of James Humble, who was a pioneer of Adams 
County, and improved a farm near Wamsleyville, on Turkey Creek, and 
lived there until his death. Sylvester J. Humble was reared and mar- 
ried in his native county, and in. 1857 joined a colony bound for wliat 
was then considered the far west. There were twenty teams in line, and 
for twenty-six days the caravan journeyed slowly to the west and finally 
reached the new state of Iowa, locating in Wapello County. The greater 
portion of the state was then uninhabited and the land was sold liy the 
Government at a price as low as $1.25 per acre. For a part of the year 
Mr. Humble was engaged in teaming to Keokuk, sixty miles distant, 
which was the nearest convenient market. He remained in Iowa two 
years, then returned to Southern Ohio and located in Nile Townslii[) of 
Scioto County. During the Civil war Sylvester Humble enlisted iu llie 
One Hundred and P^rtieth Regiment of Ohio Infantry and served until 
his honorable discharge. His last days were spent in Portsmouth. Syl- 
vester Humble married Melissa F. ^Mott, who was born in Adams County. 
Ohio, a daughter of Henry Mott, who was ])orn in Pennsylvania, April 
30, 1799. Henry ]\Iott was a son of Robert Mott, who was probably a 
native of Pennsylvania, moved from there to the State of Illinois and 
became an early settler in the ^Mississippi River valley, in Hardin County, 
and lived there until his death. ^Ir. ]\Iott was only a youth when the 
family moved to Illinois and at an early age left home and engaged iu 
boating up and down the Mississippi and Ohio rivers, operating keel 
boats. Later he settled in Adams County. Ohio, and lived near Sandy 
Springs a few years, then came to Scioto County, bought land in lower 
Nile Township, twelve miles from Portsmouth, and after thirteen years 
as a farmer there sold out and returned to Hardin County, Illinois, lived 
there seven years and finally returned to Scioto County and lived in 



828 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Nile Township until his death on August 24, 1846. Henry Mott married 
Phcbe WoodiT-ifle. She was born in Philadelphia, IMareh 22, 1801, a 
daughter of Benjamin Franklin WoodrufiE, who was a native of Pennsyl- 
vania and served with the rank of lieutenant in the War of 1812. In 
1817 Lieutenant Woodruff moved out to Ohio, accompanied by his family, 
making the entire journey overland with ox teams and wagons. The 
Woodruffs located near Sandy Springs in Adams County and that was 
his home until his death. His remains are buried in the Sandy Springs 
Cemetery. Lieutenant Woodruff married Jane Sheppard. She was born 
in Pennsylvania in 1776 and spent her last years in Adams County, 
Ohio. Henry j\Iott and wife reared nine children : Albina J., Albanus, 
Almira, Jasper, Melissa, Alvin, William, Phebe, and Clarissa. 

]\Ir. and Mi*s. Williams are the parents of ten living children : Minnie 
I., Susan A., Hazel K., Huston S., Ethel I., Frank S., William J. S., 
Cary McKinley, Russell D. and Carol. Mr. and Mrs. Williams are mem- 
bers of the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church of Portsmouth. Cap- 
tain Williams is a member of the G. A. R. He was at one time com- 
mander of his post and at the same time was also commander of the 
Sons of Veterans. 

Sampson D. Eckiiart. By their votes in 1914 the people of Scioto 
County placed in the office of county auditor a man whose thorough fit- 
ness for official responsibility no one might successfully question. Until 
this new honor came to him, Mr. Eckhart had been an educator, in 
scliool work since the age of nineteen, and many of his early pupils 
helped elect him. He has almost as many personal friends over the 
county as he had votes in the election. 

Sampson D. Eckhart was born on a farm in Madison Township Feb- 
ruary 16, 1876. His father is Jacob A. Eckhart, one of the county's 
substantial citizens, who was born in Ohio, August 7, 1843. Grand- 
Father Jacob Eckhart, a native of Hanover, Germany, where he was 
reared and educated, came to America to win a home, crossing the ocean 
in a sailing vessel, and l>ecame an early resident of Jackson County. 
His wife was Mary Sherer, and they reared twelve of their family of 
fourteen children. Four of the sons, George, Adam, John and Jacob, 
all became soldiers and made good records in the Civil war. 

Jacob A. Eckhart, one of the surviving veterans of the war, grew up 
on a farm in Madison Township, attended rural schools, and was still 
under age when hostilities broke out between the states. August 13, 
1862. he enlisted in Company K of the Ninetj^-firet Ohio Infantry, and 
going to the front, participated with his command in a number of cam- 
paifrns and engagements. At Stevenson's Depot, Virginia, he was 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 829 

SL'verelj' wounded in the right hip. This fight occurred July 20, 1864, 
and he was sent to the Maryland Heights Hospital, where he remained 
three months. He never sufficiently recovered for active service, but 
was not discharged until May 6, 1865, at Cumberland, Maryland. Two 
years after his return home the bullet was extracted from his body, and 
it is now kept as a relic of the war. As soon as he was able to apply 
himself to the serious business of life, he bought forty acres adjoining 
the old homestead, and biiilt a house which he occupied for a number of 
years. He finally removed to the old homestead to care for his parents, 
and eventually succeeded to its ownership. In 1900 he moved into 
Sciotoville, and in the same year was appointed village postmaster, an 
office he held for several years. In December, 1865, he married Jemima 
Bussler, a daughter of Samuel Bussler. The eight children of their 
marriage were : Daniel, who died when fourteen years old, the result 
of an accident; George, who died at the age of nineteen; John; jMinnie, 
wife of J. W. Coriell ; Maggie, deceased wife of Dr. Samuel Rickey ; 
Sampson D. ; Andrew J. ; and Bertha. 

Professor Eckhart takes much satisfaction in the fact that his youth 
was spent in the wholesome environment of the country. His schooling 
was liegini in district schools, and advanced by attendance at the normal 
schools of both Scioto and Jackson counties. His career as a teacher 
liegan at the age of nineteen, and he has some interesting and pleasant 
recollections of his first term, taught at Glade in Scioto township of 
Jackson County. Tlien followed three years in the Shiner school in 
tlie same township, and the next year in the Providence school in the 
same locality. In 1900 he came to Portsmouth and for two years was 
connected witli the Micklethwait school, and after that was continuously 
in charge of the New Boston school until he entered upon his duties at 
the court house. 

In August. 1900, ]\Ir. Eckhart married Stella Frances Gahm. She 
was bom in Scioto Township of Jackson County, a daughter of Adam 
and Maggie Gahm. Mr. and IMrs. p]ckhart have two daughters, Marie 
and Garnet. 

Politically, j\lr. Eckhart cast his fii'st vote for Major IMcKinley, and 
lias never wavered in his support of republican principles. He is a mem- 
ber of the General Jacob Camp No. 26, Sons of Veterans, and of Ives 
Lodge, Kiiights of Pythias, at Ilarrisonville. His parents are members 
of .the United Bretliren Church, but he and his wife have membership 
ill the Baptist denomination. 

\Vii>i,nM B. Ri(;ii.\HnsoN. In his iuitiv(> city of Portsnionlii. 1h(> 
tnctropolis of the Hanging Rock Iron Region. ^Ir. Ricliai-dson lias liecii 



830 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

engaged in the practice of law since 1895 and he has worthily and 
effectively achieved his secure place as one of the representative nieiu- 
bers of the bar of Scioto County, his father having become a resident 
of this county more than sixty years ago and the fanjily name having 
been closely identified with the civic and material interests of the City 
of Portsmouth during the long intervening years. 

William B. Richardson was born and reared in Portsmouth and the 
public schools of this city afforded him his early educational advantages. 
He is a son of James and JMary (Orme) Richardson, the latter of whom 
was born and reared in Scioto County, a daughter of Johii and Phylnra 
(Hay ward) Orme, concerning whom more definite mention is made on 
other pages of this publication. James Richardson was born in Connly 
Monaghan, Ireland, a son of Robert and Martha (Mcl)onakl) Richard- 
son, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Scotland, the 
paternal ancestry likewise having been of Scottish origin. Robert Rich- 
ardson and wife continued their residence in County ^Monaghan of the 
Emerald Isle until their death and his vocation was that of farming. 
James Richardson was reared and educated in his native land and there 
he wedded Miss Margaret Simmons, whose sister Jane became the wife 
of James Connolly, long a representative l)usiness man of Portsmouth, 
Ohio. Mrs. Richardson died in 1860, at Portsmouth. 

In 1847 James Ricliardson and his wife immigrated to America, and 
on the voyage, which was made on a sailing vessel, they were accom- 
panied by their four children. After having been on the ocean six 
weeks they landed in New York city on the 4th of July of that year. 
Soon afterward the family home was established at Lansingburg, Rens- 
selaer County, that state, where I\Ir. Richardson found employment in 
a brush factory and whei'e he reniaiiied until 1858, when lie came with 
his family to Ohio, the journey to Cincinnati having been made by rail- 
road and from that city transportation to Portsmouth, Scioto County, 
having been made by packet boat on the Ohio River. After i)roviding 
a comfortable home in Portsmouth. Jatnes Richardson {issumcd the posi- 
tion of paymaster for his brother-in-law, James Connolly. i)reviously 
mentioned, the latter"having been at the time tlie civil enginefi- in charge 
of the construction of the Scioto & Hocking Valley Railroad. Jii 185() 
iMr. Richardson engaged in the retail grocery business in J'ortsmoutli, 
liis establishment having been at the corner of Chillicothe and Fifth 
streets, and his ability, enterprise and honorable methods enabled him 
to acliieve unqualified success in this business. As his financial I'esonrces 
increased ho made .jiidicious iiivestiiicnls in city and farm ])i'0]ierty. and 
in 1875 he retired from the grocery business, after which Iv- gMve his 
attention to the supervision of his real estate nnd to the directing of the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 831 

affairs of his farms until his death, which occurred at Portsmouth in the 
year 1908. He was a man of strong personality, inflexible integrity and 
genial and buoyant disposition, so tliat he retained an inviolable place 
in the confidence and esteem of the community which represented his 
home for many years. After the death of his first wife was solemnized 
the marriage of James Richardson to Miss Mary Jane Orme, who still 
maintains her home at Portsmouth, the five children of the second mar- 
riage who are still living being James, Jr., Anna V., Florence A., William 
B., and Aldred IT. The elder daughter, Anna V., is now the wife of 
Jolm A. Ives. 

AVilliam P. Richardson attended the public schools of Portsmouth 
until he had completed the curriculum of the high school, and in prepa- 
ration for his chosen profession he entered the Cincinnati Law School, 
in which he was graduated as a member of the class of 1895 and from 
which he received the degree of Bachelor of Laws. From that time to 
the present he has been engaged in the general practice of his profession 
in Portsmouth, where he has long retained a substantial and representa- 
tive clientage and where he has appeared in connection with nuich im- 
portant litigation, his success affording the most effective voucher for 
his ability as an advocate and counselor and indicating also his posses- 
sion of those sterling characteristics that ever beget popular confidence 
and est^^em. He has an excellent law business and is one of the leading 
members of the Scioto County bar. On the 1st of January, 1914, he 
was appointed by the mayor, Adam Friek, as a director of public service. 

From the time of attaining to his legal majority "Sir. Richardson has 
accorded unfaltering allegiance to the democratic party, his first presi- 
dential vote having been cast in support of William Jennings Bryan. 
Though he has manifested no ambition for public office and considered 
his profession worthy of his undivided fealty, he has taken a loyal inter- 
est in piiblic affairs and has given effective service in the furtheranee 
of the })rinciples of the political party with which he is identified. In a 
fraternal way ^Ir. Richardson is affiliated with Aurora Lodge, No. 48, 
Free & Accepted Masons; Blount Vernon Chapter, No. 23, Royal Arch 
]\Iasons; and 3IcPherson Council, No. 307, Royal Arcanum. 

Hon. A^■SEL.^r Tui'pkr Holcomb. A man of versatile talents, and 
sou nil judgment, Hon. Anselm Tupper Holcomb, one of the foremost 
citizens of Portsmouth, has achieved marked success in many lines of 
endeavor, as a lawyei- winning high prestige; as a business man being 
eminently succ(>ssful : and as a public official iising his influence at all 
times to promote the welfare of city, county and state. A native of Ohio, 
he Avas bom November 19, 1845, in Vinton, Gallia County, a son of 



832 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

John Ewing Holcomb, and grandson of Gen. Samuel R. Ilolconib. His 
great grandfather, Zephaniah Holeombe, was born in Columbia County, 
New York, coming from honorable New England ancestry. vHe enlisted 
as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and died in the service in 1778. 

Gen. Samuel R. Holcomb was born near Spencertown, Columbia 
County, New York. But an infant when his father entered the Revo- 
lutionary army, he went to live with his paternal grand pai-ents, with 
whom he remained until eighteen years of age. Going then to Virginia, 
he settled in Greenbrier County, where he wooed and married Sarali 
Ewing. Following the march of civilization westward in 1800, he located 
in Gallia County, Ohio, a part of the Northwestern Territory. At that 
time all of the country west of the Ohio River was known as the North- 
west Territory, and was inhabited by Indians, who, with the buffalo, 
wild turkeys, wolves, and bears roamed at will through the vast forests. 
A man of strong individuality, he soon became prominent in public 
affairs, serving as sheriff seventeen consecutive years, and also represent- 
ing his district in 1825 and 1835 in the State Legislature. He continued 
a resident of Gallia County until his death, in the ninety-first yi'ar of 
his age. He served in the AVar of 1812, on the staff of General Tup[)er, 
and as a ma.jor-general of the State Militia. The maiden name of tiie 
wife of Gen. Sanuiel R. Holcomb was Sarah Ewing. She was born iti 
Virginia, which was likewise the birthplace of her father, John Ewing. 
A lad of fourteen years at the time of the Clendenin massacre, he was 
taken prisoner by the Indians, held captive for many years, near Circle- 
ville, Ohio, and was afterwards known far and wide as Indian Jolni 
Ewing. Late in life he came to Ohio, aiid spent his last years in Vinloii, 
his body being laid to rest in the Vinton Cemetery. His wife's maiden 
name was Ami Smith. ^Irs. Savali i Ewing) Holi'oml) lived 1o the age 
of seventy years. 

John Ewing Ilolcoml) was reared and educated in <lallia Coiuily, 
where he carried on general farming until tliirly-llii'ce years of age. 
Embarking then in mercantile i)i;rsnits at Vinton, lie conlinucd tlio'c 
until 1869, when he removed with his family to Butler, liales County. 
^Missouri, where having purchased laud, he was engaged in llie stock and 
real estate business until his death, in 1889, in the seventy-tliird year 
of his age. His wife, whose luaiden name was jMary ^Matthews, was born 
in Cheshire, Gallia' County, Ohio. April 7. 1818, a daughter of Phincas 
Matthews, and grand-daughter of Aaron .\rattlicws, a life-long i-esidciit 
of New England. 

Phincas Matthews was born in 1770, reared and cdncalcd in l>rain- 
Iree, ^Massachusetts. Responding to the Inrr ol" the Wild West, he Joined 
the second expedition of Gen. Rnfus rutnain, and with biin niigi'atcd 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 833 

to the Northwest Territory, becoming one of the first settlers of Gallia 
County. He purchased from the Government land now included within 
the limits of Cheshire Township, Gallia County. Clearing a large tract, 
he became a most successful farmer, and one of the influential citizens 
of the place. He was tax collector of that part of Washington Counly. 
He lived on his homestead until his death, at the advanced age of eighty- 
four years. He was three times married; his second wife, Mr. Holcomb's 
maternal grandmother, Abigail Nobles, was a native of Massachusetts. 
By his first marriage Phineas IMatthews had seven children; by his 
second marriage, six children; and by his last wife, two children. Mr. 
and Mrs. John Ewing Holcomb reared six children, namely: Phineas 
H. ; Anselm T. ; Eliza S., who married Richard Wilson ; Sarah, wife of 
John C. Bybee; Charles M. ; and Sumner C. All of these children are 
living now, in June, 1915. The mother survived her husband a few 
years, passing away in 1894, aged seventy-seven years. 

Anselm Tupper Holcomb received his elementary education in the 
public schools of Vinton and Ewington, during his vacations and leisure 
time assisting his father in the store. Entering the Ohio University in 
1863, he was there graduated in 1867. While pursuing his studies in 
that institution spent a part of his spare time reading law with Hon. 
Reed Golden, at Athens. After receiving his diploma, he continued his 
legal studies in the office of his uncle. Gen. Anselm Tupper Holcoml), 
in addition teaching school at Vinton and Rodney, in Gallia County, 
Ohio, and at Moorefield, Kentucky. Going to Bates County, Missouri, 
in 1868, Mr. Holcomb was admitted to the bar, and until 1875 was there 
engaged in the practice of his profession in partnership with Hon. 
William Page, the firm name being Page & Holcomb. The following 
four years he was associated with his brother Phineas in the law business. 

Coming to Portsmouth, Ohio, in 1878, Mr. Holcomb formed a part- 
nership with Hon. Albert C. Thompson, and under the firm name of 
Thompson & Holcomb was successfully engaged in the practice of his 
profession until 1881. In 1884 Mr. Holcomb became associated with 
James M. McGillivary and Judge A. C. Thompson and they opened 
offices in both Portsmouth and in Ironton. In the latter place Mr. Hol- 
comb lived for nearly two years. From 1886 until 1891 Mr. Holcoml) 
practiced alone, but was afterwards for three years in partnership with 
James M. Dawson, an able lawyer, the firm being Holcomb & Dawson 
On June 1, 1897, he formed a partnership with Frank B. Finney, with 
whom he was associated two years. An active and tireless worker, Mr. 
Holcomb has been quite successful in his various undertakings. Whil(> 
living in Bates County, ]\Iissouri, he made an abstract of title to all the 
lands in the county, and since coming to Portsmouth he has been among 



834 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

tlu" foremost in all things calculated to promote the growth and develop- 
ment of the city, and has been personally identified with many of the 
leading industries of this locality. 

INIr. Holcomb was president of the Raccoon Coal & Fuel Company; 
a director in the Vinton Coal Company ; a promoter, and the largest stock- 
holder of the Buckeye Fire Brick & Clay Company ; and was vice presi- 
dent and director of the Portsmouth Shoe Company. He is now presi- 
dent of the Portsmouth Veneer & Panel Company ; of the Walker Veneer 
& Lumber Company of IMound City, Illinois ; and recently of the Ports- 
mouth-Radford Veneer Company of Radford, Virginia. He is a director 
of the Scioto Fire Brick Company; secretary of the Fluhart Coal 
& Mining Company, of Wellston, Ohio; president of the Buekhorn Coal 
Company of Lawrence County, Ohio ; was one of the original stock- 
holders of the Portsmouth Fire Brick Company and the Wagon Stock 
Company ; one of the original promoters and director of the Portsmouth 
Street Railway & Light Company ; and also a promotor and director 
of the Portsmouth Telephone Company. He is interested in the coal 
business in Missouri, and he is also a director of the Middle Creek Coal 
Company and the Purity Cannel Coal Company, both near Prestonsburg, 
Kentucky, and of the Carroll Vehicle Company of Portsmouth. 

To the multiplicity of enterprises with which Mr. Holcomb is now 
identified, he gives personal attention. He bought, in 1896, all the lands 
of the "Scioto Furnace Company," about 7,500 acres. He still retains 
over 3,000 acres of these lands. His sales were made to small investors 
for farms. As administrator of the estate of George Davis, deceased, 
he sold nearly 3,000 acres of "The Jackson Furnace Lands," in Jackson 
County, Ohio. 

Mr. Holcomb w^as for a number of years president of the Board of 
Trade. While so acting, he inaugurated the movement to purchase sev- 
eral tracts of land adjoining Portsmouth on the east. These lands were 
purchased by donations from the citizens, and the title to same was 
vested in Mr. Holcomb, as trustee. It required hard work, and involved 
ffuite a heavy responsibility. The lands were platted and lots sold, the 
surplus being iised to induce new manufactures to locate in our city. 
It proved a great success, and with it began an era of great prosperity 
to Portsmouth, which has not since abated. He purchased and laid off 
tlie First and Second Additions of what is known as the Hill-top Addi- 
tions to Portsmouth. He and three others laid out the Kendall Addition 
to Portsmouth, and with Captain Skelton and Michael Stanton he pur- 
chased the Rhodes farm, and laid off the Village of New Boston. Grace 
Street is named for his wife. He also laid off and platted Scioto Furnace. 
Union Mills, and The Breare-Holcomb Addition to Vinton. Ohio. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 835 

Hon. Nelson W. Evans, leading attorney of Portsmouth, in his his- 
tory of Scioto County, speaks of Mr. Holcomb in the following high 
terms : " It is common-place to say Mr. Holcomb is a good lawyer. He 
is much more. He is a fluent and able advocate. He is courteous to all 
with whom he comes in contact, and is willing to accord to every man 
all he is entitled to. He is kind and sympathetic, and these traits in him 
are all taken advantage of. He is wonderfully enthusiastic in every- 
thing he undertakes. He is ever courageous and hopeful, and no more 
public-spirited citizen ever resided in Portsmouth. He favors every 
project for the public good, and possesses confidence in everything he 
undertakes, and inspires it in others." 

He has been admitted to practice, and has practiced law in all the 
courts, state and federal, except the Supreme Court of the United States. 
Mr. Holcomb has had many important trusts confided to his care. In 
1893 he became the assignee of the Citizens Savings Bank, and in 1894 
was made administrator of the estate of the late George Davis. These 
large estates have been fully settled. 

A stanch republican in politics, he was a delegate in 1876 to the 
National Convention, and has served as a delegate to many state and 
district conventions. In 1891 he was elected as a representative to the 
State Legislature, where he served as a member of the Judiciary Com- 
mittee, and on the Committee on Municipalities. He declined a re- 
election. 

On October 14, 1876, Mr. Holcomb was united in marriage with 
Grace L. Breare, who was born in Marblehead, Massachusetts. Her 
father, Rev. Robinson Breare, was born and reared in Yorkshire, Eng- 
land, of English ancestry on both sides of the house. Uniting in early 
life with the Wesleyan Methodist Episcopal Church, he became a min- 
ister in that denomination, and held pastorates in both Liverpool and 
Manchester, England, and in Edinburg, Scotland. Coming to America, 
he located in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he changed his theological 
views, becoming a preacher in the Universalist denomination. He sub- 
sequently settled in Massachusetts, and held pastorates in Boston, Mar- 
blehead and Haverhill. Moving from the latter city to Cincinnati, he 
was for some time connected with a Universalist paper, the Star in the 
West, and was later pastor of the Universalist Church at Gallipolis. 
Retiring from the ministry Mr. Breare bought a home at Wellsville, 
Vinton County, and there lived until his death, in 1882, at the age of 
seventy-two years. He married Elizabeth Clarke, who was born in Lan- 
caster, England, where her father. Rev. George Clarke, a preacher in 
the Wesleyan Methodist Episcopal Church, was a life-long resident. She 
died in 1874, leaving two children, Elizabeth and Grace L. Mr. and 



836 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Mrs. Holcomb have two children, Anselm T., Jr., a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Virginia ; and Robinson Breare. Mr. Holconib has for twenty- 
seven years been a member of the Board of Trustees of the Portsmouth 
Public Library and is now its president. Fraternally he is a member of 
Aurora Lodge, No. 48, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; 
of Mount Vernon Chapter, No. 23, Royal Arch ]\Iasons ; of Calvary Com- 
mandery No. 13, Knights Templar; of Portsmouth Lodge, No. 154, 
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and of ]\Iassie Lodge, No. 115, 
Knights of Pythias. 

Hon. Arthur John Haxnan. The vocation of railroading has 
attracted manj' young men when starting out in life, and has proven a 
field rich in opportunities for those who are willing to scorn hardships, 
face dangers and prove fidelity to the systems by which they are 
employed. The engineer knows that on his judgment, formed in the 
fraction of a second, the fate of his train may depend. The engineer's 
position is not the top of the ladder, though no place in the world's 
work has greater responsibilities. Firing and running a locomotive 
constitute one of the best vocations to develop a man's best qualities. 
It is not unusual, therefore, to find men holding high positions in business 
and public life who began their careers as hostlers and firemen. In this 
category is found Arthur John Hannan, mayor of Ironton, who but a 
few years back was to be found balancing himself on the rocking floor 
of the tender, tossing coal into the insatiable firebox, and subsequently 
handled the throttle of a powerful locomotive. Although now retired 
from railroading, owing to an accident which all railroad men may be 
called upon to face. Mayor Hannan has not forgotten the discipline of 
his early training, nor the value of the judgment which it brought. 

Arthur John Hannan was born July 26, 1880, at Ironton, Ohio, and 
is a son of John and Katie (Campbell) Hannan. His father was born 
in Lawrence County, Ohio, November 11, 1859, and is now the oldest 
conductor on the D. T. & I. Railroad, having been in actual service 
since 1878 and during this tiuip has had but one accident. Mrs. Hannan 
was born at Ironton, in 1864, and has been the mother of seven children, 
as follows : Arthur John, Carl C, Louis, Clarence, Raymond, Marjorie 
and Elsie. 

T^ntil fifteen years of age Arthur John Hannan attended the public 
and high schools of Ironton, and at that age secured a clerkship in the 
office of the Iron Railroad, where he remained six months, thus securing 
his introduction to railroading. For three months thereafter he was a 
tie inspector at the elevator of the same company, and then became a 
locomotive fireman, remaining with the Iron Railroad for 31/0 years 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 837 

in that capacity. Firemen as a rule are picked men, and have to be, 
for theirs is the most tremendous physical task of all, the increasing 
grate-area of fireboxes of big engines having brought the limit of their 
effort distressingly close. Mr. Hannan, during the time he stood on the 
heaving, pitching steel deck in front of the furnace door, showed he had 
the muscle and endurance necessary to shovel from 15 to 20 tons of 
coal in 8 to 12 hours, and when his term as fireman was completed, in 
1897, he was given an engine on the D. T. & I. Railroad. There he con- 
tinued at the throttle until 1910, when in a head-on collision, at Sand 
Cut, 11/4 miles north of Ironton, he lost one of his legs and was compelled 
to retire from the service. He was ill for seven months, and when he 
recovered was elected justice of the peace of Lawrence County, in 1911. 
During the two years that he thus acted he displayed his official and 
executive ability so well that in the fall elections of 1913 he was elected 
mayor of Ironton, taking office January 2, 1914. He has proved himself 
a capable executive, and is giving the people of his community a sane, 
progressive and business-like administration. Although his time is given 
unreservedly to his official duties, i\Iayor Hannan is interested in the 
business growth and welfare of his city, and is interested in the Marting 
Iron & Steel Co. and in the Etna Building and Loan Association of Iron- 
ton, of whic^h he is also a director. He continues to maintain membership 
in the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, and is also connected with 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Junior Order United 
American Workmen. With his family, he attends the Pine Street Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church. 

On September 19, 1900, Mr. Hannan was married at Ironton to JMiss 
Lettie Wilson, daughter of John AVilson, of this city, and four children 
have been born to this union, namely : Gerald, Arthur John, Jr., Clarence 
and William. 

John ^l. Wendelken. One of the most familiar names in business 
affairs at Portsmouth is Wendelken, and the family has had substantial 
relations with the community in various lines for many years. 

John ]\I. AVendelken, whose business is a retail grocer, manufacturer 
and in other lines has made him prominent in the city for many years, 
was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, August 26, 1850. His 
village was Wenkelmer in the District of Ottersberg. His father, Martin 
Wendelken, was born in the same village in 1823. The grandfather was 
a lifelong resident there and was identified with the transportation 
business on tlie Hanoverian canals. He reared four sons and three 
daughters. All these sons moved to America, namely : Gerd, George, 
John and .Martin, and all settled in ^Marietta, Ohio. George was a car- 



838 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

penter and followed his trade throughout his active career. Gerd was 
in merchandising at IMarietta and lived there until his death. John also 
conducted a store there a number of years and subsequently was in the 
flour mill business and after the war went West and spent his last days 
as a farmer in Dakota Territory. 

Martin Wendelken was reared and educated in his native land and 
learned the trade of carpenter. On arriving at military age he joined 
the army, and in 1850 was granted an unlimited furlough and accom- 
panied by his wife and three children came to America. The voyage 
was made in a sailing vessel, which encountered many storms, and several 
months elapsed before it landed its passengers at New Orleans. The 
Wendelken family came by way of the IMississippi and Ohio rivers as 
far as Llarietta, where Martin Wendelken worked at his trade until after 
the war and was then in the retail grocery business. In this his success 
finally brought him to the rank of a wholesale grocer, and he conducted 
business as one of the leading nierehants of Marietta until his death 
in 1902. Martin Wendelken married Adaline Kueck, who was born in 
Hanover, Germany, in 1825, the daughter of a farmer. She died in 
1896. Her six children were Anna, John INI., Henry J., Mary, Julia and 
William. 

John M. Wendelken was but nine weeks of age when his parents 
started for America. His early life was therefore altogether spent in 
Marietta, where he was educated in the public schools. When only a 
boy he began assisting his father in the store, learned all the details of 
the grocery trade, and after reaching manhood moved to Portsmouth. 
In 1874 he became identified with the grocery business at the foot of 
Second Street and built up an immense trade and was successfully iden- 
tified with that line until 1901. Selling out, he was for some time inter- 
ested in the manufacture of shoes, served two terms as a member of the 
board of public service, but at the present time is engaged in the life 
and fire insurance business. 

In September, 1873, Mr. Wendelken married Ottilia Brodbeck. She 
was born in Portsmouth. Her father, Vincent Brodbeck, was born in 
Germany, January 17, 1817, a son of Anthony Brodbeck. When eight 
years of age Vincent lost his mother, was bound out to live and serve 
in the home of an uncle, where he received little schooling but much ill 
treatment, and finally lost his health. When fourteen he hired out to 
work by the season, and in 1835, at the age of eighteen, accompanied his 
father and other members of the family to the United States. The voy- 
age lasted for fifty days on the sailing vessel Bolivar. They finally 
landed at New Orleans in November, where Vincent was employed for 
a time at the carpenter's trade at $1.75 a day. On March 1, 1836, they 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 839 

moved up the river to Natchez, where he worked a month on a railroad. 
The family then continued its migration with Troy, New York, as its 
destination, where an elder brother had been living for eighteen months. 
As they proceeded it was learned that canal communication was inter- 
rupted, and the family were thus obliged to stop at Portsmouth. There, 
on the advice of Vincent, they concluded to remain. Vincent Brodbeck 
worked for two weeks with the firm of McDowell, Davis & Company, 
and until the following August was in Gaylord's rolling mill. His 
father then persuaded him to take charge of a boarding house, and in 
1838 he opened a grocery store and for more than forty years was its 
proprietor, finally retiring from business in June, 1881. At that time 
be sold out to John i\I. Wendelken, who continued the enterprise so that 
under their united management it had existed for more than sixty years. 
Vincent Brodbeck was married November 2, 1838, to Ottilia Mees, a 
native of Germany. Their three children were : Elizabeth B., Rosa 
Ellen and Ottilia, the wife of John M. Wendelken. Mrs. Wendelken 
died August 3, 1914. She was the mother of four children : Anna, 
Rose, Nellie and Charles W. The daughter Anna is the wife of Frank 
E. Kiefer, now assistant cashier of the Central Natifinal Bank of Ports- 
mouth, and they have a daughter Grace. Mr. Wendelken is a member of 
the Fourth Street Methodist Episcopal Church, with which his wife was 
also identified, and their family were reared in the same faith. 

Charles W. Wendelken, M. D. A son of the old established and 
business man of Portsmouth, whose career has been sketched in pre- 
ceding paragraphs. Dr. Charles W. Wendelken has been engaged for the 
past five years in the practice of medicine and surgery, and now has a 
successful place in his profession at Portsmouth. 

Doctor Wendelken was born at Portsmouth, a son of John ]\I. and 
Ottilia (Brodbeck) Wendelken, and acquired his early education by 
attending the public schools. In 1904 he graduated from Baldwin and 
Wallace College at Berea, and then entered the medical department of 
the Western Reserve University at Cleveland, and took his degree Doctor 
of Medicine from that institution in 1908. His training was broadened 
by one year of service as interne in the Lakeside Hospital at Cleveland, 
after which he returned to Portsmouth and has been rapidly acquiring' 
position as a rising young physician and surgeon. Doctor Wendelken 
is affiliated with Aurora Lodge, No. 48, A. F. & A. M., and with River 
City Camp, No. 29, Woodmen of the World. He is an esteemed member 
of the Scioto County Medical Society, the Ohio State Medical Society and 
the American Medical Association, and is secretary of the Scioto County 
Anti-Tuberculosis League. 



840 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

H. Stanley jMcCall. One of the younger able attorneys of the 
Scioto County bar, H. Stanley McCall represents the present active 
generation of a family that has been identified with this section of Ohio 
since pioneer times, and is the son of the well known Dr. Edgar 0. 
McCall, long one of the prominent physicians of Portsmouth. 

H. Stanley McCall was born in South Webster, Scioto County, Ohio, 
October 22, 1888. His father. Dr. Edgar O. McCall, was born also at 
South Webster. The founder of the family in Ohio was great-grand- 
father Michael IMcCall, who according to the best information obtainable, 
was a native of the North of Ireland and of Scotch ancestry. Accom- 
panying his parents he came to America and lived for a time at Pennsyl- 
vania, became one of the early settlers in Adams County, Ohio, and 
buying timbered land near Jaektown did a great deal of hard pioneer 
labor in converting that portion of the wilderness into a cultivated farm. 
That was his home until his death. He reared four sons, John Michael, 
Alexander and Hugh, and three daughters. Hugh McCall, grandfather 
of the Portsmouth attorney, was born in Adams County, Ohio, was reared 
there and became a collier and was employed at various furnaces in 
Adams, Gallia, JacKson and Scioto counties. His last years were spent 
at South Webster, where his death occurred at the age of fifty-six. 
Hugh JMcCall married Margaret Bennett, who was born in Bloom Town- 
ship. Her father, Gilbert Bennett, was born also in Bloom Township 
on a farm, where his parents were pioneers. As a young man Gilbert 
Bennett moved to Gallia County, engaged in merchandising a few years 
at Symmes Creek, then returned to Bloom Township and spent the re- 
mainder of his days as an industrious farmer. Gilbert Bennett married 
Mary James, who was of Virginia ancestry. Margaret (Bennett) Mc- 
Call died at the age of sixty-five, and reared nine of her twelve children 
as follows: Elizabeth, Asaph, John J., IMary, Sarah, ]\Iargaret, Alex- 
ander, Dr. Edgar 0. and Stella. 

Dr. Edgar 0. McCall was for many years successfully identified with 
the school profession before taking up medicine. His early education 
was ac(iuired in the schools of South Webster, after which he was a 
student in the National Normal ITniversity at Lebanon, and then took 
up teaching. His first terra was taught at the Pinkerman schoolhouse 
in Bloom Township, and subsequently was teacher at Elm Tree school- 
house in Nile Township and later at South Webster. His work as a 
school man continued twelve years. This occupation gave him oppor- 
tunity for preparation in medicine, and he was a student under Dr. 
Edward Newell and in the class of 1890 was graduated from the Western 
Reserve IMedical College at Cleveland. His first practice was done at 
Centerville in Gallia Couiitv, and that was his home for ten years. Since 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 841 

then he has been one of the honored and highly successful physicians and 
surgeons of Portsmouth. 

Doctor McCall was married in 1886 into one of the oldest and most 
prominent families of Southern Ohio. His wife's maiden name is 
Josephine Brady. She was born in Bloom Township of Scioto County. 
Her father, David Brady, was born in the same township, and her 
grandfather was Levi Brady, a son of William Brady, one of the first 
settlers in Scioto County, who is said to have built the first house on the 
present site of Portsmouth. The Brady family lived only a short time 
along the river on account of the malaria which was prevalent in early 
times, and then sought a more healthful location in Bloom Township. 
In that locality Levi Brady hewed a farm out of the heavy forests, and 
lived there until his death on January 5, 1862, at the age of sixty-five 
years. Levi Brady married Emily Enslow, who was born in Penn.syl- 
vania March 19, 1801. Her father. Captain David Enslow, was probably 
a native of Pennsylvania, moved from that state to Ohio in 1801, the 
same year in which Ohio became a state, and a few years later settled 
in Scioto County near Wheelersburg, where he was one of the first men 
of affairs. He served as a captain in the "War of 1812. David Brady, 
father of Mrs. Dr. IMcCall, grew up on a farm, and eventually suc- 
ceeded to the ownership of a portion of the old homestead. Besides 
farming, his activities extended to merchandising for a number of years, 
and all his life was spent in Bloom Township, with the exception of the 
two and a half years he spent in California, where he went in 1849. 
David Brady married Sarah Beebe. Her father, David Beebe, was a 
native of Connecticut, loeated in Lawrence County, Ohio, was a teacher 
and lav/yer. and some years later moved to Arkansas and spent his last 
days in that state. His wife, whose name was Sarah Trowbridge, was 
a native of Pennsylvania, and after the death of her husliand returned 
to Ohio and lived till death in Bloom Township. 

Doctor MeCall is a member of the Hempstead Medical Society. He 
and his wife attend the Trinity Methodist Church at Portsmouth. Their 
five children are : H. Stanley, David Hill, Edgar Orville, Ethel and 
Stella. 

H. Stanley IMcCall has spent most of his life in Portsmouth, is a 
graduate of the high school, and acquired his professional education in 
the University of Michigan, graduating from the law department in 
1911. Since then he has been in active practice in Portsmouth and has 
succeeded in establishing himself securely in legal circles in that city. 
In the fall of 1911 he was elected city solicitor, and was re-elected in the 
fall of 1913. His fraternal affiliations are with the Benevolent and Pro- 



842 HAN&ING ROCK IRON REGION 

tective Order of Elks, the Loyal Order of Moose, and the Fraternal 
Order of Eagles. He attends the Trinity Methodist Church. 

John Wesley Byron. The career of John W. Byron has for many 
years been a vital part of the life and progress of his home city of 
Portsmouth, where he is now serving as a justice of the peace. Mr. 
Byron has lived in this section of Ohio since his birth and has won 
advancement in community esteem and material prosperity until he is 
now one of the best known citizens. 

John Wesley Byron was born on a farm in Pike County, Ohio, March 
8, 1868. His father was Jacob Byron, born in the same township, a son 
of Nicholas Byron, who was born in the Kingdom of Bavaria, where the 
name was spelled Biron. Nicholas Byron was reared and married in his 
native land, and then emigrated to America accompanied by his family, 
and found a home in Union Township of Pike County. He bought a 
tract of timbered land and literally hewed a home from out the wilder- 
ness, and lived there until his death at the advanced age of eighty-eight 
years. He was one of the true pioneers of Pike County and a man whose 
work and influence were substantial factors in the improvement of that 
community. His wife died several years before him. They reared seven 
children named John, William, Jacob, Henry, Harriet, Mary and Mar- 
garet. Jacob Byron was reared on a farm in Pike County, and has spent 
a long and active career as a farmer, being now retired and still living 
on a farm in Union Township. This farm was his wife's inheritance. 
Jacob Byron married Nancy A. Givens, who was born in Pike County, 
where her parents, Samuel and Polly Givens, were pioneers. Jacob 
Byron and wife reared children, as follows: John Wesley, Lillie and 
Lydia, twins, Riah, Nancy, Henry and Pauline. 

John Wesley Byron grew up in the country, attended a district 
school in Pike County, and by accepting all the opportunities that came 
his way qualified for work as a teacher and spent six years in the school- 
rooms of Pike County. In 1893 Mr. Byron moved to Portsmouth, and 
for the following seven years was employed by the Selby Shoe Company 
and then for four years was with the Heer Shoe Company. In 1907 
Mr. Byron was elected to the office of justice of the peace and was 
re-elected in 1911. He has shown unusual capacity in that office and 
is a popular as well as useful citizen. 

In 1889 Mr. Byron married Emma L. Gordon. She was born in 
Pike County, Ohio, and her father, Charles M. Gordon, was born in 
Marion Township of that county, February 6, 1839, a son of William 
V. Gordon, whose birth occurred in the state of New Jersey in 1804. 
William V. Gordon in 1816 was brought out to Ohio, and was one of the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 843 

pioneers of Pike County. In that county he was married in 1828 to 
Maria Beauchamp, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Prettyman) Beau- 
champ, recognized as among the old and substantial families of Southern 
Ohio. William V. Gordon lived in Pike County until his death in 1860. 
The son, Charles M. Gordon, lived at home until grown to manhood, 
and then bought a farm of one hundred and ten acres in Marion Town- 
ship and occupied that land until his death. Charles M. Gordon mar- 
ried Harriet James, daughter of John James. Mrs. Byron died Feb- 
ruary 5, 1914. There were three children: Hattie L., Mildred A. and 
Harold. Mr. Byron is an active member of the Trinity Methodist 
Church, which his wife also attended, and is a member of the Bible 
Class and active in church affairs. He is affiliated with Portsmouth 
Lodge, No. 41, of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Ports- 
mouth, Chapter No. 11, American Insurance Union, and of River City 
Camp, No. 29, Woodmen of the World. 

William Seymour Walker. Among the prominent citizens whom 
Portsmouth has been called upon to mourn during the past few years, 
none have been more genuinely missed than William Seymour Walker, 
a man of great heart and strong character, whom it was a privilege to 
know, either in the business world or in social circles. A native of 
New York State, he was born March 18, 1861, in the City of Buffalo. 
He received his early education in the public schools of Chicago, where 
his parents located when he was a small child. After the terrible con- 
flagration that destroyed that city, in October, 1871, he went with the 
family to Milwaukee, where he and his sister completed their studies. 

At the age of eighteen years, with the confidence and self-reliant 
spirit characteristic of one possessing his keen ability and enterprise, he 
began the battle of life on his own account, first as a bookkeeper, and 
later as an expert accountant. Preferring a more active career, he vis- 
ited various cities of the Union as a commercial traveler. Coming to 
Portsmouth, Ohio, on one of his trips, Mr. Walker was so favorably 
impressed with the city and its future prospects that he made up his 
mind to locate here permanently. In 1887, therefore, he secured a 
position as bookkeeper with the firm then known as the Goldsmith & 
Rapp Veneer Company. Thoroughly efficient and industrious, and 
much interested in advancing the interests of his employers, he was 
promoted from time to time, and in 1900 became general manager of 
the entire business now known as the Portsmouth Veneer & Panel Com- 
pany. He was also founder and presidejit of the Walker Veneer & 
Lumber Company of Mound City, Iowa, which is a stock company. He 
ably and satisfactorily filled the responsible position, winning the 



844 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

respect and good will of all with whom he came in contact. Earl}' in 
October, 1911, Mr. Walker, who was suffering from a malady which 
nothing but skilful surgery could relieve, went, accompanied by his 
faithful wife, to Cleveland to consult an eminent surgeon, and died in 
that city on November 5, 1911, news of his death coming as a shock and 
a profound sorrow, not onlj' to his family and friends, but to his asso- 
ciates and to the public in general. 

Many expressions of sympathy were tendered ^Irs. Walker and her 
family in their great affliction, not only from personal and business 
friends, but from fraternal, industrial, financial and other associations 
with which ]Mr. Walker was connected, including Portsmouth Camp 
No. 3993, ]\Iodern Woodmen of America, the Employers' Association 
of Portsmouth, Ohio, and the Central National Bank of Portsmouth. 

The funeral services of ^Ir. Walker, held at his home in Portsmouth, 
November 7, 1911, were attended by many of his business associates, 
some of whom came from many miles away, froui distant towns and 
nearby states, all desirous of paying the last mark of respect to a man 
whose influence for good will long be felt throughout Central Ohio. 
He was a man of keen intellect ; wise in council ; firm in his convictions, 
yet gracious in yielding to the will of others; and true as steel in his 
integrity. In his domestic life, which was one of rare happiness, there 
were the more sacred and tender qualities that are too hallowed to he 
spoken by other than household lips. Of ]Mr. Walker it can truly be 
said, 

"His life was gentle, and the elements 
So mixed in him, that nature might stand up 
And say to all the world, this was a man." 

Mr. Walker married, on August 14, 1889, :Miss Effie ]\Iay Petrie, of 
whom a brief sketch may be found on another page of this volume, and 
into the household thus established three children, were born, namely, 
Paul Norton, Harold Holcoinb and Sarah Louise. 

]\Irs. Effie M.\y Walked. A woman of pleasing personality, ener- 
getic and eminently capable, Mi*s. Effie ]\Iay Walker, vice president of 
the Portsmouth Veneer & Panel Company, is well known in the business 
and social life of her home city, being ever mindful of her official duties, 
and never neglectful of the pleasant demands of society and friends. 
She was l)orn near Chill icothe, Ross County. Ohio, a daughter of James 
Petrie, Jr., and is the widow of the late AVilliam Seymour Walker, for 
many years a prominent and much-beloved eitizeii of Portsmouth. 

IMrs. Walker's paternal grandfather, James Petrie, Sr., was born 
and bred in Seotland. and there nuirried. Iimiiigrating with his familv 



HANGING PtOCK IRON REGION 845 

to the United States, coming with a colony of brave Scotchmen, he 
settled in Pike County, Ohio, near Jasper, and having purchased land, 
was there engaged in agricultural pui-suits during his remaining days, 
he and his wife both dying on the home farm. They were the parents 
of two children, James and Charles. 

James Petrie, Jr., was born at Patrick, a suburb of Glasgow, Scot- 
land, and was but a lad when brought to Ohio by his parents. He grew 
to man's estate in Pike County, and in 1862 enlisted in Company A. 
Fifty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry. Going South with his regiment, 
he took part in many of the more important engagements of the war, 
including among others the battle of Monterey, Tennessee, and the 
engagements at Corinth, Chickasaw Bayou, Black River, Mission Ridge, 
and in the numerous skirmishes occurring while en route to Atlanta. 
He was at the front in the siege of Atlanta, and took part in the battles 
at Jonesboro, Fort ]McAlester and at North Edisto River. Being hon- 
orably discharged with his regiment at the close of the conflict, 
j\Ir. Petrie returned to his home in Pike County, Ohio, and there resumed 
.farming. Removing later to Ross County, he remained there two years, 
and then again returned to Pike County, settling on a farm located 
about two miles from Jasper. He was soon apointed postmaster at 
Jasper, and retained the position until his death, at the age of seventy- 
three years. 

The maiden name of the wife of James Petrie, Jr., the mother of 
]\Irs. Walker, Avas Louisa Frances Ashton. She was born in New 
Richmond, Ohio, a daughter of Joseph Ashton, Jr., and granddaughter 
of Joseph Ashton, Sr., who was the great-grandfather of ]Mrs. Walker. 
Joseph Ashton, Sr., served as a soldier in the Continental army during 
the Revolutionary war, his record as given in the archives of Pennsyl- 
vania being as follows: He was commissioned second lieutenant of the 
Second Regiment of Artillery, commanded by Col. John H. Lamb; on 
January 23, 1777, he was promoted to first lieutenant and adjutant; on 
May — , 1778, he was transferred to the Pennsylvania Artillery Regi- 
ment, under Col. Thomas Proctor; April 19, 1781, he was promoted to 
the rank of captain ; and on January 1, 1783, w^as made paymaster. He 
marched with Arnold to Quebec, where he was taken prisoner. He con- 
tinued a member of the militia after the close of the Revolution, and 
fought the Indians in the Noiihwest Territory. He lived to a ripe old 
age, dying in 1816. 

Joseph Ashton, Jr., Mrs. Walker's grandfather, was born at Old- 
town, Pennsylvania, near New Castle, and in his youthful days served 
an apprenticeship at the trade of a steamboat builder in Pittsburgh. In 
1847, having completed his trade, he came to Ohio, and for eight years 



846 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

lived in New Richmond. In 1855 he embarked in the feed business at 
Portsmouth, being in partnership with his brother-in-law, Milton Ken- 
nedey, for a year. He was afterwards in company with Henry Dins- 
more as a bottler of mineral waters. During the progress of the Civil 
war he removed to Ross County, Ohio, which was his home for ten years. 
In 1864 he was appointed treasury clerk, and sent South, being sta- 
tioned at Vieksburg and other points, and at one time while thus em- 
ployed was captured by the enemy at Goodrich's Landing, Louisiana. 
Returning from the South, Mr. Ashton lived in Pike and Ross counties 
a few years, and then assumed charge of the City Hospital in Ports- 
mouth, an office which he tilled for a number of years, being quite 
successful as superintendent of the institution. From 1878 until 1891 
he was justice of the peace in Wayne Township. Resigning the posi- 
tion, he moved to Sinking Spring, Highland County, where he resided 
until his death. 

Joseph Ashton, Jr., married Matilda Kennedey, a native of Penn- 
sylvania, and among their children was a daughter named Louisa 
Frances, who became the wife of James Petrie, Jr. Mrs. Louisa Frances 
(Ashton) Petrie died at the early age of twenty-six years, leaving five 
children, namely: Effie May, Jessie, Flora, Harry Victor and Martha. 
After the death of his first wife, Mr. Petrie married for his second 
wife Helen McGregor, a native of Scotland, and to them three children 
were born, namely : George, Charles and Cecil. 

Effie May Petrie received excellent educational advantages when 
young, and at the age of twenty-three years became the wife of the late 
William Seymour Walker, of whom a brief biography is given on 
another page of this volume. Mrs. Walker is vice president of the 
Portsmouth Veneer & Panel Company, as previously mentioned, and 
is president of the New Century Club and of the Country Club. She 
is a member of the Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church, and has 
reared her children, Paul N., Harold H. and Sara L., in the same faith. 

Hon. William Davis Tremper. One of the older residents of 
Portsmouth, Dr. William D. Tremper has been identified with his 
profession as a dentist in this city more than forty years, and is now 
representing the Seventh Senatorial District in the State Legislature. 
He has been a man of such activity in public affairs as to require no 
special introduction to the people of Scioto County. 

William Davis Tremper was born at New Richmond, Clermont 
Township, Ohio, May 9, 1851. He is of colonial and revolutionary 
ancestry, and the following brief account of the Tremper genealogy is 
taken from that authentic work, Munsell's American Ancestry, Vol. II. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 847 

The first American of the name was Jacob Tremper, a native of Ger- 
many, who settled in the Colony of New York about 1713. The name 
of his wife was Christina Welker. Their son, Jacob Tremper, who was 
born in Germany about 1712, was a soldier in the New York militia in 
1738. He married Anna JMaria Peffer, a daughter of Michael and Anna 
Maria (Hoffman) Peffer. 

Michael Tremper, a son of the above, and representing the third 
generation in America, was born in New York j\Iarch 13, 1745, and was 
admitted as a freeman in that colony in 1769. After New York City 
was evacuated by the American troops in 1776, he removed with his 
family to Fishkill, and served with the Dutchess County militia during 
the war. He was married March 15, 1767, to Louisa Van Deusen, 
daughter of Daniel and Leah (Hertje) Van Deusen. 

Their son, Daniel Tremper, grandfather of Dr. William D. Tremper, 
was born in New York April 15, 1770, was reared and married in his 
native state, and lived there until about 1815, when he became one of 
the early settlers of Ohio. His location was at Walnut Hills. At that 
time Cincinnati was only a village, and Walnut Hills farming and 
grazing land. A few years later, having sold his interests there, he 
removed to Clermont County, bought land and engaged in farming 
until his death on IMarch 20, 1833. He was married May 16, 1791, to 
Ariette Keiffer. 

Johnson Tremper, a son of Daniel, was born in Esopus, New York, 
February 9, 1809, and was a very small boy when brought to Ohio. In 
this state he learned the trade of chairmaker, at a time when chairs and 
other furniture were made by hand. He established a shop and did 
quite a business in this line, and shipped large quantities of chairs 
down the Ohio and JMississippi rivers on flatboats to the southern cities. 
Johnson Tremper continued business in New Richmond and remained 
a resident of that town until his death. He married Laura Jeft'ries, 
who was born in New York, a daughter of John Chapman and Deborah 
(Starkweather) Jeffries, her maternal grandfather having been Samuel 
Starkweather. Johnson Tremper and \yiie reared six children, named 
Alma, Louise, Delia, William D., Robert H. and Allan. 

William D. Tremper acquired his early education in the public 
schools of New Richmond, and later was a student in the University of 
Michigan at Ann Arbor. He began the study of dentistry under Doctor 
Mollyneaux at New Richmond, and continued his professional prepara- 
tion in the Ohio Dental College at Cincinnati, graduating in 1872. For 
several years, until 1878, he was engaged in practice at Ypsilanti, Mich- 
igan, and since then has been a resident of Portsmouth and for many 
years was in active practice. Doctor Tremper was one of the organizers 



848 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

of the Royal Savings & Loan Company at Portsmouth, and since that 
time has been secretary of the organization and gives much of his time 
and attention to this institution. 

On December 6, 1880, Doctor Tremper married Mary Todd Hayman. 
She was born at Newport, Kentucky, and comes of an old southern fam- 
il3^ Her father was Hon. Richard Henry Hayman, born in Newport 
June 6, 1826, a son of Isaiah Tilden and Elizabeth (Tarvin) Hayman. 
Elizabeth Tarvin was a daughter of Richard Tarvin. Both the Hay- 
mans and Tarvins were old Virginia families. Richard H. Hayman 
acquired his education in the public schools of Newport and Covington, 
Kentucky, and his father, who was a dry goods merchant, set him up 
in business at Letart Falls, in Meigs County, Ohio. Eighteen months 
later he went out to Missouri, where his father had established a store, 
remained there a year and a half, and on account of ill health returned 
to Ohio. On recovering, he engaged in the dry goods business at New- 
port, and for eighteen years was one of the successful merchants of that 
city. Failing health again caused his removal, and after selling out he 
located in Scioto County, bought a farm in the Scioto bottoms 
about five miles north of the courthouse at Portsmouth. This farm 
was his home a few years, and in 1882 he came into Portsmouth and 
"built a handsome residence on a hillside overlooking the city, and 
remained there until his death. Richard H. Hayman was prominent in 
public affairs and a democrat in politics. He served as city clerk and 
member of the council at Newport, and in 1877 was elected to the Ohio 
State Legislature and had an active part in the proceedings of that 
body. He also sei-ved for several years as tax commissioner for Scioto 
County. He was twice married. The maiden name of his first wife 
was Elizabeth Fairman, daughter of Dr. Loyal Fairman. She died 
May 9, 1863. His second wife was Mrs. Ellen Sharpless, who died June 
3, 1890. The two children of the first marriage were Mary Todd, Mrs. 
Tremper; and Floyd, who died at the age of twenty-two. 

Mr. and Mrs. Tremper are the parents of four children : Richard 
H. ; Laura F., wife of Charles H. Blakemore ; William J. ; and Hugh H. 
The son Richard graduated from the University of Michigan with the 
degree A. B., spent some time in travel in Europe with his grandfather, 
then studied art for two years, and after two years as a teacher in the 
Portsmouth High School is now taking postgraduate work at Ann 
Arbor. William J., the second son, is a graduate of the Portsmouth 
High School and the dental department of the University of Michigan, 
and is now in active practice at Portsmouth. Hugh, the youngest son, 
after finishing the Portsmouth High School, entered the University of 
Michigan. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 849 

Doctor Tremper is affiliated with Aurora Lodge No. 48, A. F. & 
A. M.; with Solomon Council No. 79, R. & S. ]M. ; with Mount V^ernon 
Chapter No. 23, R. A. ^I. ; and with Calvary Coinmandery No. 13, K. T. 
He and his wife are members of the First Presbyterian Church in 
Portsmouth. Doctor Tremper 's first presidential vote was cast for 
U. S. Grant, and he has been a stanch supporter of the republican party 
ever since. It was his recognized public spirit and his thorough quali- 
fications as a business man that led the people of the Seventh District 
to support him for the office of state senator. 

Green S. Neary. One of the honored citizens of the Hanging Rock 
Iron Region is Green S. Neary, wiio is now living retired in Portsmouth. 
His experience covers a period spent as a soldier of the Union, as a 
hard-working and capable farmer and business man and useful citizen 
in all the varied relations of life. 

He was born in Harrisonville, Scioto County, March 12, 1844, and 
has seen more than threescore and ten years of life. His f^.^her, Mat- 
thew Neary, was born in Roscommon County, Ireland, in 1804. Left an 
orphan when young, some years later he came to Amei'iea, being six 
weeks on a sailing vessel before landing in New York, and in that state 
found work along the canal. Coming here an entire stranger in a 
strange land, he had his own destiny to make from the first, his willing 
hands his only capital. He was married near Geneva in New York and 
about 1834 came to Ohio, making the journey by canal and river. At 
Harrisonville he was employed at different work, and his industry and 
thrift enabled him to make a good account of his time. Finally, he 
bought a farm on the Little Scioto in Harrison Township, near Harrison 
^Nlills, and devoted his time to its cultivation and made his home there 
until about a year before his death, when he found a home with his 
son Green. His death occurred when eighty-seven years old. 

^Matthew Neary married Sarah Ann Van Gorder, a native of New 
York State. James Van Gorder, her father, who is thought to have been 
a native of the same state and of Holland ancestry, moved to Ohio about 
1834, accompanied by his family. The trip was made with wagon and 
teams, and it was several weeks before they arrived at their destination 
at Harrisonville. There he built a frame house and opened it for the 
entertainment of the pul)lic, and for several years it was a popular place 
for travelers. His death occurred at the old home in Scioto County in 
1853. James Van Gorder married Rebecca Coryell, who was born in 
New York State June 2, 1814, and survived her husband a few years. 
:Mrs. ^Matthew Neary died October 20, 1901. Her five children were 
Henry, Sarah Ann, Lewis, Daniel and Green S. 



850 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Green S. Neary had the usual experiences of the farmer boy in the 
decade prior to the war, and gained an education in the rural schools. 
In July, 1862, at the age of eighteen, he enlisted in the Ninety-first 
Regiment of Ohio Infantry, and was with the regiment in all its 
battles, campaigns and marches until the latter part of July, 1864. On 
July 24th he was captured when near Winchester, and as a prisoner of 
war was confined first at Danville, Virginia, and later became an inmate 
of the notorious Libby Prison. At the end of eight months, and when 
the war was drawing to a close, he was paroled with the understanding 
that he was to be exchanged at the end of thirty days. Returning home 
and awaiting the stated time, he then rejoined his regiment at Win- 
chester, and continued in the service until his honorable discharge in 
June, 1865, having been in the army and prison almost three years. 

Returning home, he helped his father a time and then began con- 
tracting for the building of bridges, roads, etc. In 1889 Mr. Neary 
bought a farm in Harrison Township, and later acquired the home 
place of 160 acres at Harrison Furnace. After living there until 1893 
he sold, and bought the Judge Crull farm in the same township. That 
was the scene of his active labors until 1911, at which date he came to 
Portsmouth and has since lived retired, enjoying the fruits of a long 
and well-spent career. 

Mr. Neary first married Hester A. Tibbs, who was born ni West 
Virginia, daughter of Samuel and Sarah Tibbs. She died in 1869, 
having lost her daughter Florence in her third year. Mr. Neary mar- 
ried for his second wife Miss Lizzie E. Humphrey. She was bom in 
Morgan County, Ohio, May 18, 1852. Her father, Benjamin Humphrey, 
was born in West Virginia September 19, 1827, a son of John Hum- 
phrey, a native of the same state, who came to Ohio in 1829, living for 
a time in INIorgan County and later in Pike County, where he died in 
middle life. John Humphrey married Elizabeth Van Pelt, who was 
of Pennsylvania stock. Brought to Ohio at the age of two years, 
Benjamin Humphrey in 1854 came to Scioto County, and for twenty 
years was employed in the Bloom furnace, afterward at the Webster and 
Buckhorn furnaces, and finally became manager of the Howard fur- 
nace, where his last years were spent. Benjamin Humphrey married 
Lavinia Elliot, who was born in Morgan County, daughter of Simeon 
and Ellen (Mahew) Elliot. 

Mr. and Mrs. Neary have a daughter, Edna L., who married Benja- 
min F. Stewart, and has a son named Benjamin Donald. Mr. Neary 
has been an active republican. Always a good citizen, he has given 
official service as trustee and overseer of Harrison Township and for 
three terms was one of the county commissioners. With his wife he 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 851 

is a member of the Manly Methodist Episcopal Church and belongs to 
Bailey Post No. 164, G. A. R. 

Hon. George Drake Scudder. Prominent among the highly 
respected men and representative citizens of Scioto County is Hon. 
George Drake Scudder, of Portsmouth, who came to this city upwards 
of a score of years ago, and has since occupied a place of note in the 
community. He was born January 17, 1856, in Trenton, New Jersey, of 
English lineage. His father, Hon. Edward Wallace Scudder, was born 
in 1822 in IMercer County, New Jersey, which was likewise the birth- 
place of his father, Jasper Smith Scudder. The immigrant ancestor 
of Mr. Scudder came from England to America, and settled in Massa- 
chusetts soon after the arrival of the Mayflower at Plymouth with its 
little band of pilgrims. One of his descendants, Richard Scudder, 
thought to have been born on Long Island, removed to New Jersey in 
colonial days, becoming the founder of the Scudder family of that 
state. He was the owner of a large estate on the Delaware River, and 
there spent his last days. 

Jasper Smith Scudder was an apt scholar, and while young pre- 
pared for college, but his father died, and he then devoted his time 
to the supervision of the parental estate. After occupying the old 
home farm a number of years, he moved to Trenton, and was there 
associated with the Trenton Banking Company until his death, at the 
age of fourscore years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Still- 
well Reeder, was born in New Jersey, of English ancestry, and there 
spent her entire life, dying in the City of Trenton. She was the mother 
of two children, as follows : Edward Wallace ; and Christiana, who 
married William R. Mcllvaine. 

Edward Wallace Scudder received superior educational advantages, 
being fitted for college when quite young, and was graduated from 
Princeton University with the class of 1811. He subsequently studied 
law with Hon. William L. Dayton, who, in 1856, was candidate for vice 
president, running with John C. Fremont. Admitted to the bar, he met 
with eminent success as an attorney, and in 1869 was appointed by 
Governor Randolph as judge of the Supreme Court of New Jersey, a 
position which he ably filled until his death, twenty-four years 
later, on February 3, 1893. He married Mary Louisa Drake, a 
daughter of Judge George K. Drake, a lifelong resident of New Jersey. 
Mr. Drake was graduated from Princeton University, and after practic- 
ing law successfully at Morristown, served for seven years as a judge 
in the Superior Court. Mr. Drake married Mary Halsey, who was of 
English ancestry, and belonged to a family of note, one of her rela- 



852 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

tives, Thomas Ilalsey, having served several years as a member of 
Parliament. ^Irs. Mary Louisa (Drake) Scudder died in 1890. She 
reared six children, as follows: Edmund Drake Scudder; Henry Darey 
Scudder; Wallace Mcllvane Scudder; George Drake Scudder; Mary 
Scudder, who married Prof. Alexander Jamison, of the Lawrenceville 
Preparatory School; and Louisa, who became the -wife of Capt. Henry 
Pratt Perrin, of the United States army. 

Laying a substantial foundation for his future education in the 
State Model School of Trenton, New Jersey, George Drake Scudder 
entered Princeton University in 1872, and was there graduated in 1876. 
Following in the footsteps of his ancestors, he studied law, and after 
his admission to the bar was engaged in the practice of his profession 
in Trenton for a number of years, until his removal to Ohio. In 1893 
he came to Portsmouth, Ohio, which has since been his home, and is 
now devoting his time and energies to his private interests and his 
official duties. While living in Chambersburg, a suburb of Trenton, 
New Jersey, Mr. Scudder served as a member of the council of that 
borough. In 1886 he was elected to the New Jersey Legislature, and in 
the long-drawn contest for the election of a senator cast his vote for 
Hon. Leon Abbett. Since coming to Portsmouth, he has served in 
various official capacities, and is now a member of the Portsmouth Board 
of Education, and secretary and treasurer of the Board of Trustees of 
the Portsmouth Public Library; also trustee of the County Children's 
and of the Portsmouth Bar Association. 

Mr. Scudder married, November 20, 1879, Harriet Helen Damarin, 
who was born in Portsmouth, a daughter of Charles A. ]\1. and Harriet 
Caroline Damarin, of whom a sketch may be found on another page 
of this work. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Scudder have one child, Charles Damarin 
Scudder. He was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, and was graduated from 
Princeton University in 1907. He is now engaged in the insurance 
business in Portsmouth. He married Katherinc Waite, and they have 
one son, Charles Damarin Scudder, Jr. 

Fraternally ]Mr. Scudder joined Column Lodge No. 120, Ancient 
Free and Accepted ^lasons, in Trenton, New Jersey, of which he served 
one year as master, and is now a member of Aurora Lodge No. 48, 
Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons, of Portsmouth ; he also 
belongs to Calvary Commandery No. 13, Knights Templar; and to 
Solomon Council No. 79, Royal and Select Masters. Mr. and ^Irs. 
Scudder are members of the Presbyterian Church, which he is serving 
as an elder. For sixteen years ^Ir. Scudder has been superintendent of 
the Sunday school connected with that church. He has twice been a 
representative to the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 853 

and from 1910 until 191:3 was a member of the Executive Conuuittee 
of the Presbyterian Church of the United States of America. 

George Dyar Selby. Beginning life in the valley of limited cir- 
cumstances rather than on the plane of affluence, George Dyar Selby, of 
Portsmouth, president of the Selby Shoe Company, has achieved marked 
success in the business world, and for many years has been conspicu- 
ously identified with the growth of his home city, and the advancement 
of its material interests. A native of Ohio, he was born on a farm in 
Berne Township, Athens County, of good old New England stock. He 
is a direct descendant in the sixth generation from Jeremiah Selby, the 
lineage being thus traced: Jeremiah, AVilliam, Jeremiah, Dyar, Ilines 
Cone and George Dyar. 

Jeremiah Selby was born and educated in England. Immigrating to 
America in early manhood, he located at East Haddam, Connecticut, 
where he married Susanna Dutton, and thereafter spent his remaining 
years, being actively engaged in the practice of medicine. William 
Selby was born in East Iladdam, Connecticut, June 5, 1716, and was 
a lifelong resident of that place, as was his wife, whose maiden name 
was Hannah Brainard. Jeremiah Selby, whose birth occurred in East 
Iladdam, December 9, 1745, there married Sarah Cone, a daughter of 
Daniel or Jared Cone, there seeming to be some contlicting evidence 
on this point. In 1807 he migrated to New York State, making the 
removal with teams, it having been long before the day of railroads, 
and settled in Wayne County, at Sodus Bay, where both he and his 
wife spent the remainder of their lives. Dyar Selliy was born in East 
Haddam, Connecticut, July 4, 1784, and in 1807 accompanied his 
parents to Wayne County, New York. 

Dyar Selby married, February 17, 1811, in Wayne County, Tabitha 
Calhoun, who was born ]\Iarch 15, 1791, at Peter.sham, Worcester County, 
iMassaehusetts, a daughter of James Calhoun, who served with the 
Massachusetts troops in the Revolutionary war. In 1807 Mr. Calhoun 
started westward with his family from Petersham, his daughter Tabitha 
driving one of the teams the entire distance to Wayne County, New 
York, where he was a pioneer settler. In 1819. eight years after his 
marriage to Miss Calhoun, Dyar Selby came to Ohio, accompanied l)y 
his wife and their four children, landing in ^Marietta. He lived for 
a time in one end of a double log house, which he rented, it being a few 
miles from the village, and later moved to Rainbow Bend, where he 
lived until'1827. Going then to Wesley Townsliip, Washington County, 
he lived for five years on a farm lying two miles north of Bartlett. In 
1832 he located in IBerne Township, two and one-half miles west of 



854 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Bartlett, and there lived in a log house until his death, in 1873. He 
filled various public offices, including those of township trustee and 
justice of the peace. His wife died in 1853. They reared ten children, 
as follows : Jeremiah, Dyar, Hines Cone, Sarah, Susan, Warren, Jared, 
Fanny, Elizabeth and Francis IMarion. 

Hines Cone Selby was born in Wayne County, New York, October 
9, 1815, and at the age of four was brought by Ms parents to Ohio. 
Reared to agricultural pursuits, he began life for himself as a farmer 
on rented land. Being successful in his undertakings, he, a few years 
later, bought land in Berne Township, and in the substantial hewed log 
house that he erected spent the remainder of his life, passing away in 
1889. He married Sarah Ann Rardin, who was born in Berne Town- 
ship, Washington County, Ohio, December 15, 1820, a daughter of 
William Rardin, and granddaughter of Henry Rardin, a pioneer settler 
of Ohio. Her great-grandfather, Dennis Rardin, with a brother, John 
Rardin, emigrated from Ireland to America about 1750, and settled in 
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where his death occurred in 1789. 
Born and reared in Pennsylvania, Henry Rardin came by way of the 
Ohio River to Marietta, Ohio, in 1807. He subsequently became one of 
the earlier settlers of Washington County, where he bought land, and 
on the farm which he cleared from the forest resided until his death, in 
1856, at the advanced age of ninety-nine years. The maiden name of 
his Avife was Elizabeth Hull. The birth of William Rardin occurred 
April 29, 1797, in Pennsylvania. He grew to man's estate in Washing- 
ton County, Ohio, and when ready to begin life for himself purchased 
land in Berne Township, and was there engaged in farming until his 
death, in 1876. He married Elizabeth Anders, who was born at Red 
Stone Fort, Pennsylvania, and as a small child was brought by her 
widowed mother to Ohio, where the remainder of her years were spent, 
her death occurring on the home farm in 1890, at the age of ninety-one 
years. Of the union of Hines Cone and Sarah Ann (Rardin) Selby 
tw^elve children were born, namely: Oliver 0., ^lary E., John W., 
George Dyar, ^Mehitabel T., David H., Sarah J., Sanford P., James 0., 
Prudence A., Samuel V. and Roena R. 

Educated in the rural schools of his native township, and taught to 
W'ork on the home farm, George Dyar Selby learned in his boyhood 
those lessons of industry and thrift that have since proved such valu- 
able assets in his career. In February, 1865, he offered his services to 
his country, enlisting in Company H, One Hundred and Eighty-sixth 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Avhich was assigned to the Army of the Cuna- 
berland, and was on duty in Southern Tennessee and Northern Georgia 
until the close of the conflict, when he was honorablv discharged. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 855 

Returning to his home, he continued his studies at a seminary in Athens 
County, after which he taught school one term. In 1867 Mr. Selby 
came to Portsmouth, Scioto County, as agent for the Singer IManufac- 
turing Company, and canvassed throughout this section of the state 
for the sale of its machines. In 1880, becoming interested in the manu- 
facture of shoes, he formed a partnership with Irving Drew, of whom 
a sketch appears elsewhere in this volume, and Bernard Damon, and 
established himself in business on his own account. The venture proved 
eminently successful and in 1902 was incorporated as The Drew-Selby 
Company. In 1906, Mr. Selby having obtained control of all of Mrs. 
Drew's holdings, the company name was changed to The Selby Shoe 
Company, with George D. Selby as president, Pearl E. Selby, vice presi- 
dent and general superintendent, Mark W. Selby, vice president and 
secretary, and J. J. Rardin, treasurer. This firm, which is one of the 
leading ones of the kind in this part of Ohio, is carrying on an extensive 
and profitable business, the products of its factory being widely and 
favorably known, and ever in demand in the leading markets of the 
United States, as well as a number of foreign countries. ]\Ir. Selby is a 
man of rare discrimination and of great administrative ability, and is 
officially connected with various enterprises, of which we will mention 
but two, The Security Savings Bank and Trust Company, of which he 
is president, and The First National Bank of Portsmouth, of which he 
IS a director. 

Mr. Selby married, September 26, 1867, Lydia V. Webster, who was 
born in Chester TowTiship, Meigs County, Ohio, a daughter of Isaac A. 
and Lydia (Ashton) Webster, natives of New York State and Logan, 
Ohio, respectively. Isaac A. Webster was born in New York State 
April 9, 1801, and came with his parents to Meigs County, Ohio, at the 
age of nine years, where he resided till his death, March 7, 1865. 
Mr. and Mrs. Selby are the parents of five children, namely : Pearl E., 
Cora W., Mark W., Homer C. and Roger A. Pearl E. Selby married 
Blanche E. Smith, and they have two children, Harold Rea and Gladys. 
Cora W. Selby married Benjamin H. Dillon, and at her death, which 
occurred February 26, 1908, left one son, Edmund Selby Dillon. Mark 
W. Selby has been twice married. He married first j\Iaude Grimes, who 
died in 1905, leaving one child, Alice Christine Selby. He married for 
his second wife Adelaide Hare. Homer C. Selby married for his first 
wife Laura ]\Ioody, Avho died in 1906, leaving one child, IMary Louise 
Selby. He married second Lola Davis. Religiously Mr. and ]\Irs. Selby 
are members of the Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church, Mr. Selby 
being also a member of its official board. Fraternally Mr. Selby belongs 
to Aurora Lodge No. 48, Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons; 



856 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

to Mount VerBon Chapter No. 23, Royal Arch Masons: to Solomon 
Council No. 79, Royal and Select Masters; to Calvary Commandery 
No. 13, Knights Templar; and he is also a thirty-second degree Scottish 
Rite ]\lasou. He likewise belongs to Bailey Post No. 164, Grand Army 
of the Republic. 

Judge Albion Zelophead Blair. Conspicuous among the foremost 
lawyers of Scioto County is Judge Albion Z. Blair, of Portsmouth, a 
man of vigorous mentality and scholarly attainments, who has acquired 
distinction in his chosen profession, and a place of honor among his 
fellow-townsmen. A son of George W. Blair, he was born Friday, 
December 13, 1861, on a Jackson Township farm, in Highland County, 
Ohio, and there grew to man's estate. 

His paternal grandfather, John Blair, was a native, it is thought, of 
one of the Carolinas. He was of early colonial ancestrj^ and a member 
of that branch of the Blair family that has figured prominently in the 
history of the United States. He spent a few of the earlier years of his 
life in Kentucky, later becoming a pioneer of Adams County, Ohio. 
Securing a tract of timbered land in A¥inchester Township, he hewed 
a farm from the wildernerss, and there spent his reuiaiuing years. He 
married JMartha Bramble, who was also of colonial ancestry, and both 
lived to a good old age. Thej^ reared eight children, as follows : Greer, 
George W., William, John, Joseph, Rebecca, Sarah and Polly Ann. 

Born on the home farm in AVinchester Townsliip, Adams County, 
Ohio, February 7, 1832, George W. Blair grew to manhood amid pioneer 
scenes. He assisted his father in the arduous task of clearing a farm 
as soon as old enough to be of use, and as a young man made occasional 
trips to Ripley and Cincinnati, the nearest market points, carrying the 
surplus produce of the farm with a six-horse team to those places, aiul 
bringing back on his return merchandise and household supplies. At 
the time of his marriage he located on a farm in Winchester Township, 
beginning married life in a small log caliin, with a slick and earth 
chimney, lighted by two small windows, each containing four little panes 
of glass. Having no stoves in those days, his wife did all of her cooking 
by the fireplace, and in addition to her other household duties spun 
and wove all of the cloth- from which she fashioned the clothes for her 
household. Subsequently moving to Jackson Township, he lived for 
a while on the farm of his father-in-law, James Frazier. He was very 
successful as an agriculturist, and subsequently bought two farms 
adjoining the old Frazier homestead, erected substantial frame build- 
ings, and was there prosperously engaged in tilling the soil until his 
death. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 857 

The maiden name of the wife of George W. Blair was Nancy Miller 
Frazier. She was born ]\Iarch 5, 1833, in Highland County, Ohio, on 
the present site of the Town of Greentield, a daughter of James Frazier. 
Her grandfather, William Frazier, the Judge's great-grandfather, was 
wounded in the forehead while serving as a soldier in the Revolutionary 
army, and carried the scar until the day of his death. He was twice 
married, and reared a family of twenty-three children. James Frazier, 
maternal grandfather of Judge Blair, was born September 17, 1799, in 
Campbell County, Virginia, where his parents were lifelong residents. 
Migrating to Ohio after his marriage, he made the removal with teams, 
locating in Highland County. He contracted for a piece of land in the 
Paint Creek bottom. The land was good, but malaria being prevalent, he 
sold his interest in that, and moved to Jackson Township, where he 
took up land, and on the farm which he redeemed from the wilderness 
resided until his death. James Frazier married Charlotte Boatright, 
who was also a native of Virginia, her birth occurring February 11, 
1801, and she died at the age of eighty years. During his residence in 
Ohio, Mr. Frazier visited his old Virginia home eleven times, making 
the trips to and fro on horseback. Mr. and ^Irs. George W. Blair were 
the parents of three children, as follows: Albion Zelophead, the special 
subject of this brief biographical sketch ; Lametta I., wife of James 
C^plinger, of Jackson Township; and George A. 

.Vcquiring an excellent education in the public schools, Albion Z. 
Blair, in his eighteenth year, began his career as a teacher in Bratton 
Township, Adams County, and taught school for twelve .years there- 
after. While thus employed he devoted all of his leisure time in advanc- 
ing his education, studying civil engineering and law, and in 1890 was 
admitted to the bar. Immediately forming a partnership with Frank 
Bayless, he began the practice of his profession at West Union, being 
junior member of the firm of Bayless & Blair. Veiy soon after he was 
appointed superintendent of roads and bridges for Adams County, and 
served satisfactorily for five yeai*s, when he resigned in order that 
he might give his entire time and attention to his legal work. In April. 
1904, Judge Blair was appointed judge of the Court of Common Pleas 
for the Seventh Judicial District. In 1907 he was confirmed in the 
office by election, and has continued in the position by re-election ever 
since. In 1907 the Judge removed to Portsmouth, which he now proudly 
claims as his home. 

On February 21, 1889, Judge Blair was imited in marriage with 
Alberta M. Armacost, who was born in Clement County, Ohio, a daugh- 
ter of Levi B. and Rebecca (Welch) Armacost. Judge and Mrs. Blair 
have six children, namely: Guy ^I., Gladys M., George B., Albion, 



858 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Donald and Edgar. Politically the Judge cast his first presidential vote 
for Grover Cleveland. While a resident of Jackson Township he served 
as township clerk, and while in West Union he was a member of the 
school board. Religiously he and his family attend the Second Pres- 
byterian Church, of which Mrs. Blair is a member, and in the Sunday 
School of which the Judge is a teacher. Fraternally Judge Blair is 
a member of the Ancient Free and Accepted Order of Masons and of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

John J. McCall. Nearly a quarter of a century ago John J. McCall 
became identified with merchandising at Portsmouth, and is now pro- 
prietor of one of the best establishments in the city, located at 719 
Campbell Avenue. Since he sold his first goods many of his competitors 
have come and gone, but his own enterprise has continued with increas- 
ing proportions and represents a success gained by hard battle with 
the world, particularly during his early years. 

Mr. McCall represents one of the old families of Southern Ohio, and 
was born in Gallia County March 13, 1844. The McCall family was estab- 
lished in America during the eighteenth century, first locating in Penn- 
sylvania. His great-grandfather was Michael McCall, who was bom 
either in Scotland or in Ireland of Scotch ancestry. He was a child 
when his parents came to America and settled in Pennsylvania. 
Mr. McCall 's grandfather was one of the earlier settlers in Adams County, 
Ohio, secured a tract of timbered land and made a home in the midst 
of the forests. He reared four sons, with names John, Michael, Alexan- 
der and Hugh, and also three daughters. 

Hugh McCall, father of the Portsmouth merchant, when a young 
man began working as a collier in Adams County, later was employed 
at furnaces in Jackson, Gallia and Scioto counties, and his last work was 
at South Webster, in Scioto County, where he died at the age of fifty- 
six years. Hugh McCall married Margaret Bennett, who was bom in 
Bloom Township. Her father. Gilbert Bennett, was bom in the same 
township, while his parents were Virginians who became pioneer settlers 
of Scioto County. Gilbert Bennett moved to Gallia County during 
young manhood, was engaged in merchandising at Sims Creek for a 
few years, then returned to Bloom Township, and as a farmer spent the 
rest of his days in that vicinity. Mrs. Hugh McCall survived her hus- 
band a few years and died at the age of sixty-five. Of the twelve chil- 
dren, niae grew to maturity, named as follows: Elizabeth, Asaph, 
John J., Mary, Sarah, Margaret, Alexander, Dr. Edgar 0. and Stella. 

When John J. McCall was ten years of age his parents moved to 
Jefferson Furnace, lived one year there, and then came to South Web- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 859 

ster, in Scioto County. In the meantime his opportunities for acquiring 
an education had been somewhat limited and most of his training for 
life was of a very practical nature. In the fall of 1864, when twenty 
years of age, he found a place as storekeeper at the Clinton Furnace, 
and was later employed at the Washington Furnace in Lawrence County, 
first as storekeeper and later as bookkeeper. Mr. MeCall remained at 
the Washington Furnace six and a half years, and was bookkeeper of 
the Center Furnace a year and a half. With this accumulated experi- 
ence and with a small amount of capital, he gave up clerical work and 
began independent merchandising for a year and a half at Center 
Furnace, subsequently moved to South Webster, and for eleven years 
traveled on the road as a commercial salesman. In 1890 Mr. McCall 
left the road, came to Portsmouth, and opened a stock of goods on 
Campbell Avenue near Eighth Street. That was the beginning of his 
career as a merchant, which has continued without interruption down 
to the present time, and with the general growth and development of 
the surrounding city his own enterprise has enjoyed a similar expansion. 
Mr. McCall was first married in 1872 to Susan Paul Cole. She was 
born in Harrisville, daughter of James M. and Nancy Cole. Mrs. McCall 
died in 1883, and the present Mrs. MeCall was before her marriage Miss 
Augusta Ann Griffith. She was born in Pine Grove Furnace, Lawrence 
County, daughter of David and Martha Griffith, who were likewise 
natives of Lawrence County. Mr. MeCall by his first marriage had four 
children : Nellie, Harriet, Stella and Ada. There are also four children 
by his present wife : Edith, Augusta, Martha J. and Dudley. Mr. and 
Mrs. McCall are members of the Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church, 
while in fraternal matters he is affiliated with Aurora Lodge No. 48, 
A. F. & A. M., and with Portsmouth Camp No. 3993, Modern Woodmen 
of America. 

Adam Pfau. To feed the people has always been a task requiring 
all that man possesses of ability, industry and business enterprise. It 
is in the line of furnishing high-class articles of food to the people of 
Portsmouth that Mr. Pfau's business activities have been directed for 
the larger part of his career. Sanitary, wholesome and pure foods have 
been the object of his endeavor, and as proprietor of the Model Bakery 
he has conferred a service probably greater in value than that con- 
ferred through many other lines of enterprise. 

Adam Pfau was bom in Portsmouth April 26, 1871, and his father 
before him was a prosperous and well-remembered baker. John Adam 
Pfau was born in the Town of Schopfloch, in Wuertemberg, Germany, 
February 28, 1839. His father was Johann Pfau, a farmer and life- 



860 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

long resident of Wuerteinberg. John Adam Pfau attended school 
steadily until fourteen years of age, and then was apprenticed to learn 
the baker's trade. Four years gave him standing as a master baker, and 
at the age of eighteen he ventured across the ocean and found a new 
home in the United States. In different cities he plied his trade for 
several years, and finally reached Portsmouth. He worked as a baker 
in this city until October, 1861, and then volunteered for service as a 
soldier. He enlisted in Company B of the Fifty-sixth Regiment of Ohio 
Volunteer Infantry, went to the front and later when his health failed 
he received an honorable discharge on account of disability, September 
30, 1862. Returning to Portsmouth, he remained only a short time and 
then started back to his old home in Germany. At Bissirigen, Wuer- 
temberg, he established a bakery and made bread for the people of that 
locality until 1868. Having in the meantime married, he returned to 
the United States with his wife and family, and again located at Ports- 
mouth and resumed acquaintance with friends whom he had made prior 
to the war. With the assistance of some friends he started a bakery on 
Front Street. It was a very small and modest enterprise, and after 
baking all the bread that his ovens would hold, he delivered the loaves 
to his customers in a basket which he carried about the streets. That 
was the beginning of an enterprise which vigorously prosecuted and 
with a wholesome product gradually expanded and in the course of 
years he became one of Portsmouth's successful business men. In 1889 
he bought property on Second Street and continued business there until 
his death in 1896. John Adam Pfau was married in Bissingen, Ger- 
many, to Johanna Schott, who was born in Bissingen, and is still living 
a resident of Portsmouth. She reared nine of her ten children, namely : 
]\Iary, wife of Charles Crane; John; Adam; Jacob; Lizzie; Rosa, wife 
of Arthur De Voss ; Charles ; Will ; and Laura. 

Adam Pfau attended the public schools at Portsmouth and when 
quite young began following his father about the shop and learning 
the details of the baker's trade. For several years, however, he was 
employed by Paden Brothers in their shoe factory, but eventually went 
to Dayton and was employed by a baker there and then worked in sev- 
eral different cities. His knowledge of the baking trade is based upon 
a thorough and ample experience, and in 1898 Mr. Pfau established 
a shop on Chillicothe Street in Portsmouth and remained there four 
years, and finally purchased property on Eleventh Street, where he 
now is proprietor of an establshment well named The Model Bakery. 

Mr. Pfau was married November 30, 1893, to Rosalie Lauffer. She 
was born in Portsmouth, a daughter of Frederick Lauffer, who was 
born in the Village of Loenburg, Wuertemberg, March 10, 1832, and 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 861 

M'as reared and educated in his native land. About the time he reached 
his majority he emigrated to America, and for several years operated 
a hotel located on the present site of the postoffice in Portsmouth. He 
lived in Portsmouth until his death. Frederick Lanffer married and was 
the father of several children, including jMrs. Pfau. Mr. and Mrs. 
Pfau have two daughters: Mildred and Hazel, both of whom are stu- 
dents in the Inter Mount College at Bristol, Virginia. I\Ir. Pfau was 
reared in the faith of the German Evangelical Church and now attends 
the Central Presbj'terian, in which his wife has membership. Frater- 
nally he is affiliated with Aurora Lodge No. 48, A. F. & A. M., witli 
Calvary Commandery No. 13, Knights Templar, and with Seneca Tril)e 
No. 17 of the Improved Order of Red ]\Ien. 

Mr. Pfau is well known among the master bakers of Ohio, and was 
one of the seven bakers who met at Columbus some j^ears ago and 
organized the Master Bakers' Association of Ohio. On the organization 
he was made a member of the executive committee, served in that capac- 
ity several years, and was also for several years treasurer of the organ- 
ization. 

James William Fitch, ]\I. D. Identified with one of the most 
exacting professions to which a man may devote his time and energies, 
James William Fitch, M. D., holds a noteworthy position among the 
active and successful physicians and surgeons of Portsmouth, Scioto 
County. He was born near Ashland, in Boyd County, Kentucky, which 
was also the birthplace of his father, George Fitch, and the part of 
Kentucky in which his grandfather, James Fitch, lo.cated as a pioneer. 

Nehemiah Fitch, the Doctor's great-grandfather, was a native of 
Pennsylvania, and a direct descendant, according to tradition, of one 
of two brothers named Fitch who came to America in early colonial 
times, and settled in New England, where one remained, the other 
removing to Pennsylvania, and there founding the branch of the Fitch 
family to which Doctor Fitch belongs. 

A native of Pennsylvania, James Fitch followed the tide of emigra- 
tion to Kentucky, and having bought land in Boyd County, was there 
engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. He married IMinerva 
Davidson, who belonged to a family of much prom.inence, her ancestors 
having been extensive landholders, owning large plantations which they 
operated with slave labor. 

Bom on the home farm, in Boyd County. Kentucky, in 1840, 
George Fitch was early initiated into the mysteries of farming, and in 
his earlier life owned and operated a farm lying about ten miles south 
of Ashland. Subsequently disposing of that property, he bought a 



862 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

farm in Greenup County, Kentucky, and was there prosperously en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1885. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Martin, was born in Boyd County, Kentucky, 
in 1842, a daughter of John Peebles and Sarah (Farmer) Martin, both 
of whom were born and reared in Pennsylvania, and died on the home 
farm in Boyd County, Kentucky, not far from Ashland. Mrs. George 
Fitch died at the age of sixty-eight years, leaving six children, as fol- 
lows : James "William, with whom this sketch is chiefly concerned ; 
Virginia; Edward, a physician in Russell, Kentucky; Sarah; Effie; 
and Samuel, who is engaged in the mercantile business at Ashland, 
Kentucky. 

Obtaining his preliminary education in the public schools of Greenup 
County, Kentucky, James William Fitch subsequently taught school 
five years in his native state, during which time he studied medicine 
with Dr. H. H. Warnock, of Greenupsburg. He then entered the School 
of Medicine at Louisville, and was there graduated with the class of 
1893. Beginning the practice of his profession at Wurtland, Greenup 
County, he continued there a year, and then settled at Russell, Ken- 
tucky, where he remained in successful practice for seven years. In 
1901, desirous of enlarging his scope of action. Doctor Fitch came to 
Scioto County, Ohio, locating in Portsmouth, where he has since won an 
enviable reputation for medical skill and ability, and has built up an 
extensive and remunerative patronage. He is an intelligent student, 
keeping up to the times in regard to the treatment of diseases, and in 
the practice of surgery, in 1903 having taken a postgraduate course in 
surgery in New Yoyk City. 

Doctor Fitch married, October 18, 1893, Ellen D. McCarty, who 
was born in Haverhill, Scioto County, Ohio, a daughter of Samuel and 
Minerva (Brown) McCarty, and into their home two children have been 
born, Clyde Marvin and Ruth. The Doctor is an active member and 
ex-president of the Hempstead Academy of Medicine ; a fellow of the 
American College of Surgeons; a member of the Ohio State Medical 
Society ; of the Ohio Clinical Association ; and of the American Medical 
Association. Fraternally he belongs to the Kjiights of Pythias. Polit- 
ically he is a republican, and religiously he is a member of the Bigelow 
Methodist Episcopal Church. 

John Milton Stockham. As president of the Stockham Ice and 
Cold Storage Company, and of the Scioto Sand Company, John Milton 
Stockham, of Portsmouth, is actively identified with two of the impor- 
tant industries of Scioto County, and is widely known as a representa- 
tive business man. A son of the late Joseph Harvey Stockham, he was 



HANGLNG ROCK IRON REGION 863 

born January 1, 1857, on a farm in Madison Township, Scioto County, 
a descendant of one of the brave Portsmouth pioneers who assisted in 
clearing the forests to make room for agriculture and civilization. His 
grandfather, Joseph Stockham, was a son of William Stockham, the 
founder of the Stockham family of Ohio. 

Born in Wales, William Stockham immigrated to America in 1777, 
settling in New Jersey, near Trenton, where he married Susanna Payne. 
In 1798, desirous of investing in land, he came westward to Ohio, jour- 
neying with his family overland with teams to Pittsburgh, thence down 
the Ohio River on flatboats to the mouth of the Scioto River. All of 
Ohio was then a dense wilderness, the happy hunting ground of the 
Indians. Landing on the present site of Portsmouth, he selected as a 
building spot the place now occupied by the residence of Judge Bannon. 
The log cabin which he erected in the forest as the first home of the 
Stockham family in Ohio was one of the very first log houses built in 
the county. He selected in the Scioto Valley a tract of land which later 
became known as the IMarsh farm, and which is now owned by Judge 
Bannon. The land at that time was very fertile, but the drainage was 
extremely poor, and in consequence the region roundabout was quite 
unhealthy. Therefore, in 1803, William Stockham removed with his 
family to Madison Township, secured land and was there a resident 
until his death, in 1815. His wife survived him. They reared several 
children, and their numerous descendants are represented in many 
different states. 

Joseph Stockham was born in New Jersey, June 25, 1784, and as 
a boy of fourteen years came with his parents to Scioto County. He 
subsequently assisted in clearing a homestead, and having obtained 
possession of a tract of land in IMadison Township, spent the best years 
of his useful life in redeeming from the wilderness a portion of this 
beautiful country, being engaged in agricultural pursuits until his 
death, in 1833, from cholera. His wife, whose maiden name was Hannah 
Bennett, was born April 16, 1786, and died June 13, 1863. Of the 
children born of their union, all are dead save one son, Samuel Stock- 
ham, who is now, in July, 1914, living in Texas, a venerable man of 
more than ninety years of age. 

Joseph Harvey Stockham was born March 17, 1817, on the home 
farm in Madison Township, and was reared to agricultural pursuits. 
When, in 1837-38, the courthouse was in process of construction at 
Portsmouth, he drove the oxen employed in drawing the pillars and 
the stone for the steps to the courthouse. When he was young, charcoal 
was the fuel used at the furnaces, and in early manhood he took con- 
tracts to cut the wood and burn the charcoal. Very successful in his 



864 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

operations, he aeeuraulated considerable money while thus employed, 
and wisely invested it in land, buying a partly improved farm lying 
11/2 miles north of Harrisonville, in Madison township. There he was 
afterwards prosperously engaged in general farming until his death, 
July 29, 1890. 

Joseph Harvey Stockham married Catherine Dewey, who was born 
February 13, 1823, a daughter of Joseph Dewey, and a descendant in 
the fifth generation from the immigrant ancestor, Thomas Dewey, the 
line of descent being as follows: Thomas (1), Israel (2), Israel (3), 
Joseph (4) and Catherine (5). Admiral George Dewey is also a 
descendant in the seventh generation from Thomas (1) Dewey. 
Thomas (1) Dewey settled in Westfield, Connecticut, about 1639. Israel 
(2) Dewey married Abigail Drake, and both he and his son, Israel (3) 
Dewey, who married A])igail Ingraham, were as far as known lifelong 
residents of Connecticut. Joseph (4) Dewey was born in Stonington, 
Connecticut, July 4, 1781, and as a young man migrated to Ohio, 
])ecoming a pioneer of Scioto County. He spent the later years of his 
life in Harrisonville, Ohio, dying June 3, 1839. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Roxana P. Tenner, was born near Baltimore, Maryland, 
August 7, 1794, and in 1800 was brought to Ohio by her parents, who 
were among the original settlers of Adams County. She survived her 
husband many years, dying January 17, 1877. Catherine (5) Dewey 
was well trained by her mother in all the domestic arts, becoming not 
only a superior cook and housekeeper, but learning to spin and weave, 
and until her children were all well grown spun and wove the cloth 
from which she fashioned their garments. She died February 2, 1847, 
leaving eleven children, namely : Joseph Dewey, Caroline M., Ann 
Eliza, George Washington, Roxana E., John Milton, Maria E., Mary 
Catherine, David Harvey, Samuel Taylor and Sarah Ella. All of these 
children were living in July, 1914, the youngest child being then forty- 
seven years of age. 

Beginning when young to assist his father on the farm, John Milton 
Stockham remained an inmate of the parental household until twenty 
years old, when he entered the employ of ]\I. B. Gilbert, a wholesale 
grocer, with whom he remained a year. Marrying then, ]\Ir. Stockham 
farmed with his father for twelve months, and then moved to Texas, 
where, a year later, his wife died, leaving an infant two and one-half 
months old. Returning to his old home, Mr. Stockham again entered 
the employ of Mr. Gilbert, with whom he remained seven yeare. Resign- 
ing his position at that time, he embarked in the coal business, which 
he carried on successfully until 1913. In the meantime Mr. Stockham 
had become associated with the ice business, and in 1903 had iucorpo- 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 865 

rated it under the name of the Stoekham Ice and Cold Storage Com- 
pany, of wliieh he has since been the president. This company has an 
extensive cold storage plant, and deals extensively in fruit and produce, 
having a large and lucrative patronage. ]Mr. Stoekham is likewise presi- 
dent of the Scioto Sand Company, which owns the Larkins estate, and 
is much interested in the culture of fruit, having, in Union Township, 
a fine orchard of 6,000 trees, all of them young trees, but some of them 
quite productive. 

Mr. Stoekham married first, at the age of twenty-one years, Augusta 
Frowein, who died two years later, and their only child lived but five 
months. ^Ir. Stoekham married second, October 13, 1883, Helen 
McAleer, a daughter of John and Helen Jane (Edwards) McAleer, the 
former of whom was born in Ireland, of Scotch ancestry, and the latter 
in Virginia, of Scotch descent. Mr. and Mrs. Stoekham have five chil- 
dren, namely : Vesta, Russell, Katherine, Paul and Violet. Ru.ssell 
married ]Mary Powell, and they have one child, John Russell, Jr. ^Ir. 
and ]\Irs. Stockliam are members of the Trinity ^Methodist Episcopal 
Church. 

John W. Hall. The efficient and popular clei'k of the courts of 
Scioto County is a scion of an old and honored pioneer family of South- 
ern Ohio, both his paternal and maternal ancestors having settled in 
the Buckeye State at an early period of its history. 

John Wikotf Hall was born on the old Wikoff homestead, on the 
banks of the Ohio River, in Green Township, Adams County, Ohio, and 
the date of his nativity was June 30, 1861. In the same township his 
father, Charles N. Hall, was born in the year 1840, a son of James H. 
Hall, who Avas born at Logan's Gap, Brown County, this state, the 
latter 's father, Benjamin Hall, having been a native of Wales and hav- 
ing come to America when a young man. For a short interval after 
his arrival in this country Benjamin Hall was a resident of Pennsyl- 
vania, and finally he turned his attention to the building of flat and keel 
boats for transportation service on the Ohio River, down which stream 
he came to establish his home at Logan's Gap, where he became one of 
the first settlers of Brown County, Ohio. For many years after his 
arrival in this state there were no canal or railroad systems in operation 
in Ohio and the only availal)le markets for the products of the pioneer 
settlers were the southern cities that could be reached by means of the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Benjamin Hall himself .built many flat- 
boats which he personally used in the transportation of produce down 
the two rivers, and he usually made New Orleans his destination and 
market. There he also sold his boats, which could not feasililv be taken 



866 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

back up the rivers, and his return trips were customarily made on foot. 
On one of these return journeys through a virtual wilderness he disap- 
peared and his family thereafter found no trace of him, the supposition 
being that he was robbed and murdered en route. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Shelton, survived him by a few years and left three 
sons and two daughters, James H., Harry, Benjamin and the daughters, 
who eventually became respectively Mrs. Lewis and Mrs. "Wilson Case. 
James H. Hall was reared to adult age in Brown County and finally 
removed thence to Adams County, where he purchased a tract of heavily 
timbered land about one and one-half miles north of the present Village 
of Rome. On this pioneer and embryonic farmstead he erected a log 
house of the primitive type common to the locality and period, and 
after clearing an appreciable portion of his land he sold the property 
at a profit and purchased another wild tract, in Jefferson TowTiship, 
that county. There he erected and placed in operation a sawmill, and he 
successfully engaged in the manufacturing of lumber, in addition to 
giving due attention to the reclamation and cultivation of his farm. 
After the death of his wife he sold this homestead and removed to 
Rarden Township, Scioto County, where he became associated with his 
son, James H., Jr., in the purchase of 1,000 acres of land that had been 
set aside to aid in the founding and support of the state university. 
The father and son gave themselves vigorously to the reclamation of this 
land, a large part of which they cleared and improved, and after there 
maintaining their home for a number of years they removed to Atchison 
County, Missouri, and purchased land. Five years later they extended 
their pioneer activities into Nemaha County, Nebraska, where they 
bought a large tract of land and where. James H. Hall, Sr., grandfather 
of the subject of this review, died in 1899, in his ninetieth year. He 
retained his mental and physical powers to a wonderful extent and was 
hale and active until within a very short time before his demise. His 
wife, whose maiden name was Angeline Shelton, was born in Huntington 
ToANTiship, Brown County, Ohio, and there her death occurred in 1869, 
their children having been Charles N., William S., Elisha P., James H., 
George A., Phoebe, Susan and INIary. Phoebe first married Willis 
Robinson, who sacrificed his life while serving as a soldier of the Union 
in the Civil war, and his widow later became the wife of Benjamin 
Johnson. Susan likewise was twice wedded, and her first husband, 
named Robinson, also lost his life in the Civil war, after which she 
became the wife of George Shively. ^Mary married Newton Robinson. 

Charles N. Hall was reared and educated in Adams County and 
there continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits until the 
Civil war was precipitated and gave to him the call of higher duty. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 867 

On tlie 9th of August, 1862, he enlisted as a private in Company I, 
Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and he was chosen first sergeant 
of his company. In 1864 he was promoted second lieutenant and later 
in the same year attained to the rank of first lieutenant. He was with 
his gallant regiment in all of its marches, campaigns and battles up to 
tile time he was incapacitated by wounds, and among the more impor- 
tant engagements in which he took part may be mentioned the following : 
Buffalo, West Virginia; Fayetteville, Blake's Farm, Cloydy's Mountain, 
New River Bridge, Cow Pasture River, Lynchburg, Winchester, Vir- 
ginia ; and Martinsburg and Opequan Creek, West Virginia. In the 
last named conflict he was severely wounded and was incapacitated for 
further service in the field. He received his honorable discharge on 
the 21st of March, 1865, on account of disability. 

After his return to Adams County the valiant young soldier was 
elected county clerk, of which office he continued the efficient incumbent 
for six years, and thereafter he served one term as county sheriff. He 
then assumed a clerkship in the office of the secretary of state, at 
C^olumbus, and later he had the distinction of serving as librarian of 
the state law library. This position he resigned in 1877, in which year 
he returned to his farm in Adams County, where he continued to reside 
until his death, on the 28th of January, 1909. 

As a young man Charles N. Hall wedded Miss Calista Wikoft", who 
was born on the Wikoff homestead farm, in Green Township, Adams 
County, and who was a daughter of John AV. and Nancy (Jones) Wikoft", 
both of whom were born and reared in Shelby County, Kentucky, wiiere 
their marriage was solemnized. John W. Wikoff was a son of Peter 
Wikoff, who was a native of Wales and who came to America when a 
young man, his home having soon afterward been established in Shelby 
County, Kentucky, where he resided for a term of years. He then 
came to Adams County, Ohio, and purchased land near Cedar Mills, 
tliis homestead continuing to be his place of abode until his death. 
I'pon coming to Adams County, Ohio, John W^. Wikoff purchased a tract 
of land in Green Township, his fine old farmstead being pieturescjuely 
situated on the banks of the Ohio River, and there he continued to be 
successfully engaged in farming until his death, in 1861, as the result 
of an accident. His widow long survived him and was summoned to the 
life eternal in 1887, the four children of their union who attained to 
maturity having been Allen T., IMilton, Owen R. and Calista. Allen 
T. Wikoff became a prominent member of the Ohio bar and was infiuen- 
tial in public, affairs. He served as secretary of state and also as 
cidjutant-general of Ohio, besides having been a valued member of the 
Ohio Canal Commission for several years. Mrs. Calista (Wikoff) Hall, 



868 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

a woman of most gentle and gracious personality, died on the 28th of 
January, 1909, after having reared six children — John W. ; Eldora; 
Mary, who died at the age of nineteen years; Margaret, who died in 
1889 ; William A., who died in 1891 ; and Charles N. 

John W. Hall acquired his early education in the public schools of 
West Union, Adams County, and after his father assumed a state office 
and removed to Columbus, he entered the high school in the capital city, 
being there graduated as a member of the class of 1876. He then 
entered the Ohio Agricultural & Mechanical College, which is now a 
part of the University of Ohio, and in this institution he was graduated 
in 1879. Mr. Hall then put his scholastic attainments to practical test 
and utilization by enrolling himself as an active member of the peda- 
gogic profession. His first term of service as a teacher was in Liberty 
District, Jefferson Township, Adams County ; and his second term found 
him master of the school in District No. 9, of the same township. He 
then assumed a clerical position in the pension office at Columbus, and 
after serving two years he was for eighteen months a clerk in the 
Columbus offices of the Hocking Valley Railroad. After the death of 
his mother he remained one year on the old homestead farm, and during 
the following three years he was in the West, principally in Missouri 
and Kansas. 

In 1888 Mr. Hall purchased a farm in Nile Township, Scioto. County, 
Ohio, and there he was actively and successfully engaged in diversified 
farming and stock-growing until 1910, when he rented the farm and 
accepted the office of superintendent of the county infirmary, in Wash- 
ington Township. There he remained, as an efficient, considerate and 
valued executive, until May, 1914, when he resigned his office, after 
having served four years and three months. He then became the repub- 
lican candidate for the office of clerk of the courts of this county, a 
position to which he was elected in November of that year, by a large 
and gratifying majority that attested his staunch hold upon the confi- 
dence and esteem of the voters of the county. He has since maintained 
his residence at Portsmouth, the judicial center of the county, though 
he still retains possession of his well improved and valuable farm, in 
Green Township. 

Mr. Hall's first presidential vote was cast in support of Hon. James 
G. Blaine, and since that time he has continued a stalwart and effective 
advocate of the principles of the republican party. Both he and his 
wife are members of the First Christian Church of Portsmouth, and 
he is affiliated with the following named fraternal organizations : Rome 
Lodge, No. 535, Free & Accepted IMasons; Buena Vista Lodge, No. 
842, and Oriental Encampment, No. 26, of the Independent Order of 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 869 

Odd Fellows; Portsmouth Court, No. 109, Tribe of Ben Hur : and Peer- 
less Lodge, Loyal Order of Moose. 

In 1885 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Hall to Miss Elizabeth 
Kuntz, who was born and reared in Brown County, a daughter of John 
J. and Elizabeth (Glass) Kuntz, representatives of staunch Pennsyl- 
vania German stock. Mr. and Mrs. Hall have five children, Horace L., 
Grace, Bessie, Susan and Lulu. Horace, the only son, married Miss 
Elizabeth Doyle and they now reside in the State of California. 

William E. Cook. For eight years a member of the Portsmouth 
city council, for the past two decades successfully engaged in business 
in that city, William E. Cook has spent all his life in the Hanging 
Rock Iron Region and represents a family of sterling, thrifty and influ- 
ential German- American citizens in this section of the state. 

William E. Cook was born near Hanging Rock, in Lawrence County, 
a son of the last William Cook, who was bom in Hanover, Germany, 
where the name was spelled Kuch. The grandparents spent all their 
lives in Hanover and William E. and a brother, who settled at Mount 
Carmel, Illinois, were the only members of the family who came to 
America. William Cook was reared on a farm in Germany, attended 
school steadily as a boy, and when abovit nineteen years of age left his 
fatherland, took passage on a sailing vessel, and eleven weeks later, 
after a somewhat stormy and tedious voyage, was landed at Baltimore. 
His arrival was in the year 1847. Times were very hard at that time, 
money scarce, and as a stranger in a strange land with a knowledge 
only of the German tongue, had many difficulties. He made his way 
gradually to Pittsburg and finding no employment there started on 
afoot and walked the entire distance to Cincinnati. On a farm near 
that city he found employment, and a few years later went to Hanging 
Rock, and was one of the first Germans to locate in that community. He 
gradually acquired a serviceable knowledge of the English language, 
and became very helpful to the Germans who afterwards came to this 
community and usually made their headquarters at his home. For a 
number of years William Cook was in the employ of John Peebles and 
Robert Hamilton and lived in Lawrence County until his death at the 
age of seventy-four. William Cook married Elizabeth Harmeyer, who 
was also born in Hanover, Germany. Her parents came to America, 
bringing several children, and were fourteen weeks on a sailing vessel. 
They located at Cincinnati and soon afterwards the cholera scourge took 
away IMrs. Cook's mother, father and brother. She was left alone and 
found a home with an English family. Three years later she went to 
Hanging Rock where she met and married a ]\Ir. Mentor, who lived only 



870 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

a few years. Her second husband was William Cook. She survived 
him and died at the age of eighty years. By her first marriage she had 
a daughter named Elizabeth, and by her marriage to William Cook 
she became the mother of two daughters and one son, named Minnie, 
Maggie and William E. 

William E. Cook grew up in the vicinity of his father's home, 
attended public school and at the age of fifteen began working in a 
coal mine operated by his father. In a short time he left mining to 
learn the moulder's trade. I"n 1879 Mr. Cook moved to Portsmouth, and 
followed his trade in that city until 1893, at which time he opened 
business as a provision dealer, and has been successfully engaged along 
that line for more than twenty years. 

In 1880 I\Ir. Cook married Louise Droege, a daughter of John F. 
and Dorothy (Feidler) Droege. John F. Droege was born in Hanover, 
(iermany, February 13, 1813, and was the only member of his father's 
family to come to America. He was reared and educated in his native 
land, and in 1836 landed at Baltimore, and from there came West by 
way of Wheeling to Cincinnati. In 1842 he returned to Germany, but 
after four years in the old country came back to America in 1846 and 
set up in the jewelry business in Cincinnati. In 1853 he moved to 
Portsmouth, bought a farm of sixteen acres all of which is now included 
within the city, and combined farming with the jewelry business and 
died at Portsmouth in 1894 at the age of eighty years. His wife died 
at the age of eighty-five and they reared five of their children. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cook have three children: Nora, Bertha and Walter. Mr. 
and Mrs. Cook are members of the German Evangelical Church and 
have reared their family in that faith. 

William C, Hazlebeck. Energetic, enterprising, and eminently 
capable. William C. Hazlebeck is actively associated with the financial 
interests of Portsmouth, his home city, as attorney for the Royal Loan 
and Savings Company, and treasurer and manager of the Hazlebeck 
Company. He was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, June 10, 3 883. 

William Hazlebeck, the father of William C, was born in Toledo, 
and was left an orphan at an early age, his father dying while he was 
yet an infant, and his mother when he was nine years of age. Becoming 
self-supporting from the time of his mother's death, he worked at 
various employments for a time, and later served an apprenticeship 
at the moulder's trade. Soon after the breaking out of tlie Civil war 
he enlisted as ])ugler in the Eleventh Ohio Volunteer Cavalry. At that 
time all of the country west of the Missouri River, and north of the 
Red Rivei", to California was under territorial government, and inhab- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 871 

ited by bands of hostile Indians. His regiment was sent West, and be 
was with his command in all the engagements with the savages until 
the expiration of his term of enlistment, a period of three years, takintr 
part in many a bloody warfare. Returning to Ohio, he subsequently 
worked at his trade in various places until his death, wiiich oecurrcil 
at Portsmouth in 1901. The maiden name of his wife was Caroline 
Eppler. She was a daughter of Casper Eppler, who was born in Wur- 
temberg, Germany, and as a young man emigrated to America, locating 
first in Cincinnati, and later settling permanently in Portsmouth, wlnTe 
his death occurred, in 1901, at the age of seventy-three years. JMr. 
Eppler married Frederica Ijarbara Doerr, who was born in Wurtem- 
berg, Germany, and came to Cincinnati when a girl, and there living 
until her marriage. She died in 1881, at the age of fifty-nine years, 
leaving four childi^n, Louisa, Charles, Katherine and Caroline. 

After his graduation from the Portsmouth high school, in 1901. 
William C. Ilazlebeck was for two years in the employ of the Selby 
Shoe Company. A man of his mental calibre, however, naturally turns 
to a professional career, his choice leading him to take up the study of 
law. Entering, therefore, the law department of the Ohio State Uni- 
"^ersity, Mr. Ilazlebeck was there graduated with the class of 1906, and 
during the same year was admitted to the bar. He subsequently spent 
three months in the office of T. C. Beatty and became associated with Mr. 
Frank B. Finney as assistant secretary of the Royal Loan & Savings 
Company. On the death of i\Ir. Finney he became secretary and attorney 
of that company, and likewise manager of the Frank B. Finney Com- 
pany. This company has been since changed to the Hazlebeck Company, 
and is successfully carrying on a general real estate and insui-aiice 
business. 

]\Ir. Hazlebeck married, in 1908, ]\Iiss Sadie Louise Knost, who was 
born in Bloom Township, Scioto County, a daughter of Louis and Char- 
lotte (Gulker) Knost. Mr. and Mrs. Hazlebeck have three children, 
Caroline Charlotte, ^lary Louise, and William C, Jr. Politically Mr. 
Hazlebeck is afifiliated with the republican party, and for seven years 
has served as clerk of the local school board. True to the religious faith 
in which they were reared Mr. and Mi*s. Hazlebeck are active members 
of the German Evangelical Church. Mr. Hazlebeck has served for four 
years as president of the Ohio Evangelical League, connected with his 
church, and is secretary of the Ohio Federation of Brotherhood of the 
same church, and also national treasurer of the National Brotherhood. 
Fraternally he is a member of Magnolia Lodge, No. 390, Knights of 
Pythias and of Aurora Lodge, No. 48, F. & A. M. 



S72 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Hejcry J. Wendelken. By reason of his long and successful career 
as a merchant, Henry J. Wendelken has a place firmly established in 
the confidence and esteem of the people of Portsmouth, and his name 
has for years 1ieen associated with mercantile effort on an advanced and 
large scale, either through his own activities or through that of other 
members of his family. 

Henry J. Wendelken was Ijorn in ^larietta, Ohio, a son- of Martin 
and Adaline Wendelken, a family whose career is further sketched in 
the biography of John M. Wendelken, found on other pages of this 
publication. Henry J. Wendelken was reared and educated in his native 
city, and when a young boy began assisting his father in the store, and 
thus learned the details of merchandising. Having acquired a practical 
vocation and a training that would stand him in good stead when he 
left home, in 1877, he came to Portsmouth and engaged in the grocery- 
business with John ]\Iaule. Their place of business was out towards 
the edge of the city at that time, at the corner of Ninth and Chillicothe 
streets. Portsmouth thirty-five years ago, when they began this business, 
was a comparatively small place, and nearly all the business and manu- 
facturing were concentrated along Front and Second streets. After 
a year Mr. Wendelken sold his interests to his partner and opened 
another store at the corner of Eighth and Gay streets. In 1883 he 
bought a store at the corner of Gay and Gallia streets, and moved the 
stock of his former store on Eighth Street to the new location. Two 
years of considerable prosperity followed him in his new location and 
he then engaged in business with his brother John M. at the lower end 
of Second Street. This was a partnership of about two years, and his 
retirement was the result of ill health. On recuperating he bought the 
grocery business of his father-in-law at the corner of Ninth and Chilli- 
cothe streets, and was proprietor of that establishment until 1903. In 
that year Mr. Wendelken sold out to Mr. L. C. Cook, was retired until 
1905, and then in company with George Carroll opened a new enterprise 
as a shoe repair shop, and was in that business for two years. In 1907 
]\Ir. Wendelken bought the grocery' store of Fred Gabler at 1702 Gallia 
Street, and has continued successfully in that line to the present time. 
His son Earl is now associated with him and carries considerable burden 
of the store management. 

On September 3, 1877, Mr. Wendelken married Emma 0. Maule. 
She was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, a daughter of John Maulc, who was 
a native of Germany and on coming to America located in Chillicothe, 
spent a few years there and then moved to Portsmouth and engaged 
in the grocery trade until the end of his life. John Maule married 
Ottilia Washco, who was also a native of Germany. Mr. and Mr. Wen- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 873 

delken have reared five children : Bertha, bow deceased ; Sadie, who 
married Herbert Steinboch and lives in Norwood, Ohio, and has a sou 
named Harold ; Earl, who is associated with his father in business and 
bv bis marriage to Effie Worley has three children — Frances, Herbert 
and Esther May. Martin J., who is engaged in the insurance business 
and married Carrie Nickel and bas a daughter Ruth; Leroy, who is in 
tlie jewelry business in Portsmouth and by his marriage to Irene Racy 
has two children, Helen and Robert. j\Ir. and Mrs. Wendelken and 
children are all members of the Fourth Street Methodist Episcopal 
Church, excepting Earl Wendelken, who has his membership in the 
Bigelow Methodist. The family are Avell known for their activities as 
business men and citizens and the name is associated with true worth 
and public spirit. 

William Harkison Wagner. A veteran of three wars, Capt. William 
11. Wagner, of Portsmouth, Scioto County, met with many a thrilling 
experience during his varied career, and a recital of the scenes through 
which he passed would furnish sufficient material for an exciting and 
interesting tale of romance. A son of Jacob Wagner, he was bom, 
April 6, 1830, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, which was also the birth- 
place of his father. 

Peter Wagner, grandfatlier, was l)orn in Alsace, France, and on 
coming to the United States settled in Philadelphia, where he was en- 
gaged in the ice business until his death. He married Elizabeth Cook, 
who was born and reared in Alsace, Germany, and to them four sons and 
five daughters were born. 

During his earlier life Jacob Wagner was engaged in the ice busi- 
iKiss in his native city, at first being associated with his father. Leaving 
Philadelphia in 1842 he crossed the Mississippi, and for three or four 
years resided in the Territory of Iowa. Returning then to Philadelphia, 
he remained there until the breaking out of the Mexican war, when he 
enlisted in the Logan Guards, and with his command went to Mexico, 
where he did his duty as a brave soldier until the close of the war. 
Receiving his honorable discharge, he returned to Philadelphia, but 
shortly afterwards bought land in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, and was 
there engaged in agricultural pursuits for many years, living on his 
farm until his death, in 1880, at the venerable age of ninety-six years. 
His wife, whose inaiden name was Hannah Kane, was bom in Pennsyl- 
vania. She died at the early age of thirty-eight years, leaving eight 
children. 

Ticaving school at the age of eleven years, William H. Wagner secured 
work at the Baldwin Locomotive Works, in Philadelphia, and was there 



874 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

employed until war with Mexico was declared. Entering then the Logan 
Guards as a drummer boy, he marched with his command to Pittsburgli, 
from there going by boat down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New 
Orleans, and thence via the Giilf of Vera Cruz, from there marching 
with his comrades to the City of Mexico, a distance of two hundred and 
sixty miles. Continuing with his command in all of its marches, cam- 
paigns and battles until the close of the conflict, he then returned to 
Philadelphia, and was honorably discharged. Resuming his former 
position in the Baldwin Locomotive Works, Mr. Wagner, still a beard- 
less youth, remained with that company until 1851, when he entered tlie 
employ of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as fireman. He was 
soon promoted to engineer, and given a run between Columbia and 
Philadelphia. 

Going westward to Independence, Missouri, in 3855, Mr. Wagner 
there enlisted in the Second United States Cavalry, and went into 
camp for the winter in the Northwest Territory. In the spring of 1856 
he was one of a band of forty soldiers that went out on a buffalo hunt. 
This little company of hunters was subsequently surprised by a band of 
one thousand or more redskins, who gave battle. Although the brave 
soldiers killed many of the Indians, twenty-eight of the forty soldiei-s 
lost their lives, and the remaining twelve were taken prisoners by the 
savages, who tortured and burned eight of their captives, the remaining 
four soldiers witnessing the brutal treatment given their comrades. Mr. 
Wagner was one of the four saved, and he was held in captivity for 
two and one-half years, during which time he became familiar with the 
Indian language, and learned the art of making Indian medicines. 

Escaping from his captors, Mr. Wagner waded a stream for several 
miles in order to avoid the dogs. He was without food, but finally killed 
a wolf with his sword, and sucked its lilood. Skinning the wolf, he kept 
a quarter of the carcass for future use, and ate some of the meat raw. 
Running across a mountain lion, he threw away the wolf meat, and 
escaped by swimming a stream. Subseriuently catching a fish, he built 
a fire .with some punk, and having covered the fish with nmd baked it in 
the coals, and had one of the l)est meals he ever enjoyed. At the end of 
thirteen days, he rejoined his regiment, with which he remained until 
1860. Receiving his honorable discharge from the service in Januai'y 
of that year, he returned to Philadelphia, and resumed work as mu 
engineer. In April, 1861, Mr. AVagner enlisted for three months in 
(Jompany B, First Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry, and took part in 
the battle of Bull Run. His term of enlistment expiring while he wms 
still in the field, Mr. Wagner enlisted in Company A, First Pennsylvania 
Cavalry, under Captain Robinson, and with his comrades was at the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 875 

front in many of the more important engagements of the war, among 
them having been the battles at Culpeper, Spottsylvania, Antietam, 
Kelleys Ford, Gettysburg, Brandy Station, and at Port Republic. He 
participated- in twenty-six engagements, and was seven times wounded, 
in the battle of Bull Run receiving a saber wound in the side. In 
October, 1864, he was honorably discharged on account of disability 
arising from his numerous wounds. 

Returning North, Mr. Wagner went to Huntington, West Virginia, 
to live, and on recovering his health resumed work as an engineer. In 
1884 he accepted a position in (Juba as master mechanic on the Cuba 
Central Railroad, and was there thus employed until the blowing up of 
the Maine, on February 15, 1898. Returning to the United States, he 
lived first in Charleston, and later in Huntington, West Virginia, from 
the latter place, in 1899, coming to Portsmouth, Ohio, which has since 
been his home. The Captain has on Second Street a laboratory in which 
he compounds Indian medicines, and in his office he has one of the 
most valuable collection of Indian relics privately owned in the woild. 
He is a member of the G. A. R. and an ex-commander, and in the Masonic 
order has attained the thirty-third degree, which he received in 
London, England. He is an ex-grand master of the thirty-thii-d 
degree in Philadelphia. He also belongs to the Independent Order of 
Odd Fellows and to the Knights of Pythias. 

Captain Wagner has been twice married. He married fii\st, in I860, 
Sarah Pheasant, who was born in Huntington, West Virginia, and died 
February 28, 1912. The maiden name of the Captain's second wife was 
Sarah Rucker. She was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, a daughter of 
Elias and Margaret (Webb) Rucker, and a granddaughter on tlie 
maternal side of James and Sarah (Brown) Wel^l), who came from 
North Carolina to Lawrence county, Ohio, in early pioneer days, and 
taking up land from the Government hewed a farui from the wilder- 
ness. By his first marriage Captain AVagner had one son, Harry Wag- 
ner, of Portsmouth. Harry Wagner married Mary Shaffer, and they 
have six children, namely: Pearl, Elsie, Harry, Charles, .Mbert, and 
Richard. 

IjESLIe C. Turley. Possessing an unlimited amount of energy. Leslit- 
C. Turley occupies a place of prominence among the progressive bnsi 
ness men of Portsmouth, his dealings with widely extended interests 
and enterprises being ever governed by the highest principles of integ- 
rity. "He was born in Portsmouth, November 11, 1862. the youngest 
son of Col. John Alexander Turley, and grandson of Dr. Charles 
Augustine Turley, both natives of Virginia. He is of pure Scotcli 



876 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

liufage, his ancestors having been Scotch Royalists in the war between 
the Stuarts and Cromwell, and subsequently settled in County Ulster, 
Ireland, "Where they were granted a tract of land during the reign of 
Charles the Second. 

In 1720 Charles Turley, the great grandfather of Leslie C, with 
his brother William, emigrated from Londonderry, Ireland, to America, 
lauding at Baltimore, IMaryland, and from there going to Alexandria, 
Virginia. He afterwards located in Loudoun County, Virginia, on a 
tract of land granted him by Lord Fairfax, and to his plantation gave 
the name of Woodville. He there married Ann Lee Coekerell, a daugh- 
ter of Col. Richard Henry and. Ann (Lee) Coekerell, and a niece of 
"Light-Horse Harry" Lee. 

Dr. Charles Augustine Turley was born, April 4, 1788, at Pleasant 
Valley, Loudoun County, Virginia, on his father's plantation, "Wood- 
ville." Scholarly in his tastes and ambitions, he was afforded every 
opportunity for obtaining an education, being graduated from both 
the William and Mary College, and from the Philadelphia Medical Col- 
lege. In 1813 he located at Moorefield, Hardy County, in what is now 
West Virginia, and was there successfully engaged in the practice of 
liis chosen profession for many years. He married Fanny Harness, a 
daughter of George Harness, Jr., and Rebecca (Cary) Harness. 

Col. John Alexander Turley was born at Moorefield, Hardy County, 
Virginia, June 1, 1816, and was educated at William and Mary College. 
Seized with the wanderlust when young, he came to Ohio in 1836, set- 
tling in Scioto Township, upon a magnificent tract of land which was 
given him by his father. In 1856, he sold this to George Davis. A man 
of strong character, pronounced in his opinions, he soon became active 
in public affairs, and in 1840 was elected justice of the peace, an office 
which he filled three years. In 1846 he was elected as representative to 
tlie State Legislature from Scioto and Lawrence counties, and while 
scj'ving in that capacity was ever loyal to the interests of his constituents. 
Ill 1851 he had the distinction of organizing the first school board in 
Clay Township. At the outbreak of the war between the states he was 
serving as brigade inspector, with rank of major, having been appointed 
liy Governor Chase. 

On April 27, 1861. Colonel Turley enlisted in Company G, Twenty- 
second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for three months, and was commis- 
sioned captain of his company. On May 8, 1861, he had a third com- 
])any ready for service in the field. On August 19, 1861 , he was appointed 
lieutenant colonel of the Eighty-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and 
resigned the position December 9th of that year. On August 22, 1862, 
lie was commissioned colonel of the Ninety-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 877 

The colonel participated in many important engagements in Virginia 
and West Virginia, among which we may mention the following: Those 
at Buffalo, Fayetteville. Blake's Farm, New' River Bridge, Cow Pasture 
and at Lynchburg, where he was severely wounded, being incapacitated 
for active service. Colonel Turley was honorably discharged from the 
army on November 4, 1864, and on March 13, 1865, for gallant conduct on 
the field of battle, was breveted brigadier-general. Returning to Ports- 
mouth, Colonel Turley again became pi'ominent in public matters, serv- 
ing as a member of the city council and of the Portsmouth board of 
education, and as mayor of the city from 1871 until 1873, and again 
from 1887 until 1889. 

Colonel Turley married, Januar>^ 2, 1843, Charlotte E. Robinson, a 
daughter of Joshua V. and Hannah (Cooper) Robinson. Colonel 
Tnrley died March 19, 1900, and ]\Irs. Turley has also passed to the 
liigher life. They were the parents of six children, two dying in infancy, 
tile other four being Augustus R. ; Henry Clay-. Leslie C, the special 
sub.ject of this sketch ; and Charlotte, wife of Hon. Albert C. Thompson. 

Leslie C. Turley was educated in the schools of Poi-tsmouth, and at 
the Ohio State University. In 1880, at the age of nineteen years, he 
began his career in the fire-brick business, being first with W. Q. Adams, 
who was then president of the Hocking Valley Fire Brick Company, 
which later became the Portsmouth Fire Brick Company. At the end 
of ten years having sei"ved several years as secretary of that company, 
]\Ir. Turley left that firm, and the ensuing ten years was with George 
Davis and W. G. Bierley and later with J. L. Watkins, Jr., at the 
Kentucky Fire Brick Company, located at Firebrick, Lewis County, 
Kentucky, afterwards being connected with the consolidation of the 
Kentucky Fire Brick Company, with the South Webster Fire Brick 
Company at South Webster, Ohio, the Star Fire Brick. Works, and 
the Blast Furnace Fire Brick Works, at Sciotoville, and the Portsmouth 
Fire Brick Company, as vice president and general manager for two 
years, when it was merged with the Harbison- Walker Refractories Com- 
])any. The Portsmouth and the Kentucky Fire Brick Company was the 
name of the consolidation, then absorbed by the Harbison-Walker Re- 
fractories Company, the largest company in the world engaged in the 
manufacture of refractory materials. After their consolidation with 
tlie Pittsburgh properties he became a director in the new corporation. 
He is now, in July, 1916, occupying the same position, with the title 
of "Director of the Portsmouth district." 

Mr. Turley is likewise prominently identified witli other large enter- 
]irises. In 1900. with othei's, he purchased the land belonging to the 
old Washington Furnace Company, and an interest in the land of the 



878 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Cambria Furnace Company, and the Black Pork Coal Company, which 
has been succeeded by the Cambria Clay Products Company. He and 
others also purchased and now own the lands of the former Pioneer Fur- 
nace Company. The lands of the Pioneer Furnace Company, the Wasli- 
ington Furnace Company, and the Cambria Furnace Company, are 
adjacent properties, located in Scioto and Lawrence counties, in the 
original Hanging Rock Iron Region. "Sir. Turley also boujilit for the 
Harbison-Walker Refractories Company all of the lands of the old 
Kenton Furnace Company, in (Jreenup County, Kentucky, it being 
property of considerable value to tlie company because of flint tire clays 
in quantity. 

For a number of years Mr. Turley has been president of The Ports- 
mouth Engine Company plant, located in the AVest End of Portsmouth, 
and is actively interested in the manufacture of limestone products in 
Kentucky, and in various other imi)ortant enterprises. He is likewise 
a large owner of city and suburban real estate, and to each of his varied 
enterprises and interests he gives his personal attention. For thirty- 
three consecutive years he has been intimately connected witli the man\i- 
facture of fire brick, one of the most important industries in the entire 
state. Mr. Turley served as president of the First National Bank of 
Portsmouth from 1905 until 1910. He was for a long time a meml)er 
of the city council, for three years, serving as president of that body. 
A republican in politics, he cast his first presidential vote for James G. 
Blaine. 

Mr. Txarley married, November 11, 1890, Retta Reed, daughter of 
Samuel and Ellen (Kinney) Reed, of wlioiii a sketdi may be found 
elsewhere in this volume. Two children have blessed the union of Mr. 
and Mrs. Turley, namely: Charles Leslie, who was graduated from the 
University School at Cleveland, and in the mechanical course at ('or- 
nell University; and Nell, who was graduated from Laurel School, in 
Cleveland, and at the time of writing, is now continuing her studies at 
Maderia College, in Washington, D. C. 

Frederick G. Leete. The active career of Frederick <i. Leet<' as -a 
civil and mining engineer and business man in Lawivnce County began 
more than thirty ye'ars ago, and in that time he has won a high position 
in his profession, being the author of numerous newspaper, i)amphle1 
and magazine articles on the Geological Structure and Resources of 
Southern Ohio. He is one of the most useful and influentiHl citizens 
of Ironton. 

For many years Mr. Leete has given special attention to the prac- 
ticabilities of the running waters of the state and his broad observations 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 879 

and inforinatioii along that line eventuated in a conspicuous service to 
tlie state during the last constitutional convention of Ohio, in which he 
served as delegate from Lawrence County. Mr. Leete has made a 
thorough study of the general problem of conservation and development 
of water power in Ohio, and went into the convention as one of the 
acknowledged leaders of the conservation forces. He succeeded in hav- 
ing written in the organic law of the state a clause giving the Legisla- 
ture power to pass laws providing "for the conservation of the natural 
resources of the State, including streams, lakes, submerged and swamj) 
lands and the development and regulation of water power and the forma- 
tion of drainage and conservation districts. ' ' Already at the time of the 
convention ]\Ir. Leete has developed a broad and systematic plan by 
which the various streams of Ohio, capable of developing water power, 
might serve as the basis for unit districts which should be organized 
under the auspices of the state and by resources properly developed 
under state supervision. By the organization of such conservation dis- 
tricts and the scientific utilization of their resources, Mr. Leete has long 
been convinced that adequate power might be developed to supply not 
only the ordinary needs of manufacturing and municipal lighting, but 
the electric current should be introduced into every farm home and 
every village of the state. Mr. Leete has been a working member of the 
Ohio Valley Improvement Association since its inception, and througli 
that and other organizations has used his professional influence and his 
pen to call attention to the undeveloped resources of Lawrence County. 
Frederick Guilford I^eete was born at Ironton, July 14, 1860, and 
represents not only a prominent early family of Southern Ohio but one 
of distinction in the early annals of New England. His father, Ralph 
Le(4o, was a prominent attorney in Ironton, and was born in Pennsyl- 
vania. The mother was Harriet E. Hand, a native of England. The 
Leete family originated in England and an adequate sketch of the lineage 
can be found in "Evans Pioneer Record of Southern Ohio." As early 
as 1209 the Leetes were found in Cambridgeshire. Frederick G. Leete 
is in the ninth generation from Sir John Leete of Dodington, who was a 
justice of the court of common pleas. His son, William Leete, born in 
1612 in England, located at New Haven, Connecticut, July 10, 1689. 
He held numerous ofifices in that colony, was deputy governor of New 
Haven from 1658 to 1664 and from 1669 to 1676 was deputy governor 
of Connecticut after New Haven and Connecticut had been united. From 
1676 until his death in 1683 he was governor of Connecticut. This 
colonial official was noted for his integrity and wisdom, was the first 
Puritan in his family, and some of his best qualities have been trans- 
mitted to his descendant in Southern Ohio. A son of this first American 



880 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

ancestor was Andrew Leete, also colonial governor of Connecticut, begin- 
ning in 1667 and continuing until his death in 1702. He is given credit 
for secreting the charter of the colony when it was sought to be de- 
stroyed, and also prevented the arrest of the regicides Gotfe and Whalley, 
who were fugitives in the colony. 

Fredeinck Leete was graduated from the fronton High School iu 
1878, and from 1879 to 1884 taught the grammar department at 
Waverly. In the meantime he had taken up the study of civil engineei'- 
ing, and from 1884 to 1886 studied law with his father at Ironton but 
was never admitted to the bar. His occupation as a land surveyor began 
in 1884, and for the past thirty years that department of his profes- 
sion has received a large amount of attention. Politically Mr. Leete is 
ranked as a democrat, but practically is independent in politics, and has 
manifested a strong advocacy of the temperance cause. He is not a 
member of any church. 

Mr. Leete married Jennie IMcNichols Holland of Ironton. Her father, 
Patrick McNichols, was a former contractor and business man of that 
city. In the judgment of his fellow citizens Mr. Leete has long held a 
position among the leaders in his home county. He has a cool, calm 
judgment of men, affairs and institutions, and in many ways has main- 
tained the high ideals set before him by his illustrious ancestors. He 
stands for right and justice whenever and wherever duty calls, and to a 
degree beyond most men has realized his highest ambition to be a useful 
and honorable citizen. 

Capt. Adam J. Bucii. While the people of Portsmouth now recog- 
nize Captain Buch a successful business man and president of the 
Vulcan Last Company, a brief review of his life shows that for a num- 
ber of years he was thoroughly acquainted with the hardships of 
existence, having become self supporting when only thirteen years of 
age. His introduction to Portsmouth in the year 1877 was in the role 
of a worker in the mechanical trades, and close attention to business 
and a growing capacity for larger responsibilities have brought him to 
his present substantial position. 

Capt. Adam J. Buch was born in Wheeling, West Virginia. 'His 
father was Adam J. Buch, Sr., a native of Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, 
where his parents spent all their lives. Of the family Adam's brother 
Leopold and a half-l)rother named Joseph, came to America and settled 
in Wheeling. Adam J. Buch, Sr.. was reared and educated in his native 
province, and came to America when a young man. He had established 
a home and was in a fair way to prosperity, but not long after the 
breaking out of the Civil war he was shot in his own house by a drunken 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 881 

vagabond, who afterwards was legally convicted and banged. The 
father was at that time thirty-five years of age. He had married 
Elizabeth Balzer, also a native of Hesse Darmstadt. She survived her 
husband only five years, and left a family of six children, namely : 
Adam J., Mary% Christina, Catherine, Leopold and Annie. After the 
death of the mother the four girls were placed in a Catholic home, and 
the younger brother was taken care of by an aunt. Captain Bucii 
began to shift for himself and at the age of thirteen was spending his 
days in any honorable labor that he could find. After about fifteen 
months of various kinds of work he apprenticed himself to learn the 
sheet iron and copper trade. For the first year his wages were $1 a 
week and board, for the second year $1.50 a week, and for the third 
year $2 a week. He managed to keep himself in a modest way, and 
mastered the trade, and at the end of his apprenticeship was retained 
as a regular employe in the plant and spent seven years as a mechanic. 
At that time there occurred an industrial depression, and work was 
very scarce in his line, and he was out of employment. Any work he 
could get was then acceptable, and after a time in May, 1877, he left 
Wheeling hoping to better his fortune. His intention was to go as 
far south as his available means would carry him. However, a friend 
persuaded him to land at Cincinnati and try to find work there. An 
acquainta,nceship formed with Capt. E. B. Moore, commander of the 
steamer Bonanza, was the influence which finally directed him to Ports- 
mouth. Captain ]\Ioore had financial interests in the Portsmouth 
foundry and machine shops, and induced ]Mr. Buch to come to that city 
where he was given employment in the shops and eventually acquired 
stock in the company and continued one of its aggressive factors for 
eighteen years. At the end of that time he became associated with 
L. D. York, of the Burgess Steel Works when they organized the Ports- 
mouth Structural Steel & Iron Company, which he managed. When 
the Burgess steel works burned out Captain Buch was employed iti the 
building of the boilers, stacks and other portions of the plant of the 
steel works at New Boston, and he remained with l\Ir. York until the 
plant was sold to the Crucible Steel & Iron Company, and then con- 
tinued with that for a year. Then followed several months of well 
earned rest, and with L. D. and Raymond York and Floyd Knowles 
Captain Buch crossed the Atlantic and enjoyed an extended trip abroad, 
returning to the home of his ancestors in Hesse Darmstadt. Following 
his return to Portsmouth, in the fall of 1901, Captain Buch contracted 
with the city to erect the flood defense pumping station, and when that 
contract had been fulfilled he became associated with the Peebles Paving 
Brick Company, of which he was made vice president and general 



882 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

manager, erected its plant, and continued with the Peebles Paving Brick 
Company until 1913. He was also one of the organizers of the Buckeye 
Fire Brick Company. In the meantime the Vulcan Last Company had 
l)een organized, and he became its president, and now devotes practically 
all his business attention to this important Portsmouth industry. The 
Vulcan Company is engaged in the making and remodeling of lasts, and 
supplies a large amount of equipment for the shoemaking trade. While 
much of his time has lieen taken up with the executive direction of large 
concerns, Mr. Buch is also a thorough mechanic and originator and his 
invention of the box-toe drying rack was a valuable device which was 
sold to the United States Machinery Company. 

In 1889 Captain Buch married Louise Snyder. She was born in 
Portsmouth and her parents were Bavarian people. Mr. and Mrs. Buch 
liave three children: Adam F. who died at the age of seven years; 
and Clara and Mamie. Clara is the wife of Charles Miller, and has 
two children, Martha and Charlotte. Mamie married William J. Burke 
and has a son William II. Captain Buch and wife are members of 
St. IMary's Catholic Churcli, and he is a member of Council No. 1 of the 
Knights of St. George, which he served as captain for twelve years, and 
is also afifiliated with Portsmouth Council No. 741 of the Knights of 
Columbus. 

Irving Drew, i)resident of the Irving Drew Company, of Ports- 
mouth, Scioto County, has Ijeen a dominant power in advancing tlie 
manufacturing and mercantile interests of this section of Ohio, he and 
liis father, the late Frederick Drew, having been among the original 
shoe manufacturers of Portsmouth, and prominent in the upbuilding of 
one of the largest industries of the kind in the city. A native of New 
England, he was born, July 27, 1849, in Rowley, Essex Count}^ Massa- 
chusetts. His paternal grandfather, Joshua Drew, was born, in 1793. 
in Durham, New Hampshire, being a son of Samuel Drew, a native of 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The Drew family, according to tradition, 
originated in England, the immigrant ancestor coming from there to 
America in colonial times, and locating in New Jersey, from whence 
some of his descendants migrated to New Hampshire. 

Frederick Drew was born, February 1, 1817, in Durham, Now 
Hampshire, where his father was a life long resident. Leaving home at 
tlie age of eighteen years, he located in Essex County, Massachusetts, 
a county in wliicli. without doubt, more shoes are manufactured 
annually than in any otlier county in the world, and for upwards of 
fifteen years resided in the Town of Rowley where he became thoroughly 
identified witli the trade of a shoe manufacturer, learning the business 



HANGLNG ROCK IRON REGION 883 

from start to finish. In 1851 he came to Portsmouth, Ohio, to accept 
the position of foreman in the old time shoe factory which Robert H. 
Bell had established the previous year, it being the pioneer factory of 
the city. Going back to ]Massacliusetts at the end of a few months, he 
remained in Rowley until 1854, when he returned to Ohio, and for eight 
years was engaged in the manufacture of shoes by the old hand method 
and selling at retail at fronton, Lawrence County. Going to Granville, 
Licking County, in 1862. he there continued in the shoe business a part 
of the time until 1869, when he returned to Portsmouth to again enter 
the employ of ^Mr. Bell, who had commenced to manufacture shoes by 
machinery, and from that time until 1891 he was actively associated 
with the shoe business of that place. Returning then to ]Massachusetts, 
he spent the remainder of his life in Rowley, his death occurring there 
on October 17, 1896. 

The maiden name of the wife of Frederick Drew was Sarah G. 
Bailey. She was born in RoAvley, jMassachusetts, a direct descendant in 
the seventh generation from the immigrant ancestor. James C. Bailey, 
wlio settled in ^lassachusetts about 1630. the line of descent being thus 
traced: James C. (1), John (2), Nathaniel (3), Deacon David (4), 
Ezekiel (5), Ezekiel (6), and Sarah G. (7). Ezekiel P. (6) Bailey, 
a life long resident of Rowdey, was a ship carpenter by trade, and for 
numy years was intimately connected with an industry of much import- 
ance. Mrs. Sarah G. (Bailey) Drew died January 30, 1900. To her 
and her husband six children were Iwrn, two dying in infancy and four 
were reared, as follows: Ellen A.; F. Austin, who died in 1874, at 
the age of twenty-seven years ; Irving, the subject of this sketch ; and 
]\[a.ry S., who died in 1901. 

Irving Drew was educated in the schools of Ironton and Granville. 
Coming to Portsmouth, Ohio, in 1869. he began work in a shoe factory 
as a general utility man, and in short time had learned to use the McKay 
Sewing Machine, and to last shoes. In 1871 the firm of Rifenberick, 
Drew & Gregg was formed, and succeeded to the ownership of the 
R. Bell & Company manufacturing department. In 1874 the Ports- 
mouth Shoe ..Company was organized, with Mr. Drew as secretary, 
treasurer, and general manager, the company succeeding to the owner- 
shif» of the Rifenberick. Drew & Gregg Company's plant. In 1877 
y\r. Drew and his father withdrew from that concern, and organized the 
firm of Irving Drew & Company. In 1880 George D. Selby purchased 
fin interest in that organization, and the firm name became Drew, Selby 
ik (/ompany, Bernard Damon being the .iunior member of the firm. In 
1902 the business was incorporated as the Drew-Selby Company, and 

-Mr. Drew sold enoxigh of his stock to iMr. Selbv to give him a controlling 
Vol. n-iG 



884 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

interest in the business, although he himself remained as a director 
until 1905. Mr. Drew then disposed of his entire interest in the linn, 
which then became the Selby Shoe Company. In 1902 Mr. Drew 
organized the Irving Drew Company, of which he has since been tlie 
president. This enterprising company succeeded to the business of 
The Star Shoe Company in 1902, and about a year later purchased the 
business of the Heer Shoe Company, merged the two and enlarged its 
operations, The Irving Drew Company liaving grown from a small 
beginning until now its business is nearly as large as was that of tlic 
Drew-Selby Company when INlr. Drew disposed of his interest in lliat 
concern. 

Mr. Drew, married, June 30, 1879, Ella A. Gates, who was born in 
Cheshire, Ohio, a daughter of William Wallace and Alvira (Nye) Gates, 
natives of Ohio. Seven children have blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. 
Drew, and in order of birth are: LeRoy Irving, who died at the age of 
twenty-four years in 1904; Mabel Arelie, married S. D. Ruggles and 
they have an adopted daughter, Elinor; Marjorie Gates, wife of T. C. 
Lloyd, has three children, Roy Irving, Reese and Drew; Rowena Nye 
married A. F. Marting, and has two children, Richard Drew and Sarali 
Ann; Hazel Bailey; Frederick Wallace and Everett A. Mr. and iMis. 
Drew are members of the Second Presbyterian Church, in which he is a 
ruling elder. 

James J. Cranston. One of Portsmouth's forceful business men was 
the late James J. Cranston, who after many years spent in conducting 
his extensive interests as a farmer and dairyman passed away at his home 
in Portsmouth, December 9, 1915. His death was the more unfortunate 
as it came in the prime of his vigorous career, and marked the passing 
of a representative of the fine old stock of Southern Ohio, his family 
having been identified with Scioto County for fully a century. 

He was born June 18, 1862, at Wheelersburg in Scioto County, and 
was in his fifty-fourth year when he died. Wheelersburg was also tlu' 
l)irthplaee of his father Jeremiah Cranston. 

His grandfather, Judge Edward Cranston, was born in Rhode Island 
February 2, 1790, of substantial New England ancestry. In early man- 
hood, many years before railroads traversed the countiy west of the 
Alleghanies, he .iourneyed on horseback from his liome to Ohio. Locating 
at Portsmouth, he first found employment in a blacksmith's shop. In 
1820 in partnership witli David Gharky, he bought a carding mill, and 
operated it for eight years. In 1828 he moved to AVlieelersburg, con- 
tinued the operation of a carding mill there for a time, and then con- 
verted the plant into a woolen mill, to the ownership of which his sons 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 885 

subsequently sucei'i'ckHl. Judge Cranston exercised good judgment in 
making his investments, bought large tracts of land adjoining tlie 
village, and superintended the improvement of his property. When he 
located at Wheelersburg the greater part of all that section of the 
country was heavily timbered, filled with wild game of all kinds, in- 
cluding the deer, Avild turkeys and other animals and birds that so 
largely furnished su])sistence for the hardy pioneers. The huge giants 
of the forest that would now be so valuable were felled, rolled together 
and burned. Judge Cranston lived to see the country well settled and 
contributed his full share towards advancing its material interests, lie 
was also prominent in a public way, serving as county commissioner 
from 1831 until 1838, during which time the Little Scioto bridge was 
built, as were also the courthouse and the jail. From 1846 until 1851 
he was an associate judge of the county. In politics he was a whig and 
influential in party ranks, llis death was a public loss, and ^Ir. Evans 
in his history sa^'s of him: "He was one of the most forceful char- 
acters who ever occupied the stage of public affairs in Scioto County."' 
Judge Cranston married Nancy Cole, and they reared a large family of 
children. 

Jeremiah Cranston spent his entire life in the vieijiity of his birlh- 
l)laee at Wheelersbiirg. Beginning when young to assist his father in 
the mill, he became familiar with its every department, and for many 
years majiaged it successfully. He died at the age of sixty-seven, hon- 
ored and respected by all who knew him. He married Abigail Deautre- 
mont, who was of pure French ancestry. Her father was born in France, 
came to the United States when young, and for a time lived in the 
western part of New York. Starting to the west from Olean, New 
York, he went down the Allegheny River to Pittsbiirgh, and from there 
made the journey down the Ohio on a raft made of lumber. That was 
the customary manner in which lumber from the forests of New York 
and Western Peinisylvania was laken to market. He locnte(l nt Wheel- 
ersburg in Scioto County and a few years later went to Iowa where he 
was one of the pioneers at Rivei'side. ]\li's. Abigail Cranston survived 
her husband about six years, and left six children named Fi'ank E.. 
Mary A., Benjamin, Lewis, James J. and Chai-les. 

Reared at- Wheelersburg. the la1e James J. Cranslon attendt-d the 
public schools, and having as a youth became familiar with the work (if 
Ihe carding mill while assisting his fatliei- was jjlaced in charge of tln> 
])Iant at the age of nineteen and superintended its management fourteen 
years. During that time j\Ir. Cranston was engaged in the mercantile 
business at AVheeler.sburg and contiinu'd in the same after leaving the 
mill for five years, conducting a Avell-stocked general store. On leaving 



886 IIAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

liis work as a merchant he turned his attention to agriculture, giving 
his time and attention to his dairy farm a mile from Wheelersburg. For 
live years he sold milk to the wholesale trade, and then bought an 
interest in t'he milk business conducted by Fuhs & Miller. The following 
year he acquired all the interests and continued the business alone, first 
located on Court street in Portsmouth, and two years later on John 
street. In 1913 he moved to his last location on North Eighth street. 
Avhere he erected a commodious brick structure with cement and tile 
floor and furnished with every possi])le e(|uipment for the sanitary and 
efficient handling of milk products. lie also built a plant for the manu- 
facturing of ice, a much needed article in his business. This was not only 
a flourishing enterprise from a business standpoint but also one of vital 
benefit to the ent.re city of Portsmouth. Mr. Cranston purchased milk 
from carefully selected dairies in Scioto and other Ohio counties and also 
from Kentucky dairy farms, and upwards of six hundred well fed and 
well tended cows furnished the supply which was distributed daily 
from his plant over the city of Portsmouth, seven wagons being employed 
to cover the route of distribution. 

The late Mr. Cranston was a member of the Ohio State Dairy Asso- 
ciation, and one of the ablest men in the dairying profession in Southern 
Oliio. Through his business he rendered a splendid public service, and 
was a man whose name and career deserve grateful memory. lie was 
married November 26, 1884, to Miss Addie M. Merrill, who was born in 
Ironton, Ohio, a daughter of John Pearl and Julia A. (Moore) Merrill. 
Both the Merrill and Moore families were among the early pioneers of 
Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. Cranston were born three children: Lewis 
Pearl, Jessie L. and Eflie E. 

Fraternally Mr. Cranston was affiliated with Wheelersburg Lodge of 
]\lasons and with Wheelersburg Lodge of Knights of Pythias. He and 
his family attended the Methodist Episcopal Church. 

Rev. John W^iijjam Dilu^x. A man of firm convictions, strong 
cliciracter and deep consecration. Rev. John William Dillon, of Ports- 
mouth, is well-known throughout Central and Southern Ohio as an 
earnest worker in the IMethodist Episcopal denomination, in which he was 
licensed as a preacher nearly threescore years ago, and in which he has 
since faithfully and successfully labored. A son of Samuel Dillon, he 
was born October 18. 1834. in Mason Township, Lawrence County, Ohio, 
of Irish ancestry. 

His paternal gj-andfathei-, Micajah Dillon, was born in County Gal- 
way, Ireland, and as a child was brought to America by his parents, 
Samuel and Mary Dillon, who located in Vii-ginia, which they subse- 



HANGLNG ROCK IRON REGION 887 

quently made their permanent Jiome. Growing to manhood in Franklin 
County, Virginia, Micajah Dillon remained there until 1831, when, 
accompanied by his family, he made an overland journey to Ohio, locat- 
ing in Lawrence County. Buying a tract of land that was still in its 
primitive wildness, he cleared a farm, and there lived and labored 
until his death, at the age of seventy-five yeai-s. His wife, whose 
maiden name was Mary Saxton, survived him a few years. They reared 
eight children, five of them being sons. 

Samuel Dillon was born in Franklin County, Virginia, April 21), 
1811, and at the age of twenty years came with his parents to Ohio. 
Marrying a few months later, he and his bride set up housekeeping in 
a log cabin, and at once began the pioneer task of reclaiming a farm 
from the forest. Bears, deer, wolves, and wild turkey were then plentiful, 
and often destructive to the growing crops. In 1849 he sold the farm 
in Mason Township, and purchased land near Millersport, on the Ohio 
River, and there resided until his death at the venerable age of eighty- 
five years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary White, was born 
in August, 1811, at Fincastle, Botetoiirt County, Virginia. Her father, 
-John White, a native of the same county, came with his family to 
Lawrence County, Ohio, in 1828, and having taken up a tract of timber 
in Mason Township hewed a farm from the wilderness, and was there 
engaged in tilling the soil the remainder of his life, dying at the age 
of eighty-one years. John White's wife, whose maiden name was Nancy 
MacFarland, was born in Fincastle, Virginia, and died in Mason Town- 
ship, Ohio, soon after her arrival in the state. Mrs. Mary (White) Dil- 
lon learned to card, spin and weave in girlhood, and after her marriage 
carded, spun and wove the cloth from which she fashioned the clothes 
for her family. She lived to be nearly eighty years of age. 

One of a family of seven children, John William Dillon liogan his 
school life at the age of four years, the school being held in an abandoned 
log cabin, and supported liy the subscription plan. Free schools, how- 
ever, were established soon aftei- that time. As soon as old enough to 
use axe and hoe, he had to assist on the farm, and a('(|nin'(l a good 
knowledge of agriculture as then carried on. At llie age ol' seventeen 
years he was converted, and on July 16. 1856, was licensed as a local 
preacher. He afterwards became assistant pastoi- to Rev. Andrew Car- 
roll, presiding elder of the Portsmouth district, which included Pci'iy 
Chapel, Coal Grove, Union Chapel, Blount Tabor, Windsor Chapel. Scott 
Town, Locust Grove of Marion, with headquarters at Bui-lington. In 
1857 Mr. Dillon joined the Ohio Conference at Chillicothe, and con- 
tiinied active in the ministry for a full half century, having pastnrntes 
in Portsmouth. Gallipolis, Zancsville, Newark, Tronton. CoIuuiImis. DcUv- 



888 HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 

\\are, London and Lancaster, and at other places. In addition Mr. 
Dillon was for eight years presiding elder in the Portsmouth district, 
and for two years presiding elder in the Gallipolis district. Since 1898 
Mr. Dillon has made his home in Portsmouth. 

On Jaiiuary 10, 1860, Mr. Dillon was united in marriage with Mary 
Catlierine Cox, who was born on a farm at Sandy Springs, Adams 
County, Ohio, November 25, 1835, a daughter of Martin Cox. Her 
paternal grandfather, John Cox, a native of New Jersey, came with his 
family to Ohio in pioneer days, locating in Adams County, and having 
bought land near Sandy Springs was there employed in general farming 
the remainder of his life, paying but little attention to his trade of a 
millwright. Martin Cox was bom August 10, 1811, and was but five 
years old when, in 1816, he was brought by his parents to Ohio. He was 
a natural mechanic, and having learned the trade of a carpenter was 
for several yeax's engaged in the building of flat boats on the Ohio 
River. Subsequently buying land on the Ohio river bottoms near Sandy 
Springs, he became a tiller of the soil, and was engaged in agricultural 
pursuits until his death at the age of seventy-eight years. The wife of 
]\Iartin Cox, whose maiden name was Mary Catherine Murphy, was born 
near Sandy Springs in 1819, a daughter of Recompense and Catherine 
(Newkirk) Murphy, w^ho in 1800, came from New Jersey to Ohio, and 
liaving bought wild land on the Ohio river bottoms engaged in farming. 
After settling near Sandy Springs, Mr. Murphy went back to his New 
Jersey home twice to si^ttle his aflfaii'S, making the round trips on foot, 
and carrying his money in a satchel. Mr. IMurphy lived to a good old 
age. and ]\Irs. Murphy was ninety-three years old when she died. 

Mr. and Mi"s. Dillon have reared five children, namely : Mary Cath- 
erine. Sarah Jane, John Grant, Edmund B., and Benjamin H. Mary 
C. is the widow of Morgan Mollohan. Sarah is the wife of Gilbert D. 
AVait. of whom a brief account is given elsewhere in this work. John 
Grant entered the Wait furniture factory as bookkeeper when young, 
and when it was incorporated w'as made secretary and treasurer, a posi- 
tion that he retained until his death, March 25, 1914. He married 
Essie Tynes, who, with their two children, Donald and Helen Louise, 
survive him. Edmund B., a lawyer by profession, is now judge of the 
Couj't of Common Pleas, at Columbus. 



TTakry S. Grimks. Tn the death of Harry S. Grimes March 7, 1915, 
Portsmouth lost one of its oldest and most succes-sful business men and 
citizens. His enterprise, ability and integrity had reflected credit upon 
one of the native citizens of Scioto County. His interests were varied, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 889 

Avere associated with the development and growth of much that Ports- 
mouth cherishes in its financial, business and social life. 

His father, tlie late James Grimes, was born in Birmingham, Eng- 
land, which was the home of his ancestors as far back as is known, and 
he was the only member of the family to come to America. He learned 
tlu' art of japanning metal in his native land, and on coming to the 
Tnited States first followed his trade in Pittsburg-, Pennsylvania. Com- 
ijig from there to Ohio in 1836, he established a foundry in Portsmouth, 
and was engaged in the manufacture of stoves, also conducting the 
business of japanning, and continued a resident of the city until his 
death at the age of sixty-eight years. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Mary A. Tobin, was born in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, a daughter 
of William and Mary Tobin, and died in Portsmouth aged eighty-one 
years. She reared a family of ten children. 

Acquiring a good education in the public schools of Portsmouth, 
Harry S. Grimes entered the employ of Miller & Regan as a clerk, and 
was afterwards similarly employed in the wholesale grocery of A. W. 
Buskirk, where he obtained a practical insight into business affairs. In 
1873 he became an independent commission dealer in grain, flour and 
meals, and that was his chief work as a business man for a period of 
forty-two years until his death. One by one his earlier contemporaries 
passed away, and he witnessed an almost entire change in the personnel 
of the business and professional life of the city. Progressive and ener- 
getic, he was always among the foremost in the establishment of bene- 
ficial projects, and was prominent and influential in aiding the develop- 
meTit and growth of this section of Scioto County. 

His position as a business man is indicated by the fact that before 
his death he was serving as president of the Ohio Grain Dealers' Asso- 
ciation, and was also at one time president of the Grain Dealers' National 
Association. He was a member, former president and one of the execu- 
tive committee of the Ohio Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He served 
as president of tlie Portsmouth Commercial Club when that organiza- 
tion was an important factor in the upbuilding of the city, and had 
served as president of the Portsmouth Savings & Loan Association from 
its incorporation until his death, a period of about twenty-three years. 
Mr. Grimes was also the founder of the Washington Hotel. For eleven 
years he was a member of the State Board of Agriculture, serving one 
year as president of the board and one year as treasurer. In his home 
city he also gave some efficient service as a member of the city council, 
and for many years was a trustee of the Portsmouth Cemetery. He is 
affiliated with Portsmouth Lodge of the Benevolent and Protective Order 



890 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

of Elks, in which he was past exalted ruler, and was a member and 
vestryman of All Saints' Episcopal Church. 

On December 9, 1873, Mr. Grimes married Mary Vaughters, who 
was born on a farm in Nile Township, Scioto County, a daughter of 
John A. and Mary D. Vaughters. Mrs. Grimes survives her honored 
husband, and is the mother of three children : Shirley V. ; Leah Pauline, 
wife of Harry E. Taylor, editor of the Portsmouth Times; and John A., 
who married Frances Coleman, and their three children are named 
Harry Coleman, Nancy Noyes and Mary Pauline. 

Henry A. Schermann, M. D. A skillful and experienced physician 
and surgeon of Portsmouth, Henry A. Schermann, M. D., is a fine rep- 
resentative of the native born citizens of Scioto County, his birth having 
occurred in Portsmouth, January 27, 1879. 

His father, the late George Jacob Schermann, was born, November 
20, 1834, at Neiderhochstadt, Bavaria, Germany, a son of George Theo- 
bold and Margaret (Meller) Schermann. He attended school quite 
regularly throughout his boyhood and youth. In 1854 he emigrated 
to the United States, embarking at Havre de Grace, and after a sea 
voyage of forty-two days landing at New Orleans. Immediately join- 
ing relatives then living in St. Louis, Missouri, he soon apprenticed him- 
self to a carriage maker to learn the trade, and while thus employed 
attended a night school, where he made a special study of languages, 
drawing and bookkeeping. In January, 1860, he went to Oklona, Mis- 
sissippi, where he remained until the following August. There was much 
talk of war, especially after Lincoln's candidacy was announced, and 
he started north, going first to Cincinnati, Ohio, from there coming to 
Portsmouth the very last of that month. The ensuing four years he 
was in the employ of Metzger & Krecher, carriage makers, and then, in 
1864, formed a partnership with William Angle, John Held and Fred 
Deutschie, under the firm name of Schermann & Company, and until 
1878 was engaged in business as carriage builders and blacksmiths. In 
1880 he embarked in the livery business, which he continued until his 
death. The maiden name of his wife was Augusta Kauffman, to whom 
he was married April 13, 1862. Of their union eight children were 
born, as follows: Kate, Emma, Lena, Charles, Alfred. Hattie, George, 
Henry A. 

After his graduation from the Portsmouth High School with the 
class of 1897, Henry A. Schermann clerked for a time in a drug store. 
Turning his attention then to the study of medicine, for which he liad 
a natural taste and inclination, he entered the Medical Department of 
the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor, and was there graduated witli 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 891 

the degree of M. D. in 1902. Going then to Europe, Doctor Scheruiann 
continued his studies in Glasgow, Edinburg, London, Berlin, Vienna, 
i\lilan and Paris, imbibing knowledge and wisdom from some of the 
most noted and experienced physicians and surgeons of Europe. Return- 
ing home after a profitably spent year abroad. Doctor Schermann began 
the practice of his chosen profession at Portsmouth, where he has since 
remained, having built up an extensive and lucrative patronage. 

Doctor Schermann married, in 1906, Edith Emeline Swinton, who 
was born in Ontario, Canada, a daughter of David and Agnes (Ilarri- 
cot) Swinton, who were of Scotch descent. The Doctor and ]\Irs. Scher- 
mann have three children, namely: Edith Gretchen, Mary Augusta, 
and Marion Elizabeth. The Doctor is a member of the Hempstead 
Academy of Medicine; of the Ohio State Medical Society; and of tlie 
American IMedical Association. He is also surgeon for the Portsmouth 
Steel Company. In 1823 Dr. Giles S. B. Hempstead commenced a daily 
weather report, which he accurately kept until his death in 1858, when 
it was continued by Dr. D. Blatten until 1903, since which time Doctor 
Schermann has continued the record. This is one of the two oldest con- 
tinuous weather reports in existence in the United States, and the Doc- 
tor is daily called upon for information regarding the weather during 
the period covered by the record. The Doctor was reared in the Ger- 
man Evangelical Church, and was confirmed in 1893, while Mrs. Scher- 
mann was brought up in the Presbyterian faith, and is a member of 
the Second Presbyterian Church. 

William Alexander Givens. This is a name that was borne across 
the Alleghanies before the close of the Revolution, transplanted on the 
"dark and bloody ground" of Kentucky, and more than a century ago 
was established in Southern Ohio, where William A. Givens now repre- 
sents it in the third generation. The family has been distinguished for 
productive endeavor and useful citizenship wherever found, and IMr. 
Givens has been prosperous in the management of land and is now a gen- 
eral merchant and highly esteemed citizen of Nile Township, Scioto 
County. 

William Alexander Givens was born on the old Givens homestead 
February 10, 1854. His great-grandfather came out of the East, joined 
a few pioneers in Mason County, and there met death at the hands of 
the murderous Indians. He had married ^lary Mitchell, whose father 
David Mitchell was born in the province of Pennsylvania in 1733, and 
was a soldier in the Revolution, being a private in Captain Erwin 's com- 
pany of Second Battalion, Cumberland County, Pennsylvania militia, 
and also a private in James Morrison's company. Col. Thomas Porter's 



892 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

battalion. After her husband had been killed by the Indians Mary 
(jivcns married John ]\IeBride. 

Judge William Givens, grandfather of William A., was born in 
Mason County, Kentucky, September 18, 1782, only a few weeks after 
his father had lost his life as above mentioned. He became one of the 
pioneer settlers of Scioto County, and from here removed to what is 
]'ow Jackson Coimty, and located on the present site of the City of 
Jackson. February 7, 1814, an act was passed by the Ohio Legislature 
appropriating money for the purpose of promoting the discovery of 
.salt and the encouragement of its manufacture at the Scioto salt works, 
]o<-ated on the present site of Jackson City. Judge Givens and others 
sank the first wells and manufactured the first salt on a commercial scale 
at that location. The Givens salt well is said to be still open. In other 
ways his enterprise was a feature of early Jackson County history. He 
circtf'd a commodious two-story log mansion, and when the county was 
or<ianized the courts iield tlieir first sessions in this house, which was 
also the first place of meeting for the countj'^ commissioners. The Legis- 
lature made him one of the three associate judges of Jackson County. 
Somewhat later, in 1826, he returned to Scioto County, and bought 301 
acres of river bottom land, all of it then heavily timbered. Besides his 
service as associate judge in Jackson County he served as judge of the 
court of common pleas for that county and also for Scioto, and in 1818 
was elected a meml)er of the State Legislature. 

Judge AVilliam Givens was twice married. His second wife and the 
iiiotlier of all his children was Rachel Stoekham. Her name has asso- 
ciations with early times in Scioto County. William Stoekham, her 
father, was a native of Wales, came to the United States in 1777, settling 
neai- Trejiton, New Jersey, and there married Susanna Paine. In 1798 
they moved out to the Northwest Territory, and made a home in Madison 
'J'ownship of Scioto County, where he died in 1815 and she survived 
until 1835. Rachel Stoekham by her marriage to Judge Givens became 
the mother of eleven children, namely : William ; David, who married 
Cynthia McCall; John, who married Elizabeth Collier; Samuel, George, 
Allen F., James Harvey, Cynthia, who married John ]\IeDermott; Jane, 
Mary, and Thomas J. Judge William Givens died June 26, 1863, and 
his wife on February 18. 1865. He was first a whig and later a repub- 
lican, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Though books 
and liljraries were very limited in his day, he. had an exceptional private 
collection of the best standard literature and works of reference and was 
a thorough student. 

William Givens, Jr., son of Judge Givens and father of William A., 
was born July 31, 1811. at Poplar Row, as the present site of the City 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 893 

of Jackson was tlioii known. While attending country school he also 
had some employment in the salt works of his father in Jackson County, 
and was fifteen years old when the family settled in the wilderness of 
Nile Township of Seioto County. He and his brothers, David and John, 
found some strenuous work in clearing off the timber from the bottom 
land acquired l)y their father. They operated a "wood landing" on 
the river bank and supplied great quantities of fuel to the passing steam- 
boats, applying the money for the purchase of land. The woods were 
filled Avith all kinds of game, large and small, and it required only a 
healthful outdoor exertion to provide all the living necessities. The 
era of railroads had not yet dawned in this part of the country, and 
beside the river route the only transportation was by canal and stage. 
William Givens. .]]-., was a man of great industry. After reaching his 
majority he ejigaged in farming on the old homestead, and also con- 
structed a number of keel and flat-boats, which were in demand for riA'^er 
freighting, and often were sent south to New Orleans. His home re- 
mained in Nile Townsliip until liis death July 30, 1898, at the age of 
eighty-seven. 

He niari'ied Klizalietli Elliot, a daughter of Benjamin and Isabella 
(McCaimi Elliot, lioth the Elliot and ^leCann families were Scotch, 
and among the pioneers in Scioto and Adams counties. Elizabeth Elliot 
was born in Scioto County February 12. 1814. and died October 11, 1899. 
She reared eiglit cliildreji : Cynthia G., who married Washington Cross; 
Sarah Ellen, who was married to R. A. Bryan; ]\Iary Jane, who married 
]M. Herdjnan; ^lartha S. became the wife of Rev. S. M. Donahue; Eliza 
C. married George Williamson: ^largaret Isabel, David Ci"aighten, and 
William A. Politically the late William Givens was first a whig and 
]at( r followed the fortunes of the republican party from its organiza- 
tion until his death. He and his wife were among the strongest sup- 
porters of the Methodist Church in their community, and their home 
was headquarters for all circuit riders and all others who came from a 
distance to attend the meetings of the ehurcTi. 

William Alexander Givens, who thus had a sturdy and high-minded 
ancestry as the background of his career, grew up on the homestead in 
Nile Township, and acquired his education in what was well known as 
the Elm Tree Sehoolhouse. He was trained to farming by his father, 
and for many years that was his exclusive occupation. His first inde- 
pendent venture was to rent the homestead for three years. Removing 
to Sandy Springs, in Adams County, for a time he rented the farm of 
his father-in-law until he purchased it. After seventeen years spent 
there he sold and bought the interests of the other heirs in the Givens 
homestead, and thus has the land acquired by his grandfather early in 



894 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

the last century. Farming was the foundation of his abundant pros- 
perity. In 1905 Mr. Givens bought the mercantile business from Sam- 
uel Thatcher, located on the Portsmouth and Bueiia Vista pike, about 
two miles from Buena Vista, and since then has been active a.s a mer- 
chant, and in 1911 was appointed postmaster and still holds that office. 
In the meantime he has also acquired the Squire ^IcCall farm, one of 
the oldest places in the county. 

October 24, 1877, Mr. Givens married Lucy H. ]\Iurphy. She was 
born in Adams County, a daughter of Recompense Sherry and Rachel 
(Kelly) Murphy, and a granddaughter of Recompense and Catherine 
(Newkirk) Murphy. Her father was a prosperous farmer, owned a 
large farm at Sandy Springs, and lived there until his death at the 
advanced age of eighty-five. The remains of himself and wife now rest 
in the Sandy Springs Cemetery of Adams County. ]\lr. and ^Nlrs. Givens 
have reared five children : Lillie, Walter, Rachel, Lynn and Rhoda. 
Lillie married Clyde Dixon in 1915 and now lives in the old McCall 
property at ]\lcGraw P. O. Walter married Lydia Bridwell, and has 
two children, IMargaret and Eugene. Rachel is the wife of Thomas 
Smith, and has a daughter Helen. Lynn married Mattie Aker, and their 
children are Robert, Dillon and Dorothy. Rhoda is the wife of Howard 
Davidson. ]\Ir. Givens and wife are both members of the Methodist 
Episcopal Church. 

Samuel Bierly. The late Samuel Bierly, who died at his home in 
Portsmouth, Scioto County, on the 19th of April, 1905, was a man whose 
sincerity, kindliness and intrinsic nobility of diaracter gained to him 
the high regard of those with whom he came in contact in the various 
relations of life and his active career was marked by worthy achievement 
along normal and beneficent lines of enterprise. 

Though a native of Buckhannan, West Virginia, where he was born 
in the year 1846, jMr. Bierly passed the major part of his life in Scioto 
County. He was a son of Joseph and Sara (Tolley) Bierly, both natives 
of Pennsylvania and representatives of stauncli old families of the his- 
toric German element that has been most prominent and influential in 
the annals of that great commonwealth of the American Union. From 
l^ennsylvania the parents of Mr. Bierly finally came to Ohio and they 
passed the closing years of their lives on their homestead farm in Scioto 
County, having been residents of this county for many years prior to 
their death. Samuel Bierly, the suliject of this memoir, acquired his 
early education in the public schools and as a young man he learned the 
carpenter's trade, at which he became an expert artisan. He followed 
his trade for several vears and after his marriage finallv established 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 895 

his resideiiee on a farm that had been purchased by him, this property 
being in Clay Township, Scioto County. He proved a progressive and 
successful agriculturist and after devoting a number of j^ears to farm- 
ing iic removed to the city of Portsmouth, where he thereafter lived 
virtually retired until his death. 

,Mr. Bierly was a man of high ideals and broad mental ken, was loyal 
and public-spirited as a citizen and though he never manifested aught 
of ambition for jiolitical ofifice he gave unwavering allegiance to the cause 
of the republican party. He was a consistent and earnest member of 
the Methodist Episcopal Church, as is also his widow, who still resides 
in l*orts)noutli, and in the time-honored IMasonic fraternity he was affili- 
ated with the following named organizations in Portsmouth : Aurora 
Lodge, No. 48, Free and Accepted -Masons ; Mount Vernon Chapter, No. 
28, Koyal Arcli Masons, and Calvary Commandery, No. 13, Knights 
Templars. 

On the IDth of September, 1877, was .solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Bierly to ]\liss Lora E. Salladay, who was born and reared in Clay 
Township, Scioto County, and wlio is a daughter of John M. and Martha 
(Ilayward) Salladay, members of old and influential pioneer families 
of this county. Concerning the interesting history of the Salladay fam- 
ily and incidentally that also of the Hayward family, adequate data are 
given on other pages of this publication, in the sketch of Mrs. Bierly 's 
brother, George M. Salladay, of Portsmouth, .so that further review is 
not demanded in the present connection. Mrs. Bierly was a resident of 
Scioto County from the time of her birth, here received excellent educa- 
tional advantages and here was a most popular representative of a family 
that was founded in the county in the year 1800, when Ohio was made 
an independent territory, with boundaries nearly the same as that of 
the present state. ]\lrs. Samuel Bierly was prominent and popular in 
the repi'esentative social activities of her home city, zealous in church, 
cliaritable and benevolent work was known as a most gracious chatelaine 
of her hospitable home. She died March 13, 1913. Mr. and Mrs. Bierly 
arc survived hy two cliildren, Sarah iM. and Stewart S. Sarah M. is 
now tlie wife of George Gaines, who is engaged in the grocery business 
at Portsmouth, and they have one son, Stewart. Stewart S. Bierly is 
a resident of Portsmouth, Ohio, where he is engaged in farming. He 
married ."Miss Emma Putzek, and tliey have two children, Lora Augusta 
and Dorothy .Alay. 

LkKov V. S.MiTji. Besides a relationship with several of the pioneer 
families of Soulliei'n Oliio. LeRoy F. Smith has made his own career a 
source of lienetit 1o bis community, and through nearly half a century 



896 HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 

has been pursuing the steady industry of agriculture and owns one of 
the very attractive farmsteads of Washington Township in Scioto County. 
Mr. Smith is also a member of the board of trustees of his home townshij), 
and when his friends and neighbors have asked his co-o^peration in any 
movement vi'hich meant better living and more advantages to the coiu- 
munity, his assistance has never been withheld. 

LeRoy F. Smith was born in what is now Rush Township of Scioto 
County, August 23, 1846, a son of Peter J. Smith, who was born near the 
Virginia line in the State of Maryland. Grandfather William Smith was 
one of the early settlers of Washington Town.sliip, Scioto County, and 
from the date of his coming some member of the family has been con- 
nected with the worthy and progressive activities of this section. Wil- 
liam Smith was buried in the cemetery at Dry Run. lie married a Miss 
Hoskinson, whose father was a native of ■Maryland and one of Uie 
pioneers of Adams County, Ohio. 

Peter J. Smith was only a child when liis parents came to Ohio and 
located in Washington Township. That was about eighty years ago, 
and few of the present generation can appreciate; all the changes whicli 
have come over the country since then. Scioto County was in the midst 
of the heavy woods, abounding in wild game, and the era of both canals 
and railroads was still in the future. As a young inaji he did sonu' work 
during the construction of the canal through his home locality. His 
career, which was comparatively l)rief, since he died in the prime of life 
in 1853, was mainly identified with farming. He bought land extending 
along both sides of the Galena Pike, and including a considerable .stretch 
of the fertile acres lying in the l)ottonis of the Scioto River. When lio 
took possession the improvemciits consisted of a substantial two-sto)'y 
hewed log house, with about 100 acres cleared and ready for cultivation. 

Peter J. Smith married Rebecca ^loore, of a family that was among 
the first in Ohio when it was a part of North^vest Territory. She was 
born in Nile Township of Scioto County. l\ov fathei'. Firman iVlooi'c, 
was l)orn at the historic Town of Boonesboro, Kentucky, in 1790. His 
father was the Rev. Jo.seph Mooi-e, a native of New Jersey, whence he 
emigrated to Kenlucky when it was an almost uninliabited wilderness. 
He was with a party tliat ci'ossed tlie i-idge of the AUeghanies, and on 
reaching the Ohio Rivei- endiarked on flatboats. In the course of the 
voyage they were attacked hy Indians and some of them killed, bnl 
Reverejid Moore escaped and made Ids wa>- to Boonesboro, where i\)f 
some lime he lived in tlie fort. After the treaty of jx-ace with t\\v In- 
dians, he crossed the Ohio into Northwest Teri'itory, and found a home 
in what is now Adams County, being one of tlie first white nien to rear 
the structure of civilization in tliat locality. A local preacher, he or- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 897 

ganized a Methodist society iu Adams County, and built a log church, 
which in the annals of Methodism is supposed to have been the first 
church of this denomination in Ohio. It was built very substantially, 
and stood for many years, being known as Moore's Chapel. While he 
was zealous and active in church work, he made his living like most of 
the pioneers by wringing a subsistence from the soil. He bought land 
six miles west of Manchester, and made his home there while he preached 
iu several localities. Wlien this useful life came to a close, his remains 
were laid to rest on his farm. 

Firman Moore, who was brought to Ohio in infancy, grew up on llu; 
farm just mentioned, and though trained to agricultural pursuits spent 
many years of his manhood in another line of business. With his brother 
Joseph he opened a stone quarry at Buena Vista. The stone was loaded 
on flatboats, constructed from the native timber, was floated down the 
currents of the various rivers, and finally sold in southern cities, tlie 
timbers of the boats being sold at the same time. The transaction com- 
pleted, and with the proceeds in his pocket, he would return as best he 
could, sometimes b}'^ an upriver boat, but very often walking all the 
way across a region infested with Indians and outlaws. After conditions 
had changed to make the stone business less profitable, he bought a farm 
on the Buena Vista Pike, and made hLs home there until the close of 
the Civil war. Having sold his land he removed to ]\Iercer County, 
Illinois, where he died in his ninety-third year. Both he and his brother 
Joseph had seen active service in the War of 1812. Firman ]\Ioore mar- 
ried Anna Worley, who died several years prior to her husband. Mrs. 
Peter J. Smith, who died in 1896, was a member of the Methodist Church. 
her husband being of like faith. They reared four children, named 
William Firman, LeRoy F., John D. and Joseph C. 

LeRoy F. Smith recollects Scioto Count.y during the years befor*^ 
the war, at which time he was living witli his widowed mother on the 
farm, and besides giving his assistance where he was able to keeping up 
the homestead was also attending the local schools. He was only six 
years old when his father died, and has known the value and necessity 
of honest toil from an early age. His own caiver began as farmer on 
rented land, but after three years, by thrift and econouij', he was able 
to purchase a farni of his own, and has since lived in Washington Town- 
ship on the Galena Pike. Part of his farm is in the Scioto River bot- 
toms, while the land about the house and barns extends well up the I'idge 
of hills overlooking the river, affording an attractive and healthful loca- 
tion for a home. He has erected a set of substantial farm buildings, and 
has eft'ecled many other improvements that add to the value of the farm. 

In 1869 ]\Ir. Smith married IMiss Ilattie Bradford. She was born in 



898 HAXGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Washington Township, a daughter of Cornelius Bradford. The latter 
was a native of Wilmington, Delaware, but in young manhood came to 
Ohio, locating in AVashington Township, where he impi-oved a farm on 
Ilygcan Run and lived there many years. Late in life he went to Cali- 
fornia, and spent his last days in Oakland. Cornelius Bradford mar- 
ried p]iiiiiy Dollarheid, who died in early life, and her daughter, Mrs. 
Smitli, wa.s reared by the stepmother. Mrs. Smith died January 19, 
1912. Her four children are Joseph 0., Howard, Mary and Walter. 
Tile church in which ^Mr. and Mrs. Smith have worshipped many years 
is the Old Town Methodist Episcopal, in which he has long served as 
a trustee and as superintendent of the Sunday school. 

Ray Dever. In the farming district of the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region are many prosperous and progressive men who believe that the 
ha])piest life as well as the most independent one is to be lived on the 
farm. Prominent among these is Ray Dever, of Clay Township, in 
Scioto County. Mr. Dever is proprietor of the Hillside Fruit Farm, 
comprising 100 acres of land, all well improved, five miles northeast of 
Port.smoutli. Mr. Dever has spent all his life in this community, is known 
as an excellent farmer and a man who can be depended upon in matters 
of local welfare. 

Ray Dever was born in IMadison Township of Scioto County, Febru- 
ary 12, 1881, a sou of Kendall and IMatilda (Moagey) Dever. Both 
])arents were natives of Madison Township, and represent old families 
in this county. The father was born in 1857 and died in October, 1912, 
and the mother was born in 1867 and died October 23, 1912. There 
were only two children, and the daughter, Stella M., is a graduate of 
tlie Harrisonville public schools and is now the wife of Dr. W. A. Ray 
of Portsmouth, Ohio. 

Ray Dever was reared on a farm in j\Iadison Township, and while 
gaining his education in the public schools up to the time he was eighteen 
years of age, also was trained in the industry which he has since fol- 
lowed as his life vocation. ]\Ir. Dever was married March 1, 1903, to 
Ida McDaniel, who was born and reared on a farm in Madison Town- 
sliip, and likewise obtained her education from the public schools. They 
ai-e the parents of three children : Ho G., born February 7, 1904 j Garnet, 
l)orn August 23, 1906; and Edison, born September 23, 1907. In poli- 
tics Mr. Dever is a republican. 

Chaki.ks II. Ci.EMMONS. Conducting a pro.sperous general merchan- 
dise business at Davis, in Clay Town.ship, Scioto County, where he holds 
also th<' position of postmaster of the office designated as George, Mr. 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 899 

Clemmons is a representative of a family whose name has long been 
identified with the civic and industrial interests of this 'bounty, his 
father being still numbered among the representative citizens of Valley 
Township, where he is the owner of a well improved farm, his wife 
l)eing deceased. 

Charles H. Clemmons, a son of John W. Clemmons, was born in Val- 
ley Township, Scioto County, on the 12th of January, 1877, his father 
being a native of Pike County, this State. Of the seven children, Charles 
H. is the eldest of the four now living; Grover C. is engaged in the 
general merchandise business at IMeehaniesburg, Champaign County; 
Pearl is the wife of Glenn Mayo, of Mechanicsburg ; and Emma remains 
at the paternal home. 

The public schools afforded to Charles H. Clemmons his early educa- 
tional advantages and he was graduated in the Scioto Township High 
School, in Pike County, as a member of the class of 1897, after which 
he attended the normal school at Piketon, that county, and prepared 
himself for effective service as a teacher. After devoting two years to 
teaching in the schools of Pike County he engaged in the general mer- 
chandise business on Miller's Run, where he remained two years, since 
which time he has conducted a well e(iuipped general store at Davis, or 
Davis Station, this place having been his place of residence since Feb- 
ruary, 1901. In politics Mr. Clemmons is a stalwart prohibitionist and 
he has held the position of postmaster at George since 1901. Both he and 
his wife are members of the Valley Chapel Methodist Episcopal Church, 
and at Lucasville he is affiliated with Lucasville Lodge, No. 465, Free & 
Accepted Masons, and with the Council No. 263, Improved Order of Red 
Men, of which he is past sachem and which he has represented in the 
grand council of Ohio. 

In 1898 Mr. Clemmons wedded Miss Hattie Burns, who was reared 
and educated in Scioto County, and they have four children — Claude, 
Ethel, Ruth and Eileen. 

John Hodge. As a native son and representative agriculturist of 
Scioto County, Mr. Hodge is entitled to recognition in this publication. 
He is the owner of a fine farm in Nile Township, and special interest 
attaches to this fact by reason of its being the old homestead on which 
he was born and on which his honored father likewise had stood exponent 
of industry and successful achievement in connection with the devel- 
opment and progress of agricultural interests of this favored section of 
the old Buckeye State. 

On the farm which is now his home John Hodge was born on the 17th 
of February, 1869, and he is a son of Stephen and Sarah (Cooper) 

Vol. 11—17 



900 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Hodge, the former of whom was born in West Virginia and the latter in 
the Brush Creek section of Adams County, Ohio. Stephen Hodge was 
a son of AVilliam and Phoebe (Cooper) Hodge, who came in an early day 
to Scioto County, where they resided for a time at Portsmouth, after 
which j\Ir. Hodge purchased a tract of land on Pine Run, where he re- 
claimed a farm and passed the remainder of his life, his wife having pre- 
ceded him to eternal rest. Stephen Hodge was a young man at the time 
of the family removal to Scioto County, and here he eventually bought 
a farm on Upper Twin Creek, in Nile Township, his original purchase 
having been a portion of the well improved homestead now owned by his 
son John, of this review. He put forth much energj' and ability in the 
reclamation and develoi^ment of his farm, w'as a loyal and valued citi- 
zen of Nile Township and commanded unqualified popular esteem in the 
comnuxnity. He contiiiued to reside on his homestead farm until his 
death, which occurred when he was seventy-five years of age. His wife 
was born in the year 1831 and still resides in Scioto County, one of the 
venerable pioneer Avomen of the township that has long represented her 
home and in which her circle of friends is limited only by that of her 
acquaintances. She celebrated her eighty-fourth birthday anniversary 
in 1915 and retains in a remarkable degree her mental and physical pow- 
ers. Thomas Cooper, father of ^Irs. Sarah Hodge, was one of the earliest 
settlers of Nile Township. Scioto County, where he i:)urchased a tract of 
heavily timbered land, on Twin Creek, this section having been at the 
time little more than an untramineled wilderness and land having been 
placed at an average valuation of $1.25 an acre. After clearing a portion 
of his land Thomas Cooper sold the property and removed to Adams 
County, where he developed a farm and passed the residue of his life. 
He was a son of Samuel and Nancy (Groom) Cooper, who were num- 
bered among the sterling pioneers of Scioto County, where they con- 
tinued to reside on their pioneer farm, on Brush Creek, until the close 
of their lives, ]\Irs. Nancy (Groom) Cooper having been l)orn in Adams 
County, this state and having been a daughter of John Groom, one of 
the first settlers of that county. 

Mrs. Sarah (Cooper) Hodge recalls in pleasing reminiscence many 
scenes and incidents touching the pioneer days in this part of Ohio. As 
a girl she learned to card and spin wool, as the housewife of the day 
thus made provision for the making of the clothing for the family, and 
she remembers well when the yawning fireplace served in lieu of a stove, 
both for warming and cooking purposes. This venerable woman became 
the mother of nine children, of whom three are now living. 

John Hodge early began to lend his aid in the work of the home farm 
and his were the educational advantages afforded by the rural schools of 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 901 

the day. He has never severed his allegiance to the great fundamental 
industry of agriculture and he now owns the farm that Avas the original 
place of settlement of his paternal grandfather and which later became 
the property of his father. Mr. Hodge has made excellent improvements 
on the old homestead and is one of the progressive and substantial farm- 
ers of his native county. Though never a seeker of piiblic office he is 
loyal and liberal as a citizen and is aligned as a staunch supporter of 
the cause of the republican party. 

In the year 1910 Mr. Hodge wedded Miss Ollie Cooper, who likewise 
was born and reared in Nile Township, and who is a daughter of Robert 
and Sarah Cooper. ^Ir. and Mrs. Hodge have three children, Eliza, Ray 
and John. 

James R. Hemphill. Not long can well directed energy and good 
judgment applied to the great industry of agriculture fail to show results 
that may be noted by even the casual observer, and this is distinctly 
in evidence in connection with the career of ^Ir. Hemphill as one of the 
am])itious and representative farmers of Scioto County, where he main- 
tains his residence on one of the many fine farms of Nile Township. 

]\Ir. Hemphill was born in Adams County, Ohio, on the 10th of June, 
1875, and is the only son of Thomas H. and Isabella (Elliott) Hemp- 
hill. Thomas Holmes Hemphill was born in the City of Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, on the 29th of January, 1831, and died February 10, 1915. 
He was a son of ^Matthew H. Hemphill, who was born in the north of 
Ireland, of Scotch ancestry, and who immigrated to America when a 
young man. ^Matthew H. Hemphill established his residence in Phila- 
delphia, where he remained until 1839, when he and his family set forth 
for Ohio, the long overland journey having been made with a team of 
horses and a large covered wagon, in which vehicle were transported 
also the household effects. After arriving in Scioto County they passed 
six months at Portsmouth, and they then continued their pioneer jour- 
ney into Adams County. There Matthew H. Hemphill purchased a tract 
of timber land in the locality known as "Tranquility." On his land 
was a log house and a log barn, of the type common to the pioneer 
days, and a small clearing had been made on the embryonic farm. He 
reclaimed much of his land to cultivation and on this homestead he and 
his wife passed the remainder of their lives. 

Thomas II. Hemphill was reared to manhood on the pioneer farm- 
stead just mentioned and his entire active career has been one of close 
and successful identification with agricultural pursuits. He remained a 
resident of Adams County until 1880, when he removed to Scioto County 
and became one of the successful farmers of the Twin Creek District of 



902 HAXGING KOCK IRON REGION 

Nile Township, where he and his wife still reside, his son James R., of 
this review, being associated with him in the work and management of 
the farm. Thomas H. Hemi^hill first married ^liss Paulina A. Collins, 
and upon her death she was survived by three children, Etta ^Margaret, 
Mary S. and David Steele, the last mentioned of whom is now deceased. 
For his second wife Mr. Hemphill wedded I\Iiss Isabella Elliott, who was 
born on a farm near Wilmington, Clinton County, Ohio, in 1841, and 
died September 14, 1915. She was a daughter of John Elliott, who was 
born in Pennsylvania and whose father, William Elliott, likewise was 
a native of the Keystone State, and a representative of a pioneer Scotch- 
Irish family of that historic old commonwealth. William Elliott was 
numbered among the early settlers in Clinton County, Ohio, where he 
reclaimed and improved a farm on Lee's Creek and where he passed the 
remainder of his life. John Elliott continued his residence in Clinton 
County until 1854, after which he passed two years in Adams County, 
and in 1856 he numbered himself among the substantial agriculturists 
of Nile Township, Scioto County, where his death occurred in 1881. He 
married Miss Nancy Elliott, who was born and reared in Scioto County, 
a daughter of Benjamin and Isabella (McCann) Elliott, and she was 
sixty-five years of age at the time of her demise. 

James R. Hemphill is the only child of his father's second marriage 
and the only surviving son, his half-brother, David S., having died at 
the age of nineteen years. Mr. Hemphill was about five years old at 
the time of the family removal to Scioto County, and here he was reared 
to adult age on the farm which is still his home, his early education hav- 
ing been acquired in the well known Elm Tree School, in Nile Township. 
He continued to reside with his parents until their death and to be 
actively identified with agricultural pursuits, with a well established 
reputation as one of the progressive and representative farmers of the 
younger generation in Scioto County. On the home farm special atten- 
tion is given to the raising of corn and tobacco. He is a republican in 
politics and both he and his wife are members of the ^Methodist Episcopal 
Church, his parents holding membership in the Reformed Presbyterian 
Church, the adherents of which are frequently designated as Cove- 
nanters. 

On the 22d of December, 1898, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Hemphill to Miss Emma F. Jeffers, who was born in Lewis County, Ken- 
tucky. Her father, Henry Jefi'ers, was born at Steubenville, Ohio, a son 
of Henry F. Jeffers, who later removed to Lewis County, Kentucky, 
where he passed the remainder of his life. Henry Jeffers, father of 
Mrs. Hemphill, was ten years of age at the time of the family removal to 
Kentucky, and he passed the rest of his life in Lewis County, that state, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 903 

his death having occurred in the Village of Carrs, when he was sixty-six 
years of age. He wedded Miss Ann Stratton, who was born and reared 
in Kentucky, as was also her father, Thompson Stratton, the latter hav- 
ing been a son of Aaron Stratton, who was a pioneer of the old Bluegrass 
State, where he was a contemporary and associate of Daniel Boone, the 
historic frontiersman. After the death of her husband Mrs. Ann (Strat- 
ton) Jeflfers came to Ohio, where her death occurred about two years 
later. Mr. and Mvs. Hemphill have four children : Holmes, Julia Belle, 
Keith Jeffers, and Mary Margaret. 

Mrs. Nora Jones Briggs. The Jones, Williamson and Briggs fam- 
ilies, all represented by Mrs. Briggs of Washington Township in Scioto 
County, have many interesting and useful relations with this section of 
Ohio, covering a century or more in time. Love of land, peace and in- 
dustry have been marked characteristics in the various generations, and 
as the earlier members sufit'ered and toiled to establish homes in the wild- 
erness, so those of later and easier times have continued to uphold and 
increase the virtues with which the names have always been associated. 

Herself born in Wa.shington Township, Mrs. Briggs is a daughter of 
Luther R. Jones, who was born in Stafford County, Virginia, in 1840. 
His father, George Jones, was a native of Virginia, came to Ohio in an 
early day and bought a farm three miles from Wilmington, which was 
his home till death. He married Lucinda Fallis, who died in middle 
life, and her parents were early settlers in the vicinity of Wilmington 
and spent their last days there. 

Wlien only a youth, Luther R. Jones left the old home and came to 
Scioto County to make his home with his sister, ]\Irs. ^linerva I. Bailey, 
of Washington Township. Soon after the breaking out of the Civil war, 
he enlisted in Company E of the Thirty-third Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and was with the regiment in its various movements and engagements 
until the Battle of Perryville, Kentucky, in 1862, where he was severely 
wounded in the left leg. He*lay on the battlefield some time unattended, 
and then summoning all his resolution he arose, took two muskets, and 
set out for the front. Again he was hit, this time in the right leg, which 
completely disabled him. He lay on the field among the wounded, dying 
and dead for two days, and was then taken to shelter and received 
surgical attention. Some friends came and took him home. From one 
leg fifty-two pieces of bone were taken, and he was unable to walk for 
eighteen months. That was the end of his military service, and his 
wounds brought him a discharge with all honors. However, he lived to 
the age of sixty-five, and met death by accident in Russelville, in 1905. 

Luther R. Jones married Louisa J. W^illiamson, of one of the first 



904 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

families in Scioto County. She was born on a farm at Dry Run in 
Washington Township. Thomas Williamson, her father, was also born 
in Scioto County. His father, Joseph Williamson, was probably born 
in New Jersey, and coming west became one of the first settlers in 
Scioto County, where he secured a tract of Government land near the 
mouth of the Scioto River in Washington Township. He died in 1812. 
The maiden name of his wife was jMartha Feust. Thomas Williamson 
spent hi-s active years as a farmer, and owned a farm extending along 
both sides of the Galena Pike. His own efforts resulted in the clearing 
up of a large amount of land, and his later years were spent in com- 
fort. When the Old Town IMethodist Church was organized in 1837, he 
was one of its trustees. Thomas Williamson married Lucinda Ord,'who 
was the grandmother of ]\Ir.s. Briggs. She died at the age of thirty-six. 
For his second wife he married Druzilla Smith, who survived him a few 
years. 

Mrs. Briggs was the only child who grew up. Her mother died in 
1891. In Washington Township, where are all the associations of her 
childhood and youth, and where she was educated, she married Febru- 
ary 26, 1890, Aaron A. Briggs. 

i\Ir. Briggs was born in Clay Township, Scioto County, November 
29, 1863. His father, John K. Briggs, was born October 6, 1826, on 
the old Briggs homestead on the Chillicothe Pike, a farm now included 
in the City of Portsmouth. The grandfather, Samuel Clingman Briggs, 
was born in Nescopeck Township, Luzerne County, Penn.sylvania, May 
25, 1794, a son of John and Hannah (Clingman) Briggs. Hannah Cling- 
man was a daughter of John Michael Clingman, a soldier of the Revolu- 
tion and one of the first settlers in Portsmouth. Samuel C. Briggs came 
to Portsmoiith in 1815, making his home for a time with his uncle, 
Aaron Kinney. When All Saints Church was organized June 23, 1817, 
he was one of the signers of its constitution, and was confirmed as a mem- 
ber of that church in 1820. Later his membership was transferred to 
the Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church, in which for a number of years 
he was steward and trustee. His home until his death was the old 
Briggs farm. The second wife of this old pioneer was Rebecca Tim- 
brook, the grandmother of Aaron A. Briggs. She died in 1840 and 
her husband in 1860. John Kinney Briggs moved out to Washington 
Township in 1861, and was successfully engaged in farming until his 
death on November 27, 1893. He had three wives. The mother of 
Aaron Briggs was Mary ]Miller, who died November 14, 1865. Her chil- 
dren were Louisa, who died in childhood ; Laura, who died at the age 
of sixteen ; Aaron A. ; Margaret, widow of Dr. George W. Osborn ; 
Charles C. ; and Frank. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 905 

Aaron Briggs had the suljstantial training of a farmer boy, with an 
education in the rural schools, and it was to the vocation of farming that 
he paid his life's tribute of productive labor. In 1890 he located on the 
farm now occupied by Mrs. Briggs, the old Williamson homestead, and 
lived there until his death in 1906. The first wife of Mr. Briggs was 
Sabrina Cole, daughter of George W. Cole. At her death on November 
24, 1888, she left two sons, Alfred M. and Frank A. 

Mrs. Briggs has three daughters, Margaret, Beulah and Helen. With 
her children she occupies the fine old Williamson estate, which is to a 
degree her own ancestral domain. Its lands border the Galena Pike on 
both sides, and the house is located on high grounds, overlooking the 
Scioto Valley with a view of the hills beyond. 

Francis A. Swearingen. One of the many beautiful rural homes of 
Scioto County is that owned by Mr. Swearingen, this idyllic place being 
situated on a side-hill overlooking the Ohio Valley and its picturesque 
surrounding hills, and the farm comprising 218 acres of most fertile and 
productive land, in Nile Township. The house on the place is a fine old 
mansion that is now equipped with modern facilities and accessories, and 
is on an excellent turnpike road extending from Portsmouth to Buena 
Vista. The property was purchased by JMr. Swearingen in 1908 and here 
he and his wife are living in peace and comfort, independent and pros- 
perous, esteemed by all who know them and with virtually influences 
and environment that would do justice to the old patriarchal regime, as 
all of their children save one live within ready telephone communication 
and thus the venerable parents are favored in having about them their 
children and their children's children, their devoted companionship 
having covered a period of nearly half a century and both being repre- 
sentatives of honored pioneer families of this section of the old Buckeye 
State. 

Though he claims the fine Bluegrass State as the place of his nativity, 
Mr. Swearingen has been a resident of Southern Ohio from his early 
childhood and for many years he has stood as one of the substantial and 
prominent representatives of the basic industries of agriculture and 
stockgrowing in this section of the state, besides which his is the distinc- 
tion of having been one of the gallant young Ohio patriots who ren- 
dered valiant service as soldiers in the Civil war. He is well known 
in Adams and Scioto counties and after years of earnest and fruitful 
endeavor, he and his wife find themselves compassed by most benignant 
and grateful influences and environment in the gracious twilight of 
their lives. 

Francis Asbury Swearingen was born on a farm in Lewis County, 



906 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Kentucky, on the 4th of January, 1846, and as this is one of the Ken- 
tucky counties lying directly across the Ohio River, his present home is 
not far removed from the place of his nativity. He is a son of John and 
Mary (Lov eland) Swearingen, the former of whom was born in Lewis 
County, Kentucky, on the 1st of December, 1821, and the latter of whom 
was born in Scioto County, Ohio, where her father, Horace Loveland, 
was a pioneer settler. John Swearingen was a son of Marmaduke and 
Mary (Stratton) Swearingen, his father having been a native of Penn- 
sylvania and having immigrated thence to Kentucky iii an early day, to 
become a pioneer of Lewis County, where he reclaimed a farm to effec- 
tive cultivation and where both he and his wife passed the remainder 
of their lives. 

John Swearingen was reared to adult age in his native county, where 
he was afforded the advantages of the pioneer schools. At the age of 
eighteen years he crossed over the Ohio River to Scioto County, Ohio, 
and here, in 1841, was solemnized his marriage to Miss i\Iary Loveland. 
Soon afterward he returned to Lewis County, Kentucky, and there he 
and his wife continued to reside until 1850, when they established their 
liorne on a farm in Adams County, Ohio. Six years later they removed 
to Scioto County, and Mr. Swearingen purchased a farm in Nile Town- 
ship,— the fine bottom lands of the Ohio River Valley. Here he devel- 
oped one of the productive and valuable farms of this specially opulent 
section of Southern Ohio, and on the old homestead both he and his 
wife continued to reside until their death, each having attained to the 
venerable age of eighty-seven years. Both were earnest and zealous 
members of the ^Methodist Episcopal Church and their Christian faith 
was exemplified in their daily lives. Kindliness, consideration and help- 
fulness marked their course, and their names and memories are held in 
lasting honor in the county that long represented their home. ]\Ir. 
Swearingen was a man of strong mentality and well fortified convic- 
tions, was influential in public affairs of local order, and served several 
years as trustee of Nile Township. As a devout and consistent church- 
man he filled for a number of years official positions in the Methodist 
Church in which he and his wife held membership, in Nile Township. 
He was treasurer of the church and also served as classleader. These 
lionored pioneers reared a family of five children, namely : Francis A., 
Alpha, Laura A., John W. and Anna. 

Francis A. Swearingen was a child of four years at the time of his 
parents' removal from Lewis County, Kentucky, to Adams County, Ohio, 
and about ten years old when the family home was established in Scioto 
County. His early educational discipline was obtained in the common 
schools of the locality and period and he continued to be actively asso- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 907 

ciated in the work and management of the homestead farm until he 
responded to the call of higher duty and tendered his aid in defense of 
the Union. 

On the 26th of August, 1862, when but sixteen years of age, Mr. 
Swearingen enlisted as a private in Company H, Eighty-first Ohio Vol- 
unteer Infantry, and as a youthful patriot and faithful and efficient 
soldier he made an admirable record in connection with his service in 
the ranks of one of Ohio's gallant regiments. With his command he 
participated in many of the important engagements marking the progress 
of the great conflict between the North and the South, and in campaigns 
and battles he lived up to the full tension of the great struggle. He was 
with his regiment in Sherman's )nemorable Atlanta campaign and the 
subsequent march to the sea, and in this connection took part in the 
historic battles of Kenesaw ^Mountain, Resaea, and Dalton, the siege 
and capture of Atlanta, and in the ever memorable march of Sherman 's 
forces to the seaboard and thence up through the Carolinas to Wash- 
ington, where INIr. Swearingen had the distinction of participating in 
the grand review of the jaded but victorious Union forces at the close of 
the war. He received his honorable discharge, at Louisville, Kentucky, 
on the 19th of July, 1865, and then returned to his home. Mr. Swear- 
ingen served during virtually the entire war and the more gracious 
memories and associations of his military career are vitalized through 
liis active affiliation with the Grand Army of the Republic. 

During the long intervening years Mr Swearingen has been continu- 
ously and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits in Scioto 
Countj^, and he has been one of the progressive and vigorous represen- 
tatives of this line of industrial enterprise in this section of the state. 
His present attractive and valuable homestead was purchased by him 
in 1908, as previously noted in this context. He has been one of the 
world's productive workers, his eour.se has been guided and governed 
by the highest principles of integrity and honor, and he and his wife 
having impregnable place in the contidence and good will of all who 
knew them. They are zealous members of the Asbury Methodist Epis- 
copal Church at Pond Run and in polities, though never a seeker of 
public office, Mr. Swearingen is a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
republican party. 

On the 31st of October, 1866, was solemnized the marriage of ^Mr. 
Swearingen, the sturdy "young veteran" of the recent Civil war, to 
]\Iiss Sarah J. Grimm, and witli abiding love and sympathy they have 
since remained in devoted companionship, the while they have reared 
their children to lives of rectitude and usefulness and have not been 
denied their full reward in filial affection and solicitude. ]\Irs. Swear- 



908 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

ingen was born in Wirt County, West Virginia, and is a daughter of 
Michael and Susan (Edwards) Grimm, the former of whom was born 
in Jackson County, that state, and the latter in Monroe County, she hav- 
ing been a daughter; of Lewis and ]Mary Edwards. Peter Grimm, father 
of ^liehael, was a prosperous farmer of Jackson Count}^ West Virginia, 
and it is supposed that lie there passed his entii'e life. Michael Grimm 
Ajas reared and educated in his native county and continued to be iden- 
tified with agricultural pursuits in West Virginia until 1865, when he 
came with his family to fScioto County, Ohio, and purchased a farm on 
Pond Run, Nile Township, where both he and his wife passed the resi- 
due of their lives, he having attained to the age of seventy years and 
his widow having been seventy-six years of age at the time of her death. 
Their seven children were : Mary, Nancy, John, Sarah J., Allen, Charles 
and Homer. Mr. and ]\Irs. Swearingen likewise have reared seven chil- 
dren, and in the concluding paragra^ih of this review are given brief 
data concerning them. 

Ulysses Grant married INIiss Anna Evans and they have four chil- 
dren — Mildred, Robert, Loa and Ray. Emma is the wife of William R. 
Punteney and they have four children — Frank S., ^Minnie, George II., 
and Ruth. Mary is the wife of Andrew B. Turner and they have three 
children^Aniy, I\Iabel, and Albert, ^lichael wedded ^liss Sarah Odell. 
John T. married Miss Alice Odell and they have three children — Law- 
rence, Lois, and Walter. Ira married ^liss l^essie Ilall and they have 
three children — Willier, Ray, and Isabella. Kate is the wife of Albert 
Aril and they lirive four children — Rny. Eugene, Helen, and Margaret. 

Jonx S. Raim'. Out on Galena Pike in Washington Township can 
lie found some .striking evidences of the enterprise of John S. Rapp in 
a fine farm homestead and several platted and improved additions to 
the Village of Nauvoo. ^li-. Rapp represents a substantial element of 
German stock that has lieen identified with the Ohio Valley for over a 
century, and his own methodical and careful management has placed 
him in a position lieyond want and to command the entire respect of 
a comnuinity. 

John S. Rapp was l)orn in Ueaver Township of Pike County, Ohio, 
June 26. 185-1^, a son of Christian Rapp and grand.'^ou of Frederick 
Jiapp, both of whom were born in AVuertemberg in Southern Germany. 
A kinsman of the grandfather was George Rapp, the leader of a 
religious society that opposed the Roman Catholic Church, who was 
finally compelled by persecution to come to the United States in 1802 
to seek a location for himself and followers in the land of freedom. 
Having fixed on a location eighteen miles below Pittsburg, he returned 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 909 

to his native land and in 1803 led across the Atlantic some six hundred 
of his followers, many of whose descendants still live in the vicinity 
first occupied by this religious colony. Grandfather Frederick Rapp 
himself came to the United States in 1827, spending about three months 
on a slow-going sail vessel. Landing at New York he went overland to 
Pittsburg, where his family and possessions were embarked on a river 
boat, and came down the Ohio and first located in ]\Iuskingum County. 
While living there he made several trips to Portsmouth, passing through 
Pike County, and finally coneluded to estal)li.sh a home in the latter 
county-. A tract of Government land was bought in what is now Beaver 
Townsliip, and the first home was a double log house. That was his 
home till his death when about seventy years old, and in the meantime 
his work had brought about the improvement and cultivation of many 
acres. Energy was his marked characteristic, and with the increase 
of possessions he finally had about five hundred acres. The seven 
children he reared were Frederick, Christian, IMichael, Louis, Jacob, 
John and Catherine. 

Christian RapiJ, the father, was about eight years old when the 
family crossed the ocean to America. He had the advantages of 
training afforded by residence in a new country, somewhat limited 
as to book learning but every incentive to practical labor. After 
reaching manhood he left the home place and bought 100 acres in 
Beaver Township, paying .^900. It had some frame buildings and a 
considerable acreage cleared, and was located an eighth of a mile from 
the Village of Beaver. A few years later, having sold this farm at an 
advance, he moved to Scioto Township in Jackson County and bought 
and occupied the farm on which he died when seventy-eight years 
of age. The wife of Christian Rapp was ^lary Spangler, a native of 
Germany. Her father, John Si)angler, came to America a1)0ut 1830, 
and spent tlie rest of liis years in Beaver Township. His daughter, 
.Mrs. Rapp, lived to tlie age of seventy-five, and reai'cd ten children, 
jmmed Peter, .lolm S., Jjouis. Henry, Chri.stian, Charles, Joseph, 
Catherine, Lena and Anna. 

John S. Rap]) spent his youthful days in Pike and Jackson coun- 
ties, and while attending school worked for his father until twenty- 
one. He had little with which to make a start for himself, and conse- 
quently was a renter for a number of years. His home was on the 
Sargent farm near Piketon nine years, and on coming to Scioto County 
in 1886 he rented a place on Dry Run. Prosperity smiled on his 
efforts, and in 1900 he purchased the Calvert farm on the Galena Pike 
in Washington Township. The same year he had surveyed and platted 
sixty lots which are recorded as liapp's addition to Nauvoo. In 1906 



910 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

he put on a second addition, containing fifty-four lots, followed by a 
third addition of thirty-two lots in 1911, and since then a fourth, also 
with thirty-two lots, in 1915 he added a fifth addition of 120 lots, and 
in this year he has added to his farm holdings a forty-acre tract, which 
is to be cut in one-acre lots. The property is very happily located 
on the side hill overlooking the Scioto and Ohio valleys, and Mr. 
Rapp has proved very successful as a real estate operator. For a 
period of twenty-four years the direction taken by his farm enter- 
prise was dairying, but in recent years he followed the lines of general 
agriculture. 

In 1877 Mr. Rapp married Elizabeth Ober. She was born in Beaver 
Township of Pike County. Both her father, John, and her grand- 
father, Frank Ober, were natives of Germany, and came to the United 
States about 1830 and locating in Beaver Township, where the grand- 
father improved a farm. John Ober, seven years old when brought 
to America, was reared and trained as a farmer, and having inherited 
a portion of the estate finally bought the interests of the other heirs 
and had a large and valuable farm on which he lived till death and 
reared his family. ]Mrs. Rapp's mother was Hannah Elizabeth Renner, 
born in Germany. Frederick Renner, her father, was well educated 
and taught school in his native land, and on coming to America located 
in Jackson County, wliich remained his home until his death at the 
age of sixty-one, his widow surviving to the advanced time of eighty- 
one years. A grandson named Fred Renner now occupies the old 
homestead. ]\lrs. Rapp's mother after being reared and educated in 
Germany came to America at the age of twenty-one, preceding her 
parents, and coming down tlie Ohio landed at Portsmouth, then a 
small town, and proceeded on to Piketon. She died at the age of 
sixty-one, while John Ober passed away when seventy-two. Mrs. Rapp 
was one of a family of six daughters and one son, namely: Mary, 
Elizabeth, Caroline, Catherine, Christina, John and Lena. 

Mr. Rapp is the father of a family of six sturdy and industrious 
sons — John E., Jo.seph W., Harry F., Howard E., Ralph R. and Stan- 
ley E. John married Sadie Williamson. Joseph W. married Rhoda 
A. Barbee, and their four children are Hazel E., Mary L., Pearl E. and 
Harry W. Harry F., who is a practicing physician, married Lida C. 
Williams. Howard married Viola Eulitt, and has a daughter named 
Gwendolyn. 

While a good business man Mr. Rapp has not neglected the inter- 
ests of the community and is a member of the board of trustees of 
the township. He and wife belong to Old Town ]\Iethodist Episcopal 
Church. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 911 

Charles C. Bridwell. As president of the Portsmouth College of 
Business, at Portsmouth, Ohio, Charles C. Bridwell is ofifieially con- 
nected with one of the leading educational institutions of the kind in 
this section of the state. The school is well equipped with all the 
modern apparatus necessary for giving instruction in the required 
branches of study, and its many students are especially trained for 
business pursuits. A native of Scioto County, IMr. Bridwell was born 
in Nile Township, a son of William Bridwell, and grandson of James 
Bridwell, both of whom were born in Ohio. 

His great grandfather, Thomas Bridwell, was born and bred in 
Virginia. Coming from there to Ohio when young, he became a 
pioneer of Adams County. He first bought a tract of timber one and 
one-half miles south of Jacktown, and after living there .several seasons 
moved to Nile Township, Scioto County, where he. bought land, im- 
proved a farm, and was there engaged in tilling the soil until his 
death, at the age of seventy-five years. His wife, whose maiden name 
was Lydia Jordan, survived him, and with her youngest son moved 
to fronton, where she spent her closing years of life. She reared two 
daughters and five sons. 

Born in Adams County, Ohio, James Bridwell was reared to agri- 
cultural pursuits, and after his marriage bought the farm which he 
had assisted his father in clearing from its original wildness. Dis- 
posing of that in 1837, he moved to Scioto County, locating in Nile 
Township, where he purchased a tract of timbered land. A small part 
of it had been cleared, and in the opening a log cabin, with a stick 
and earth chimney, had been built. He soon built a small hewed 
log house, which the familj^ occupied a few years, and later erected 
a commodious two-story house of hewed logs, and was there a resident 
until his death, at the early age of forty-seven years, in the mean- 
time having by dint of perserving industry put much of the land 
under a good state of cultivation. He married Mary Ann Humble, who 
was born in Adams County, Ohio, a daughter of James and IMary 
(Cross) Humble, pioneers of that county. She survived her husband, 
living until eighty-one j^ears of age. 

One of a family of ten children, AVilliam Bridwell was born, 
January 20, 1834, on the home farm in Adams County. He grew to 
manhood, however, in Scioto County, acquiring his education in the 
rural schools of Nile Township. Reared to hal)its of industry and 
economy, he worked as a farm hand during his early days, and having 
saved his earnings sul)sequently bought land in "Washington Town- 
ship, and was there engaged in general farming and stock-raising untU 
1908. In that year, having accomplished a satisfactory work as an 



912 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

agriculturist, he moved to Portsmouth, where he has since lived retired 
from active business. 

William Bridwell has been twice married. He married first, at the 
age of twenty-five years, E.sther Ann Harmon, who was born in Nile 
Township, where her father, ^Middleton Harmon, was an early settler. 
She died two and one-half years after their marriage, leaving a child 
that died at the age of four years. He married second, November 3, 
1867, Sarah Compton, who was born in Green Township, Adams 
County, Ohio, October 10, 1840, a daughter of George Compton. Her 
grandfather, Samuel Compton, was born in Virginia, of English an- 
cestry. In 1796 he migrated to Kentucky, and ten years later, in 1806, 
he settled in Adams County, Ohio, near the present site of Dunkin-sville, 
and there cleared and improved a homestead, on which he lived and 
labored until his death. He married Elizabeth Harper, whose father 
was the original proprietor of Harper's Ferry, Virginia. Their son, 
George Compton, a native of Adams County, served an apprenticeship 
at the tailor's trade when 3'oung, and followed it at home for many 
years. He subseciuently turned his attention to agriculture, and hav 
ing bought land in Jefferson Township there carried on general farming 
the remainder of his life. The maiden name of the wife of George 
Compton was ^lary Aim Ham. She was born in ]\Iaine, a daughter of 
Jonathan and Sarah (Snow) Ham, natives of the same state. Jonathan 
Ham moved with his family from Maine to New York, and after living 
for a time at Sodus Bay started for Illinois, going first to Pittsburgh 
with teams, and thence down the Ohio river on a boat. His health 
being very poor, the family stopped off at Maysville for him to re- 
cuperate, but he died very soon after landing, and the family changed 
their plans, locating in Adams County, Ohio, instead of going to 
Illinois. His widow survived him for a number of years, and later in 
life went to Illinois to spend her last years at the home of a daughter. 
]\Irs. Mary Ann (Ham) Compton lived to be nearly four score years 
old. She reared eleven children. William and Sarah (Compton) 
Bridwell were the parents of six children, as follows : Alice, Morris, 
Charles C, ^Mary, James, and Lida. 

Obtaining a good education when young, Charles C. Bridwell re- 
jnained beneath the parental rooftree until attaining his majorit3^ 
Coming then to Portsmouth, he was for eight years employed as a 
clerk in the office of the Drew-Selby Shoe Company. The ensuing 
year he traveled on the road as a commercial salesman, after which he 
was bookkeeper for tht Heer Shoe Company, and its successor, the 
Irving Drew Company, for eight years. ]Mr. Bridwell then pui'chased 
from W. J. Henry, an interest in the Portsmouth College of Business, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 913 

of which he has siiu-e heen the president. Under the able and judicious 
management of ]Mr. Bridwell this school is fast winning a prominent 
position among the leading business colleges of Southern Ohio, its 
courses of study embracing such branches as will best fit a young man 
for a successful business career. ^Ir. Bridwell was reared in the 
Methodist faith, and is now a member of Trinity Metliodist Episcopal 
Church. 

On May 19, 1915, ]Mr. Bridwell was united in marriage to Mayme 
Ethel Lusher, daughter of ^h\ and I\lrs. Charles Lusher of I\Iercerville, 
Gallia Count}^, Ohio. 

Henry Schomberg. For more than half a century ^Mr. Schomberg 
was identified with the Hanging Rock Iron Region, where he began his 
career as a farm laborer and was also engaged in the trade of butcher 
for a number of years. He won prosperity and lived Mith honor in 
the community, and was one of the Grand Army men in this section. ]Mr. 
8chom1)erg had one of the best rural homes in Harrison Township of 
Scioto County. 

Henry Schomlierg was born in Hanover, Germany, October 15, 1845, 
a son of Lewis and Henrietta (Clausing) Schomberg. The parents 
left Germany in 1850 and emigrated to the United States, locating at 
Clinton Furnace, in Southern Ohio. Lewis Schomberg had been identi- 
fied with the iron industry in Germany, and was employed for twelve or 
thirteen years in that line after coming to Ohio. He was a tender at 
the Clinton Furnace for two years, then moved to the Scioto Furnace, 
and while living there his first wife died. He married Elizabeth Dauver, 
and later came to Harrison Township in Scioto County and engaged in 
farming. He was born in 1819 and died in 1872. By his first wife 
there were four children, of whom three are here mentioned : Mary, 
wife of Adam Minch, of Chillicothe, Ohio ; Charles, Avho lives in the State 
of Alabama ; and Henry. 

Henry Schomberg was about five years of age when the family made 
its journey to America, and his education was practically all the result 
of American schools. After leaving public school he found employ- 
ment and means of self-support in a railway section gang. He was not 
yet sixteen years of age when the war broke out, and in 1864 he enlisted 
in Company I of the One Hundred and Fortieth Regiment. That was 
a "hundred-day" regiment, but he served 120 days, and at the expira- 
tion of his term of enlistment he was honorably discharged. His patri- 
otism led him to enlist again, and this time he went out as a member 
of the Fifth Ohio Cavalry and remained until the close of the struggle 
between the North and the South. His patriotic duty performed, Mr. 



914 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Schomberg returned to Scioto County, and again took up work as a 
section hand on a railroad. He learned the butcher's trade, and for 
eighteen years combined that trade with the vocation of farmer. From 
that time all his time and energies were devoted to farming. Mr. 
Schomberg, as the product of his own labors and good management, 
became the owner of a fine farm of 161 acres situated three miles north 
of Sciotoville. 

On July 9, 1868, occurred his marriage to Jemima Wait, who is a 
native of Scioto County. To their marriage have been born a large 
family of nine children : J\Iary, wife of Charles Gordon, and the 
mother of four children ; Lewis, who married ]\Ial)el Haney and has two 
children ; Frances, wife of Southerton B. Mansfield, and has two chil- 
dren; Ruth, wife of Charles Ballinger; Anna, wife of Charles Sparks, 
and the mother of four children ; P^oster C, who married Sarah Knore 
and has six children ; Henry H., who is married and has four children ; 
Stella, the wife of Frank Knore and the mother of four children; and 
Xora, wife of Alvin Lewis, who has two children. Mr. Henry Schom- 
berg had thirty grandchildren. He was a member of the Christian 
Church, being a charter member of his home church and acting as 
elder. In politics he was a democrat. He departed from this life 
January 30, 1916. 

John Geddes Peebles. A man of pronounced ability and forceful 
individuality, John Geddes Peebles, for many years one of the more 
prominent and influential citizens of Portsmouth, was widely known as 
one of the original "iron masters" of Lawrence County, and as a prime 
mover in the development of one of the leading industries of his times. 
A son of John Peebles, he was born, November 30, 1813, in Ross County, 
Ohio, about five miles from Chillicotlie, on a farm located on Lick Run, 
coming from thrifty Scotch stock. 

His paternal grandfather, William Peebles, was born in Scotland, 
in the Town of Peebles, near Edinburgh, and was but an infant when 
taken by his parents to the North of Ireland, where he was reared and 
educated. Coming to America in early manhood, he settled in Cumber- 
land County, Pennsylvania, and at the breaking out of the Revo- 
lutionary war raised a company of soldiers, which he equipped 
at a personal expense of £400. Going to the front with his brave 
men, he was wounded in a battle with the Hessians at Flat Bush, Long 
Island, on August 28, 1776, and died from the wounds received on Sep- 
tember 5, 1776, his remains ])eing buried on Long Island. After his 
death the United States reimbursed his family in Continental money, 
and also gave to his family a deed to 2,000 acres of not very 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 915 

valuable land. The widow and her three children were left in such 
limited eireunistances that it was necessary to dispose of the land as 
early as possible, regardless of price. 

John Peebles was born in Shippenburg, Pennsylvania, November 21, 
1769, and was scarce seven years of age when his father was killed in 
battle. He served an apprenticeship at the cabinet maker's trade when 
young, and lived in his native state until after his marriage. In 1807 
he started with his family for Ohio, traveling with wagons to Browns- 
ville, Pennsylvania, where he purchased a flatboat on which he proceeded 
to Pittsburgh, from there coming down the Ohio River to Portsmouth, 
Ohio, arriving in June, of that year. Continuing the journey with 
wagons, he settled in Chillicothe, where he followed his trade five years. 
Subsequently buying land near Paint Creek, he built a distillery, which 
he operated until it burned. He then invested in a tract of timbered 
land situated five miles from Chillicotlie, on Lick Run, and having erected 
a sawmill began to manufacture furniture from the beautiful cherry 
and walnut timber that was found in abundance on his place. Soon 
trading that land for property in Chillicothe, he lived there until 1819, 
Avhen he started with his family for the prairies of Illinois. Putting his 
household goods on a keel boat, he sailed down the canal, landing in 
Portsmouth, Ohio, April 2, 1819. Mrs. Peebles objected strongly to 
going to Illinois, and as he was satisfied with Portsmouth and its future 
prospects he decided to remain, and with that end in view bought a 
hotel on Front Street. A short time later he established a factory for 
the making of nails, which was then a slow process, twenty-five pounds 
a day being all that one man could make, and as the price of nails ranged 
from 50 to 75 cents per pound the venture was not profitable, and lasted 
but a brief period. 

Soon after his settlement in Portsmouth, John Peebles became active 
in public matters, and was often chosen to offices of trust and responsi- 
bility. He was a member of the first board of health of the city ; was 
custodian of standard measures of Scioto County ; was assessor ; overseer 
of the poor ; trustee of Wayne Township ; secretary of the county agri- 
cultural society; and was a director of the Columbus and Portsmouth 
Turnpike Company. He spent his last years at Hanging Rock, Scioto 
County, his death occurring October 22, 1846. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Margaret Rodgers, was a daughter of Richard and Rachel 
Rodgers. She was born in Shippenburg, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1777, 
and died in Scioto County, Ohio, August 28, 1847. They reared nine 
children, as follows: William; Rachel R. married Robert Hamilton; 
Elizabeth became the wife of Dr. Hempstead ; Fanny D. ; Jane F. mar- 
ried Robert Wood; Richard R. ; Margaret R.; Joseph S. ; and John 
Geddes. One child, Margaret, died in infancy. 



916 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

John Geddes Peebles was educated in the pioneer schools of Ports- 
mouth, and at the age of fourteen years entered the employ of his uncle, 
John McCoy, a' merchant in Chillicothe, with whom he remained eighteen 
months. Returning then to Portsmouth, he was variously employed 
until 1836, when, in company with Capt. Francis Cleveland, he em- 
barked in mercantile pursuits. The panic of 1837 put him out of busi- 
ness, as it did many others who had been much longer established. In a 
paper bearing the date of February 18, 1830, the following advertise- 
ment appeared : 

' ' Removal 
"Portsmouth Hotel and Stage Office 

"John Peebles has removed to the commodious and well-known stand 
which he formerly occupied on the corner of West and Water Streets, 
near the steamboat landing (owned by E. Glover, deceased). The estab- 
lishment is now fitted up at considerable expense and care, and he is 
prepared with accommodations more extensive and more convenient 
than he has ever before been able to ofifer the public. Persons desirous 
of taking a passage on either stage or boats, or those coming off at any 
time, day or night, will find this stand conveniently suited, and atten- 
tion will be given at all hours. To those persons who have favored him 
with their custom he returns his grateful thanks and solicits a con- 
tinuance, and assures every one who may favor him with a call that no 
attention will be wanting to contribute his utmost to their comfort and 
convenience. 

"The commission business is continued by John Peebles as usual and 
attention paid to the landing of steamboats. Those who may favor him 
with consignments may depend on their business being conducted with 
care and goods disposed of agreeable to instructions at price as low as 
any regular house." 

Mr. Peebles built up a very good business as a commission agent, 
taking goods consigned to him on a flatboat and trading along the river 
until he converted them into cash. He was variously employed until 
1842, when he located at Pine Grove Furnace, where he worked at car- 
pentry, in the meantime making a practical study of the iron industry. 
In 1844 he was made manager of the entire business at the furnace, and 
continued in that capacity ten years. In 1844, with his brother, Joseph 
S. Peebles, and Samuel Coles, he invested his savings, acquiring a half 
interest in botli the Pine Grove Furnace and the Hanging Rock Coal 
Company. Possessing excellent business judgment and discrimination, 
and being wise in the management of his affairs, Mr. Peebles met with 
rare success in his ventures, in a few years acquiring wealth and prestige 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 917 

ill the business world. He was also conspicuously identitied with many 
other commercial enterprises, among the most prominent of which may 
be mentioned the following : the Belfont Iron Works Company ; the Ash- 
land Coal Company ; the Ashland Coal and Iron Railway Company ; the 
Lexington and Big Sandy Railroad Company; and the Portsmouth 
National Bank, of which he was a director and later president from 
1875 until his death. 

Mr. Peebles was a resident of Ironton from 1864 until 1865, when he 
returned to Portsmouth and bought a commodious residence at the 
corner of Second and Washington streets. His death was caused by an 
accident, on October 30, 1901, He was active in business until his 
death, and devoted much of his time and means to charitable works. 
Liberal in his benevolence, he was ever ready to lend a helping hand to 
any good work, being of a deeply sympathetic and charitable nature and 
animated by the broadest spirit of humanitarianism. He served as 
president of the Board of Trustees of the Children's Home for many 
years, and was deeply interested in its affairs. Greatly interested in 
everything concerning the public, he took much pleasure in clipping 
items of interest from papers and magazines, and had in his library sev- 
eral volumes of interesting articles that he had thus accumulated, and 
from which Mr. Evans in his history of Scioto County copied extensively. 

Mr. Peebles married, June 10, 1835, Martha Rose Steele, who w^as 
born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1816, a daughter of Robert 
Steele. 

Of the nine children born of their union, five grew to years of 
maturity, namely : Robert, deceased ; John, of whom a brief sketcli may 
be found elsewhere in this volume; Margaret J., deceased; Mary E., 
and Richard R., deceased. The daughters remained Avith their father, 
caring tenderly for him in his old age. Both were equally active with 
him in church affairs and works of benevolence, ever ready to serve the 
suffering and needy. Since the death of her sister Margaret, ]Miss Mary 
Peebles has traveled extensively both at home and abroad. 

Jacob Offrere. M.D. Prominent among the pioneer physicians of 
Ohio w-as Dr. Jacob Offrere, who came to Scioto County in the very early 
part of the nineteenth century, and for several years thereafter in the 
pursuance of his professional duties traveled everywhere about the qouii- 
try on horseback, with saddle-bags well filled, at that time there having 
been no drug stores in which prescriptions could be filled. The Doctor 
was born October 4, 1775, in Virginia. 

His father, Samuel Offrere, removed with his family from Virginia 
to Pennsylvania, settling in Lancaster County, where he purchased the 



918 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

large estate that was later owned by President Buchanan. He subse- 
quently lost all of his property by endorsing for others. He married 
Sarah Carpenter, a daughter of Doctor Carpenter, who was long engaged 
in the practice of medicine in Philadelphia. The Carpenter family came 
to the United States from Germany, where the name was spelled "Zim- 
merman," meaning a carpenter. 

Jacob Offrere studied medicine with his maternal grandfather, Doctor 
Carpenter, in Philadelphia, and after receiving his diploma came to 
Ohio, thinking his prospects for a successful career better in a newer 
country. Locating in Scioto County, he bought land in Wayne Town- 
ship, a few miles from Portsmouth, and there erected a brick house on 
the river banks. In 1816 he removed to Portsmouth, where in addition 
to practicing his profession he was interested in numerous enterprises 
and filled various offices of trust. He served as township treasurer of 
Wayne Township ; was road supervisor ; a member of the local board of 
health ; and also served as county treasurer of Scioto County. The Doc- 
tor invested largely in land, first buying 400 acres from the Govern- 
ment, and later buying extensive farm lands. He also became a large 
owner of city property of value. He continued a resident of Portsmouth 
until his death, December 12, 1859, at the age of four score and four 
years. 

Doctor Offrere married ^Mary Harness, who was born in October, 1767, 
and died April 9, 1843. Their only child, Harriet C. Offrere, became 
the wife of C. A. M. Damarin. 

Trace N. Dixon. While the Hanging Rock Iron Region is espe- 
cially noted for its mineral resources, its farms are by no means a 
small factor in the total aggregate of wealth, and farming is one of 
the best lines of business carried on in this section of southern Ohio. 
One of the younger representatives of the agricultural class is Trace 
N. Dixon, whose home is at Dixon JNIills in Harrison Township of 
Scioto County. Mr. Dixon spent a number of years in other lines of 
work, but is now quietly and profitably engaged in planting, cultivating 
and harvesting, and is one of the highly respected residents of his 
community. 

Trace N. Dixon was born at Dixon Mills, a well known center of 
settlement in Scioto County, July 24, 1879, and is a son of Noah and 
Eunice (Dodge) Dixon. His father was born in Vinton County, Ohio, 
and his mother in Scioto County. The father still lives at Dixon 
Mills. There are two living children, the older brother being George 
Dixon of Athens, Ohio. 

Trace N. Dixon was reared on a farm at Dixon Mills, was educated 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 919 

in the public schools, and after the age of sixteen left his books to 
take up employment on the farm. For several years he was in the 
service of the Norfolk and Western Railroad Company. He drilled 
water wells for the company all along its system for two years, and 
was then employed in the terminal for some time until returning to 
his farm. Mr. Dixon has sixty-six acres of highly improved land at 
Dixon Mills, and raises the staple crops and also considerable stock. 

Mr. Dixon was married July 3, 1911, to Bertha Shuler, who was 
born in Scioto County. They have one child. Earl, born July 17, 1914. 
In politics Mr. Dixon is a republican. 

FiLMORE E. MussER. Endowcd by nature with mental abilities of a 
high order and the will and disposition to work, Filmore Musser is amply 
qualified for the responsible position he holds as cashier of the Ohio 
Valley Bank at Portsmouth, both by temperament and by training. He 
is a native-born citizen of Portsmouth, as was his father, John Musser, 
Jr., whose birth occurred in this city, February 3, 1834. 

John Musser, Sr., his paternal grandfather, was born in 1794 in 
Pennsylvania, and was there reared and married. Following the tide of 
emigration to Ohio in 1823, he settled at Portsmouth, where he followed 
his trade of a shoemaker for a time, continuing a resident of the place 
until his death, at the age of eighty-one years. His second wife, the 
grandmother of Filmore, came to Portsmouth from New York, her native 
state, her maiden name having been Mary Jane Ball. She survived her 
husband twelve years, passing away at a good old age. 

John ]\Iusser, Jr., a millwright by trade, spent his entire life in 
Portsmouth, dying at the age of seventy-six years, in 1910. He married 
Isabelle Jones, who was born in Portsmouth, a daughter of Charles Jones. 
She lived to be seventy-five years of age. To her and her husband four 
children were born, as follows: Filmore, Jesse, Nevin; and John, de- 
ceased. 

Having been graduated from the Portsmouth High School with the 
class of 1875, Filmore Musser taught school the following winter in 
Greenup County, Kentucky, and during the succeeding two years was 
similarly employed in Green Township, Scioto County. In 1878 and 
1879 he taught in the historic "Red Schoolhouse, " in Clay Township, 
near Portsmouth, and in 1880 was principal of the Hamden Junction 
High School. He was subsequently engaged for a while in newspaper 
work as compositor and reporter. 

In April, 1881, Mr. Musser was made deputy county auditor under 
George L. Dodge. In 1886 he was elected county auditor of Scioto 
County, and was continued in office by subsequent re-elections until 1893, 



920 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

serving with eminent ability and efficiency. While thus employed, he 
devised and put into use entirely new methods regarding the manage- 
ment of his office, and with Charles Kinney, county treasurer, arranged a 
system of accounting betw^een the two offices. To such an extent was 
the work systematized that at the completion of his term the auditor's 
office was regarded as a model for the state, and to his methods, which 
have been continued by his. able successors, is due the fact that the 
offices of the auditor and treasurer of Scioto County are considered the 
best conducted of any in the state. ]\Ir. Musser also, in connection with 
the county commissioners, devised a plan for funding the bonded indebt- 
edness of the county, making a lev}^ for the annual payment of a portion 
of the debt, the continuance of which to the present time has left the 
county free of debt. 

After his retirement from the auditor's office, ]\Ir. ]\Iusser was for 
three years publisher of the Portsmouth Tribune. In the years 1897 and 
1898 he was employed as an expert accountant bj- the state auditor, and 
in 1899 he prepared maps of the City of Portsmouth and of that part 
of Scioto County lying east of the Scioto River for the decennial ap- 
praisement of 1900. From 1903 until 1910 he served as city auditor, 
and has since filled his present responsible position as cashier of the 
Ohio Valley Bank. 

On December 29, 1885, Mr. Musser married Elona Oakes, a daughter 
of Joshua and Temperance (^Marshall) Oakes, of whom a sketch is given 
on another page of this volume. Two children have blessed the union 
of Mr. and Mrs. Musser, Ethel and Isabel. They are members of the 
Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church, and have reared their daughters 
in the same religious faith. 

Peter James Kline, M. D. Forty years of active service as a physi- 
cian at Portsmouth constitute a valid claim for recognition of Doctor 
Kline in any history of that community, while as a soldier, citizen and 
man of broad and generous interests he stands among the best of Ohio's 
citizenship. 

Peter James Kline was born on a farm in Buckskin Township of 
Ross County, July 4, 1840, and represents substantial pioneer stock in 
that section. His first American ancestor was J. Henry Kline, who 
came from Strassburg, Germany. His grandfather, Peter Kline, was 
born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, July 5, 1792, and moved 
into Ohio about 1825, locating near Chillicothe, where his work brought 
about the improvement of a farm which was his home until his death 
on July 25, 1849. He married Isabel Dewey, w^io was born June 9, 
1792, and died July 4, 1865. They reared nine children, named 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 921 

Henry L., Daniel, Jauies, Jane E., Isabel, Mary, Jacob D., Peter L., 
and William. 

Col. Henry L. Kline, father of the Doctor, was born on a farm in 
Cumberland County, October 25, 1813, and was about twelve years of 
age when he came to Ohio. His education was from the rural schools 
of his native state and of Ross County. On reaching his majority, he 
found much of the country still unoccupied and bought a tract of wild 
land, devoted some years to its clearing and then settled down to the 
substantial business of agriculture, which he followed successfully, 
acquiring other land from time to time, until his holdings amounted to 
400 acres. His death occurred on the farm in Ross County, Ohio, 
October 9, 1879. 

Col. Henry Kline married Mary E. ^leCreary, who was born in 
Ross County, September 1, 1817. Her father, James ^IcCreary, who 
was of Scotch-Irish ancestry, was born in Pennsylvania, December 31, 
1769, and married Jane ]\Ienary. She was born in Kentucky, Decem- 
ber 11, 1786. Her father was the distinguished Gen. James M. ]\Ienary, 
who was born in Pennsylvania, June 9, 1760, was a soldier on the 
patriot side in the Revolution and also was in the War of 1812. Gen- 
eral Menary was a pioneer citizen of Ohio, having located in what was 
later Ross County in 1796. At that time only one log cabin occupied 
the present site of Chillieothe. He and fifteen other families were 
banded together and lived under the shelter of a blockhouse located a 
few miles out of Chillieothe, on the high land overlooking the Scioto. 
That was his home for two years, and in the meantime he secured a 
tract of government land near the present slate mills, five miles from 
Chillieothe, and occupied that until his death. General Menary was 
in command of a squad of militia which in 1812 started to reinforce 
the garrison at Detroit, but learning of Hull's surrender returned 
home. General Menary married Mary Blair, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania, October 30, 1765, and died April 29, 1850. During his young 
manhood Henry Kline joined the state militia and rose to the rank 
of colonel. He and his wife reared but two children, Doctor Kline and 
his sister, Mary. 

Doctor Kline spent his youth in Ross County in the two decades 
before the war. The district schools furnished him instruction until 
fourteen, after which he pursued his studies in the Salem Academy 
of his native county until 1862. Then began his career as a soldier, 
with enlistment on August 7, 1862, in Company I of the Eighty-first 
Ohio Volunteer Infantry, for a term of three years. He was made 
corporal June 27, 1864, advanced to sergeant November 10, 1864, and 
mustered out with his company July 13, 1865. The battles and cam- 



922 HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 

paigns which form the record of the Eighty-first were also his own, 
as he was always ready for rations and for duty. He was on the 
famous march to the sea, and went later to AYashington to participate in 
the grand review. 

His return from the army marked the beginning of his study of 
medicine, under Dr. Samuel C. Hamilton, and later at the Miami Medi- 
cal College in Cincinnati, where he was graduated March 1, 1871. His 
first office for practice was in South Salem. In 1873 he matriculated 
in the Bellevue Hospital Medical College of New York and graduated 
from the course in 1874. In the same year, on April 1st, he located 
in Portsmouth, which city has. ever since been his home. Doctor Kline 
was treasurer of the Hempstead Academy of Medicine in 1881 and its 
president in 1883. He was pension examiner under President Hayes 
and President Harrison, and reappointed in June, 1897, by President 
]\IcKinley, and is still serving. For six years, between 1886 and 1895, 
he was a member of the city board of education, and was appointed a 
member of the board of health on April 19, 1878, and served four years. 
He is a member of Bailey Post, No. 161, Grand Army of the Republic, 
having served as its commander. His church home is at the First 
Presbyterian. 

March 2, 1871, the day after his graduation from Miami, he married 
Elida E. Pricer. Her grandfather, John Pricer, a native of Pennsyl- 
vania, was a pioneer in Ross County, and followed his trade as a car- 
penter at Salem until his death. David H. Pricer, Mrs. Kline's father, 
was born in Salem, Ross County, in 1823, acquired a good education 
for the time, and followed teaching and farming. His later years were 
passed in Portsmouth. His Avife, whose maiden name was Amanda 
AVilson, was born in Buckskin Township of Ross County in Februarj^, 
1825, and died March 11, 1889. Her father, John Wilson, a native of 
Pennsylvania, settled among the first in Buckskin Township, cleared 
a farm from the wilderness and lived there until his death. Doctor and 
Mrs. Kline have reared one daughter and one son. The daughter, 
Lena, is the wife of Edward P. Reed and they have a daughter, Eve- 
line. Charles Flint, who was the Doctor's only son, graduated from 
the Bellevue Hospital ^Medical College, New York, and was associated 
with his father in practice until death took him prematurely from a 
useful career. The son married Jean Barr, who survives and has two 
children, Elmer and Flint. 

Doctor Kline is a member of the Hempstead Medical Society, the 
Ohio State ^Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. An 
intimate view of Doctor Kline and estimates of his character and activi- 
ties are found in the Evans History, which says: "As a physician, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 923 

Doctor Kline has the confidence of all his medical brethren and of the 
public generally. He stands easily at the head of his profession. It 
would not be too much to say that he is the most popular physician and 
man in Portsmouth. Everyone likes him. He can always be found at 
the front in every project for the public good. He possesses a wonder- 
ful store of human sympathy and is constantly expressing it. Make 
up a full catalogue of all the civic and domestic virtues and he ex- 
presses them all. 

"lie is a pleasant, easy and entertaining speaker. He is on good 
terms with his aiidience at all times, and can always touch a popular 
chord, but on the occasions of soldiers' reunions he is unexcelled. He 
is always at home at a soldiers' reunion. He never misses one in fifty 
miles of his residence, and one is seldom held without his being invited. 
A camp-fire warms his heart at once, and on these occasions, while he is 
speaking, he is again the young soldier of 1861-65. He has never for- 
gotten the enthusiasm of his youth, and he can bring some of it back 
to his old comrades. He has an inexhaustible fund of war remi- 
niscences and is constantly adding to his store. He has forgotten noth- 
ing of his army life, and can tell of it so that his hearers feel that 
they were eye-witnesses. There is nothing so interesting as an older 
person who can recall his youth in such a way as to make his hearers 
feel the fire of it. It is to be hoped the Doctor will hold the spirit of 
his youth as long as he lives, and as to that his friends wish he may 
rival Methuselah." 

Lelia Newton. Talented and cultured, and well informed in his- 
tory and literatur(?,"^Iiss Lelia Newton, librarian of the Carnegie Library 
at Portsmouth, has filled the position for many years, devoting her ener- 
gies almost exclusively to her duties to the public, and to her faithful 
and efficient work is attributed much of the library's success and health- 
ful growth. A daughter of Henry Townsend Newton, she was born in 
Portsmouth and here has spent her entire life. 

Miss Newton's grandfather, Capt. John Newton, was born, bred and 
married in Maryland. In 1830, responding to the lure of the West, he 
started with his family for Ohio, crossing the mountains with teams to 
Pittsburgh, thence down the river to Cincinnati. He was subsequently 
captain of a steamer plying between that city and New Orleans, and 
continued his residence in Cincinnati until his death. His wife, Avhose 
maiden name was Eliza Townsend, was born in Maryland, and died, 
while yet in middle life, in Cincinnati. 

One of a family of six children, Henry Townsend Newton was born, 
October 16, 1817, in Baltimore, Maryland, and as a boy of thirteen 



924 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

years came with his parents to Ohio. He grew to manhood on a farm 
near Cincinnati, and as a young man became engineer on a steamboat, 
continuing in that position several years, but later being foreman in 
a machine shop at Cincinnati. Removing with his family to Portsmouth, 
]Mr. Newton assumed the foremanship of ]\Iurray-^Ioore Machine Shop, 
and remained a resident of the city until his death, May 25, 1890. 

Mr. Newton married, in Cincinnati, Maria Brown, who was bom in 
Belfast, Ireland, of Scotch ancestry. Her parents, James and Mary 
(.McClure) Brown, were born in Belfast, of Scotch parentage, and about 
1823 came to America, settling in Cincinnati, where Mrs. James Brown 
died. Mr. Brown subsequently moved to Illinois, and there spent the 
closing years of his life. ]\Irs. Henry T. Newton survived her husband, 
passing away October 25, 1895. She was the mother of four daughters 
and two sons, namely : Edwin, Laura, Viola, Emma, Louis, and Lelia. 

Soon after her graduation from the Portsmouth High School, Miss 
Lelia Newton began her present career as assistant to Colonel Wharton, 
the founder of the library, and at his death, in 1883, succeeded him 
as librarian, and has held the position since, performing the duties 
falling upon her in that capacity with credit to herself, and to the 
satisfaction of the officers and patrons of the library. Miss Newton is 
a member of the First Presbyterian Church, and was formerly an active 
worker in the Sunday school. 

Samuel Randall Ross. A hale and hearty man, strong both men- 
tally and physically, Samuel Randall Ross, of Portsmouth, bears with 
ease his burden of ninety-seven j-ears, and having retired from busi- 
ness activities is enjoying a well-earned leisure. He was born April 8, 
1819, in Oxford, Chenango County, New York, a son of Samuel Ross. 
His paternal grandfather, Andrew Ross, was born April 20, 1741, of 
Scotch parentage or ancestry, and spent his last days in Oxford, New 
York, dying in 1819. He married Sarah Wheeler, who was born in 
Newark, New Jersey, a daughter of Capt. Nathaniel Wheeler. 

Samuel Ross was born in New York City, February 21, 1786, and as 
a young man was graduated from Princeton L'niversity. Becoming a 
Methodist Episeopa-l minister, he preached six years in Virginia. Going 
to Oxford, New York, in 1815, he turned his attention to agricultural 
pursuits, and united with the Episcopal Church. In 1816 he was 
elected warden of Saint Paul 's Church, and remained as warden, or 
vestryman, until 1820. Late in life he sold his farm and removed to 
Elmira, New York, where he resided with his children until his death, 
in 1861. 

Samuel Ross was twice married. The maiden name of his second 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 925 

wife, mother of the subject of this sketch, was Maria Randall. She was 
a daughter of Robert and Lucy (Pendleton) Randall, and widow of 
Alvan Stephens. She survived him, and died at the home of one of 
her daughters, in Auburndale, IMassaehusetts. She reared six children. 

Graduating from the Oxford Academy, Samuel Randall Ross went 
to Cortland, New York, as a boy of sixteen years, and from that time 
until 1844 was employed as a clerk in the general store of his uncle, 
William Randall. He then came to Ohio, locating in Portsmouth, then 
a city of about four thousand inhabitants. He came by way of the 
railroad to Buffalo, thence via the lakes to ]Michigan City, Indiana, 
where he took the stage for Cincinnati, which he reached after travel- 
ing three days in the most expeditious way then possible. From Cin- 
cinnati he came by boat to Portsmouth, where he established himself as 
a wholesale grocer, commission and forwarding merchant, and contin- 
ued thus employed until 1861. He then transferred his business to 
Cincinnati, and there continued until his retirement from active pur- 
suits. He is now living in Portsmouth, in the dwelling to which he 
took his young bride in 1847, sixty-nine years ago. 

Mr. Ross married, September 7, 1847, Elizabeth Kinney, a daughter 
of Washington and ]\Iary (Waller) Kinney. She was born in Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, February 29, 1824, and died October 28, 1898. A short 
sketch of her grandfather, Aaron Kinney, son of Peter Kenney, a Revo- 
lutionary soldier, may be found elsewhere in this volume. Mr. and 
Mrs. Ross reared three children, namely : Anna Randall Ross, George 
Kinney Ross, and Thomas Waller Ross. 

Thomas Waller, M. D. Distinguished as the first physician to set-, 
tie in Scioto County, Hon. Thomas Waller, M. D., was conspicuously 
identified with its growth and development, and as an early resident 
of Portsmouth filled many public positions of trust and responsibility. 
A son of John and Mary (Mathews) Waller, he was born September 14, 
1774, in Stafford County, Virginia. 

He received superior educational advantages for his time, and in 
1797 was graduated from William and ]\Iary College, in Williamsburg, 
Virginia. Going soon after that important event to Kentucky, he was 
for a short time engaged in mercantile business at Washington, JMason 
County. Subsequently attending medical lectures at the Pennsylvania 
Medical College, in Philadelphia, he was graduated from that institu- 
tioiT with the degree of ]M. D., and immediately began the practice of 
his profession in Kentucky. 

On January 10, 1800, Doctor Waller married Elizabeth Macfarlane, 
daughter of Capt. Andrew INIacfarlane, of Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, 



926 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

who served as captain of a company in the Revolutionary war. Going 
with his bride to Pennsylvania, Dr. Waller remained there a year, and 
then, in 1801, accompanied by his wife and infant child, he came to 
Ohio, traveling on horseback to Wheeling, and thence by boat to Alex- 
andria, Ohio, arriving there on June 21, 1801. Purchasing property 
there, the Doctor immediately began the practice of his profession, and 
in 1803 was elected justice of the peace. At the organization of Scioto 
County he had the distinction of being the first representative, to the 
State Legislature elected from that county. Subsequently removing to 
Portsmouth, Dr. Waller continued his residence in this city until his 
death, July 19, 1823. 

Doctor Waller was the first postmaster of Portsmouth, holding the 
position at the time of his death. He was the first president of the 
Commercial Bank of Scioto County, which was organized in 1817, being 
the first institution of the kind in the county. He was also the first 
president of the first council of the Town of Portsmouth, and was one 
of the first wardens of the first vestry of All Saints' Church. 

Mrs. Waller died in 1824, in Portsmouth. Nine children were born 
of the union of Doctor and Mrs. Waller, namely: Margaret, who mar- 
ried Capt. Francis Cleveland; Mary married Washington Kinney; 
William died unmarried; Thomas married Miriam Coppage; Elizabeth; 
Hannah died unmarried; John married Mary J. Baldridge; Susannah 
married John P. Berry ; and George A. married Jane Davey. 

Andrew Jackson Finney. One of the prominent old citizens of 
Portsmouth, whose span of life covers three-quarters of a century, Capt. 
Finney is a native of Scioto County, and the name has been identified 
with this section of the state for practically a century. He was a val- 
iant soldier during the war, has been a farmer and merchant, and has 
filled with credit and distinction many of the offices in township, city 
and county government. 

Andrew Jackson Finney was born in Bloom Township, Scioto 
County, October 2, 1840. His father was George H. Finney, who was 
born in the same locality in 1818. The grandfather, Martin Finney, 
was a native of Connecticut, came from that state to New York and 
from there to Ohio, and after a short stay at Marietta floated down the 
Ohio River on a raft of logs and landed at Portsmouth. Going into 
the dense wilderness that then covered this country he bought a tract 
of timbered land on the southwest quarter of Bloom Township. He 
lived there as a true pioneer, using his axe to clear away the forest 
and improving a farm which remained his home until his death at the 
advanced age of ninety-two. In spite of his extreme age he retained 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 927 

his mental faculties and also his sight and hearing fairly well until 
the end of his life. Martin Finney married Tryphosa Hall, who died 
at the age of eighty-five. The four children who grew up were George 
H., Julius, Laura and Melissa. 

George H. Finney was reared in Scioto County and when a young 
man took up the work of teaming to and from the furnaces, and that 
was his regular occupation for a number of years. In the meantime he 
had invested his savings in a tract of land adjoining the old homestead, 
and lived there a number of years. Though he was in middle life 
when the war broke out, he enlisted on August 10, 1862, in Company D 
of the One Hundred and Seventeenth Ohio Infantry, a regiment which 
was subsequently transferred to the artillery service, and after that he 
was in Company D of the First Ohio Heavy Artillery. With this com- 
mand he continued as a faithful soldier through its various campaigns 
and battles until honorably discharged and mustered out on June 28, 
1865. George H. Finney finally removed from his farm to Powells- 
ville and lived there until after the death of his second wife. His home 
thereafter was with his children and he died at Seiotoville at the age 
of seventy-eight. The maiden name of his first wife, the mother of 
Captain Finney, was Eliza Fullerton. Her parents, James H. and 
Hannah (Smith) Fullerton were natives of Greenbrier County, Vir- 
ginia, and were early pioneers of Scioto County. Mrs. George H. Fin- 
ney died at the age of twenty-five. He married for his second wife, 
Adeline Fullerton, a sister of his first wife. She left two children, 
George H. and Eliza A. 

Andrew Jackson Finney spent his youth on a farm, was educated 
in the rural schools, and was already an independent farmer in this 
county when the war broke out between the states. On the 20th of 
April, 1861, only a few days after President Lincoln issued his first 
call to put down the rebellion he enlisted for the three months service 
in Company D of the Twenty-second Ohio Infantry. He was with that 
regiment until August 19, 1861, and a little more than a year later, on 
October 27, 1862, he enlisted for the term of three years in the Eighth 
Independent Company of Ohio Volunteer Sharpshooters. In this com- 
mand he was appointed sergeant March 9, 1863, was promoted to first 
sergeant November 19, 1864, and was mustered out with his company 
on July 19, 1865. He was with the first Ohio troops that aided in 
the struggle with the South, and was in service for several weeks after 
the practical ending of hostilities. 

After the war Captain Finney was engaged in farming until 1871, 
and then sold his place and spent about a year in Greenup County, 
Kentucky. Returning to Scioto County in 1872, he turned his atten- 



928 HANGING BOCK IRON REGION 

tion in 1873 to merchandising in Powellsville, and was one of the chief 
business men of that village for ten years. At the same time he filled 
the office of postmaster from January, 1873, until December, 1882, at 
which date he resigned. In 1870 Captain Finney was elected land 
appraiser of Vernon Township, serving one year in that office. His 
business career has been marked almost continuously by some form of 
public service. He was justice of the peace in Greene Township from 
1873 to 1879, was treasurer of that township from 1881 to 1883. In 
1882 Mr. Finney was elected sheriff of Scioto County on the republican 
ticket. In that election he received 3,286 votes against 2,915 given to 
his competitor, AVilliam B. Williams, making his majority 371. At his 
re-election as sheriff in 1884 he received 4,241 votes against 3,080 for 
his opponent, John Newdoerfer, making his majority at that time 1,161. 
All the older citizens of Scioto County recall the capable and efficient 
manner in which Captain Finney discharged his duties as sheriff. 

On retiring from the sheriff's office, Captain Finney became a cloth- 
ing merchant for about sixteen months in Portsmouth, and then opened 
a stock of retail groceries. His business rapidly grew in this line 
and in 1892 it was reorganized as both a M'holesale and retail store, 
under the name of A. J. Finney & Sons. While Captain Finney was 
general manager of the business, his son, Oscar T. Finney, was travel- 
ing salesman, and Walter A. Finney was city salesman. 

Captain Finney was elected clerk of the Common Pleas Court, No- 
vember 8, 1898, and was re-elected in 1901, serving two full terms. In 
1912 he was appointed market master of Portsmouth, holding that office 
until a change of municipal administration. In April, 1914, he was 
elected a justice of the peace by the city council to fill an unexpired, 
term. Everyone in Scioto County regards Captain Finney as one of 
the men who have been most influentially connected wuth the history 
of this county for the past fifty years. He is a member of Bailey Post 
of the Grand Army of the Republic. On February 22, 1862, after his 
first service in the war and before his second enlistment, he married 
Lovina Wait, daughter of Benjamin F. and ^lary (Smith) Wait, of 
Wait's Station. 

Henry Becker. Now serving as county recorder of Scioto County, 
to which office he w^as elected in November, 1914, Henry Becker has 
lived all his life in this county, and for a number of years has been 
more or less actively associated with both business and public interests. 

Henry Becker was born on a farm in Washington Township of 
Scioto County, April 15, 1866. His father, Fred Becker, was born in 
Wuertemberg, Germany, where his parents spent all their lives. He 



HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 929 

and two other brothers came to the United States. Of these, Adain 
settled in Washington Township, while Henry subsequently returned 
to his native land and died there. Fred Becker attended school regu- 
larly during his youth in Germany, and after leaving school set out for 
the United States, making a passage which required fifty-two days, and 
landing at New York City. Coming West he lived for a time in Ken- 
tucky, then moved to Indiana, and finally arrived in Portsmouth. 
About his first employment in this section of Ohio was with Stephen 
Morrow in the latter 's distillery. He next bought a partly improved 
farm in Washington Township. This land had water power, used for 
the operation of a combined saw and grist mill. These mills were under 
his management for a number of years, while he also superintended the 
operation of a farm, and his death occurred there in his sixty-fourth 
year. 

Fred Becker married IMary A. Walz, who was born in Germany and 
came with her widowed mother and several other children to America, 
settling in. Covington, Kentucky. Mrs. Fred Becker died at the age of 
seventy years. The six children reared by her were : Mary, who mar- 
ried Jesse Rose; Lena, who married Ed Nagle; Kate, who became the 
wife of C. B. Longman; Henry; Emma, wife of John H. Gillen; and 
Fred, a resident of Washington Township. 

Henry Becker grew up on the farm in Washington Township, 
attended the rural schools, was well trained in farm and mill work, and 
subsequently graduated from the Portsmouth Business College. After 
the completion of his course at the business college he spent five years 
in the employ of the Adams and Southern Express Company, and then 
clerked for seven years with the Drew-Selby Shoe Company. He re- 
signed to become deputy county treasurer one term, then returned to 
the Shelby Shoe Company for one year, and was next appointed and 
served two years as city clerk. Mr. Becker has thorough qualifications 
for his present office as county recorder and they were well recognized 
by the citizens who voted him into that office. 

April 29, 1897, he married Grace Donaldson, who was born in 
Portsmouth, daughter of W. W. and Margaret J. Donaldson. Mr. and 
^Irs. Becker have three children: Margaret M., Fred W., Jr., and Dor- 
othy Elizabeth. The family are members of the Trinity Methodist 
Episcopal Church, and Mr. Becker is affiliated with Magnolia Lodge of 
the Knights of Pythias and with the Loyal Order of ]\Ioose. 

Pearl Edgar Selby. A practical man of affairs, keen-sighted and 
enterprising. Pearl Edgar Selby, vice president and general superin- 
tendent of the Selby Shoe Company, at Portsmouth, has met with 



930 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

eminent success in his business career, his success being wholly due to 
his energy and real worth. A son of George D. Selby, of whom a 
sketch may be found elsewhere in this work, he was born and educated 
in Portsmouth. 

After his graduation from the Portsmouth High School, Mr. Selby 
served an apprenticeship at pattern making in the plant of the Drew- 
Selby and Company. Mastering that trade, he worked in the various 
departments of the company's manufactory, becoming thoroughly fa- 
miliar with the art of shoe making in its every detail, and thus fitting 
himself for the advanced position he now occupies. In 1892 Mr. 
Selby became an active member of the Drew-Selby Company, and 
superintendent of one of its departments. Applying himself diligently, 
he soon learned the details of the business as he previously had of 
the work, and ere long was recognized as an important factor in the 
shoe business of the world. The Selby Shoe Company is known far 
and wide as one of the largest in the country, and in its growth and 
upbuilding Mr. Selby has been largely influential. He is likewise 
identified with various other enterprises of much importance. 

Mr. Selby married June 8, 1892, Blanche E. Smith, and they have 
two children, Harold Rea and Gladys. Mr. and Mrs. Selby are mem- 
bers of the Bigelow INIethodist Episcopal Church. 

IMark Selby. Endowed with a business sagacity and patience that 
has enabled him to master the minutia of details, and an active mind 
that reaches far beyond the exigencies of the moment, Mark Selby, 
vice president, secretary and sales manager of the Selby Shoe Company, 
is closely associated with the promotion of the manufacturing and 
mercantile interests of Portsmouth, his home city. A son of George 
D. and Lydia (Webster) Selby, he was born and brought up in Ports- 
mouth, acquiring his first knowledge of books in the public schools of 
the city. 

Being three years a student in Ohio Wesleyan University, in Dela- 
ware, Ohio, Mark Selby found employment in the factory of the Drew- 
Selby and Company, beginning work in a humble capacity, and per- 
severing until thoroughly acquainted with the various branches of shoe 
making. Upon the organization of the Selby Shoe Company, in 1906, 
Mr. Selby was made vice president and secretary and sales manager, 
and has since filled these responsible positions efficiently and success- 
fully. 

He is also secretary of the ]\Iitchell Manufacturing . Company and 
one of the organizers and a director of The Standard Supply Company, 
both concerns of Portsmouth. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 931 

Mr. Selby married first, in 1898, Miss IMaude Grimes. She died in 
1905, leaving one child, Christine Selby. ^Ir. Selby married second, 
in 1912, JMiss Adelaide Hare. Fraternally Mr. Selby is a member of 
Patriarch Lodge No. 154, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, and 
also belongs to the college fraternity Phi Kappa Psi. 

Roger Selby. A rising young business man of Portsmouth, Roger 
A. Selby, production and office manager of the Selby Shoe Company, 
one of the leading industries of Poi'tsmouth, is ably performing the 
duties devolving upon him, and while advancing his own prosperity is 
ever mindful of the. higher interests of his employees, and of the firm 
with which he is connected. He was born in Portsmouth, a son of 
George D. Selby, and is of English ancestry, being a lineal descendant 
in the seventh generation from one Jeremiah Selby, who emigrated 
from England to America in Colonial days, and for many years there- 
after was engaged in the practice of medicine in Connecticut. 

Acquiring his preliminary education in the Portsmouth schools, 
Roger Selby entered the Scientific Department of Yale University, from 
which he was graduated as a mechanical engineer. He was for three 
years private secretary to Congressman Henry Baman and then for two 
years occupied a similar position with United States Senator Theodore 
E. Burton. Returning then to Portsmouth, Mr. Selby entered the 
office of the Selby Shoe Company as secretary to the superintendent, 
and later took up his present work. 

James S. Frizell, M. D. Scioto County claims as one of its able 
and representative physicians and surgeons the popular citizen whose 
name introduces this paragraph and who is engaged in the successful 
general practice of his profession in the attractive Village of Buena 
Vista. Greater interest attaches to his success and prestige by reason 
of the fact that he is a native of the village in which he now maintains 
his home and in which his birth occurred on the 3rd of January, 1858. 
Here also he is fully upholding the professional honors of the family 
name, for his father likewise was numbered among the prominent and 
honored physicians of Scioto County. 

Dr. James Savage Frizell is a son of Dr. William Alexander Frizell 
and Artemitia (Kenyon) Frizell. Dr. William A. Frizell was born in 
Lewis County, Kentucky, situated directly across the Ohio River from 
Scioto County, Ohio, and was a son of Joseph Frizell, who was an 
extensive land owner and prominent agriculturist of Northern Ken- 
tucky, where also he built up a profitable enterprise in the manufactur- 
ing of salt. He was a citizen of much influence in his community and 



932 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

was an honored veteran of the war of 1812. When of venerable age 
]ie came to Scioto County and here he passed his declining years at 
Buena Vista. The maiden name of his first wife, the grandmother of 
him whose name initiates this article, was Mary Savage, and she was 
but twenty-three years of age at the time of her death. She was sur- 
vived by three children, James A., who became a successful wholesale 
druggist in the City of Dayton, Ohio; Mrs. Margaret Thompson, and 
Dr. William A. For his second wife he married a widow named Fox- 
worthy, and they became the parents of one daughter, Anna. 

Dr. William A. Frizell was reared to adult age in Kentucky, where 
lie attended the common schools of his native county and thereafter 
took a collegiate preparatory course in a private school in Greenup 
County. He studied medicine under the preceptorship of an able and 
prominent physician at Felicity, Clermont County, Ohio, and then 
entered the Ohio Medical College, in the City of Cincinnati, in which 
he was graduated with the degree of Doctor of Medicine. After having 
been engaged in practice for a time at Rome, Adams County, he re- 
moved to Scioto County and established his residence at Buena Vista, 
where he built up an excellent practice, to which he devoted his atten- 
tion for a number of years. He then removed to the old homestead of 
his wife's parents, in Adams County, and continued in the practice 
of his profession in that county and across the Ohio River in Kentucky, 
in which state he maintained an otifice at Vaneeburg. He was engaged 
in the active work of his profession for more than forty years, earnest 
and self-abnegating in his services to suffering humanity, and animated 
by that sympathy that transcends mere emotion to become an actuating 
power for helpfulness. Revered for his sterling character and worthy 
accomplishment, Dr. Frizell passed to the life eternal in 1889, at the 
age of sixty-five years. His widow now owns and resides upon the 
old Kenyon homestead, in Adams County, which was the place of her 
birth and upon which her husband passed the closing years of 
his life, as previously intimated in this article. She is a daugh- 
ter of Daniel and Rebecca (Zorns) Kenyon, both of whom were 
born in Kentucky, whence they came to Ohio and numbered them- 
selves among the pioneers of Adams County, where they passed the 
remainder of their lives. Dr. William A. and Artemitia (Kenyon) 
Frizell became the parents of four children, of whom four are living, 
Dr. James S., of this review; Mary, Ella and William, the last men- 
tioned being now a successful jeweler and optician at Vaneeburg, Lewis 
County, Kentucky. 

To the public schools of Buena Vista Dr. James S. Frizell is in- 
debted for his early educational discipline, and he determined when 



llAX(ilX(; ROCK IKON REGION !):^,:! 

a youth to prepare liitiiself fur tlie profession in whicli his father had 
gained definite success and precedence. With this end in view he was 
finally matriculated in the Ohio Medical College, his father's alma 
mater, and in the same he was graduated as a member of the class of 
1880 and with the well earned degree of Doctor of Medicine. Later 
he completed a regular course in the celebrated Jeflfei-son Medical Col- 
lege, in the City of Philadelphia, and this time-honored institution 
likewise conferred upon him the degree of Doctor of Medicine, in 1884. 
Though thus admirably fortified for his exacting profession, Doctor 
Frizell has not permitted himself to lapse in his careful study of 
medical and surgical science, but keeps in close touch with the advances 
made in the same. He avails himself of the best standard and period- 
ical literature of his profession and further reinforces himself througli 
his active membership in the Scioto County Medical Society, the Ohio 
State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. 

Soon after his gi'aduation in the medical college Doctor Frizell en- 
gaged in active practice in liis native town of Buena Vista, and this 
section of Scioto County has continued the stage of his zealous and 
effective professional endeavors during the long intervening period of 
more than thirty years. ITe controls a large and representative prac- 
tice and is known aiid honored as one of the able and faithful mem- 
bers of his profession in this section of the state. Tie served twelve 
years as a member of the board of United States pension examining 
surgeons. for Scioto County. 

As' a citizen Doctor F'rizell is essentially progi-essive and public- 
spirited, his political allegiance being given to the repiiblican party 
and both he and his wife being zealous members of the Presbyterian 
Church, in which he has served as elder of the church at Buena Vista, 
as well as superintendent of its Sunday School. In Adams County he 
is affiliated with Rome Lodge, No. 535, Ancient Free & Accepted 
Masons; his capitiilar atifiliation is with Vanceburg (Kentucky) Chap- 
ter, Royal Arch Masons; and he holds membership also in the Order 
of the Eastern Star; Buena Vista Lodge, No. 842, Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows, and the adjunct organization, the Daughters of Re- 
bekah ; the Junior Order of United American Mechanics, and the 
Loyal Order of Moose. 

On the 31st of October, 1883, was solemnized the nmrriage of Doctor 
Frizell to Miss Caroline IMiller, who was born and reared at Buena 
Vista and who is a daughter of John and Frederica (Ukelar) Miller, 
the former of whom was born in Hesse-Cassel and the latter in P.aden, 
Germany. Doctor and Mrs. Frizell have no children, but in their home 
is being carefullv reared Anna Miller, a half-sister of I\[rs. Frizell. 



934 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Homer Selby. As purchasing agent of the Selby Shoe Company 
of Portsmouth, Homer Selby is actively identified with one of the fore- 
most industries of Scioto County, and is successfully devoting his every 
effort toward the advancement of its interests. A native born citizen 
of Portsmouth, he acquired his elementary education in public schools 
of the city, and in 1904 was graduated as a mechanical engineer from 
the Case School of Applied Science, at Cleveland. 

Thus finely equipped for a business career, Mr. Selby entered the 
factory of the Selby Shoe Company, with which he has since been 
connected. Familiarizing himself with business methods, he developed 
and demonstrated great aptitude for commercial activities, and since 
assuming his present position as purchasing agent is doing much 
towards maintaining the firm 's reputation as one of the most prosperous 
and substantial concerns of the kind in the county. 

Mr. Selby has been twice married. He married first, \n 1905, Laura 
Moody. She died in 1906, leaving one child, Mary Louise Selby. Mr. 
Selby married second, in 1913, Lola Davis, and there is one child, 
Sara, born to this union. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Selby are mem- 
bers of the Bigelow Methodist Episcopal Church. Fraternally Mr. 
Selby is a thirty-second degree Knight Templar Mason, and also be- 
longs to the Phi Delta Theta college fraternity. 

Orin L. Veazey. On the fine farmstead, in Nile Township, Scioto 
County, where he now holds prestige as one of the representative agri- 
culturists of the younger generation, Mr. A^eazey was born on the 6th 
of October, 1886, and he is a scion of one of the old and honored fam- 
ilies of Southern Ohio. Progressiveness and well ordered enterprise 
are shown by him in connection with the operations of his well improved 
farm, and in his native county he has secure place in popular esteem, 
his status in the community clearly entitling him to recognition in this 
history of the Hanging Rock Iron Region. 

Mr. Veazey is a son of Armour King Veazey and Dolly (Kennedy) 
Veazey, the former of whom was born in Greenup County, Kentucky, 
on the 13th of November, 1857, and the latter of whom was born in 
Scioto County, Ohio, a member of a sterling pioneer family of this 
section of the Buckeye State. Joseph W. Veazey, grandfather of him 
whose name introduces this article, was born and reared in Pennsyl- 
vania, from which state he went as a cadet to the United States Mili- 
tary Academy, at West Point, in which institution he was graduated. 
He was a valiant soldier in the war of 1812, and at the time of the 
Civil war, though venerable in years, he gave excellent service in drill- 
ing recruits for the Union army. From the old Keystone State he 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION :>;}5 

eame iu an early day to Ohio and settled in JacksoJi County, whence 
he later removed to Greenup County, Kentucky. Within a short tiine 
thereafter he came again to Ohio and established Ids residence at Tron- 
ton, Lawrence County, where he became associated with William I). 
Kelley in the iron business. Finally he purchased a farm near Soutii 
Point, that county, and there he continued to reside until 1879, hi.s 
wife having died in 1877. In the year 1879 he removed to Scioto 
County, but he passed the closing period of his life at Ashland, Ken- 
tucky, in the home of his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Williams, his death 
there occurring when he was in his eighty-fifth year. As a young inan 
he married Miss Elizabeth Campbell, who w-as born in Beaver County, 
Pennsylvania, the youngest of the eleven children of William Camp- 
bell, who was a native of Scotland, where all of the children were l)orn 
except Mrs. Veazey. Immigrating with his family to the United States, 
William Campbell established his home at Beaver Falls, Pennsylvania, 
where he engaged in the work of his trade, that of cabinetmaker, this 
continuing to be his vocation until the time of his death. Mrs. Eliza- 
l)eth Veazey died in 1877, and of the seven sons and two daughters 
three were born in Pennsylvania, three in Kentucky and three in Ohio. 

Armour King Veazey was an infant at the time of the family re- 
moval from Kentucky to Lawrence County, Ohio, where he was reared 
and educated and where in his youth he was for several terms a suc- 
cessful teacher in the district schools. In 1879 he passed the winter 
in the lumber woods of Louisiana and in the spring he returned to 
Lawrence County. In 1881 he removed with his family to Scioto 
("ounty and purchased a farm on the Buena Vista turnpike road, in 
Nile Township, where he continued as a successful and honored rep- 
resentative of the agricultural and stock-growing industries for more 
than thirty years. He then sold the farm to his son, Orin L., of this 
review^ and he has since lived retired, in this township. The maiden 
name of his first wife was Dolly Kennedy, and she was summoned to 
the life eternal in 1891, being survived by two children, Stella and 
Orin ]j. A jiumber of years later Armour K. Veazey wedded Miss 
lAicille Honaker, who was born at Quincy, LewMs County, Kentucky, a 
daughter of Dr. Cornelius Honaker and Emily (Storer) Honaker. Two 
children were born of this union, one who died in infancy and a son. 
Morris H., who is living with his grandmother in Nile Township. 

Armom* K. Veazey is a stalwart republican in politics, has served 
as notary public and as a member of the school board of his district, 
the latter position having been held by him for sixteen years, in Nile 
Township. He has served also as township assessor and as a member 
of the township board of health. 



<J3() HANGING KOCK 1J(()\ KKiilON 

Oriii L. \'eazey was I'eared to manhood oji the farm wliieh he now 
owns and occupies, and is indebted to the public schools of Scioto 
("ounty for his early educational discipline. He has given unwavering- 
allegiance to the basic industries of agriculture and stock-growing and 
his success has been on a parity with his energ\' and progressiveness. 
In politics he gives unfaltering support to the cause of the republican 
party, and he is now serving as justice of the peace, of which office 
he has been the incumbent since 1908. At the age of twenty-one years 
he was elected coiistable of Nile Township, a position in which he served 
two years. Mr. Veazey is past noble grand of Buena Vista Lodge, 
No. 842, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and he attends and sup- 
poi'ts the Methodist Episcopal Church at Buena Vista, his wife being 
a member of the same. 

Ill 1907 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Veazey to Miss Belle 
Metzger, who was born in Lewis Township, Brown County, Ohio, and 
who is a daughter of David and Mary E. (Shinkle) Metzger. David 
Metzger was born in Lewis Township, Brown County, on the 28th 
of December, 1851, and on the same farm was born his father, Joseph 
Metzger, the date of whase nativity was August 16, 1817. The latter 
was a son of Conrad Metzger, who was born in Pennsylvania, of sturdy 
German ancestry, and whose father came to Ohio when well advanced 
in years, the closing period of his life having been passed at Circle- 
ville, Pickaway County. Upon coming to Ohio from the Keystone 
State Conrad Metzger became a pioneer settler in Brown County, 
where he purchased a tract of heavily timbered land and instituted the 
reclamation of a farm, in what is now Lewis Township. He contributed 
his quota to the civic and industrial development of Brown County, 
where he continued to reside on his farm until his death, when about 
seventy years of age. His son, Joseph, succeeded to the ownership of 
the old homestead farm and there continued to reside until his death, 
in 1887. He married Mis.s Nancy Watson, who was born in Clermont 
County, this state, on the 31st of May, 1815, and who was summoned 
to the life eternal on the 14th of January, 1882. 

David Metzger was one of a family of seven childr(^ii and was reared 
to manhood on the ancestral homestead farm, Ihe while he availed 
himself of the advantages of tlie common schools of the locality and 
period. He continiied to be associated with his father in the work 
and management of the home farm until he had attained to the age 
of twenty-eight years, when he purchased a farm in Clark Township, 
Brown County, whence he returned a few years later to the old liome- 
stead place. Later he was engaged in farming in Green Township, 
Adams County, and in 1899 he removed with his family to Nile Town- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 937 

ship, Scioto County. In 1909 he purchased the fine farm on which 
he now resides, in the same township, and he is one of the substantial 
farmers and honored citizens of this section of Scioto County. In 
1879 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Metzger to INIiss Mary E. 
Shinkle, who was born in Lewis Township, Brown County, in which 
county also were born her father, Walter Shinkle, and the latter 's 
father, Michael Shinkle. Michael Shinkle was a son of Jonathan 
Shinkle, who was one of the early settlo's of Brown County, where 
he reclaimed a farm from the wilderness and where he passed the 
residue of his life. His son, IVlichael, succeeded to the ownership of 
a portion of the old homestead and there passed his entire life as an 
industrious and pro.sperous farmer. He wedded Miss Sally Gardner, 
who likewise passed her entire life in Brown County. Walter Shinkle, 
who celebrated his seventy-seventh birthday anniversary in 1914, has 
been a lifelong resident of Brown County, where he has long been a 
representative agriculturist and stockgrower and where he has also 
been successful as a dealer in leaf tobacco. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Nannie Nowlin, was born near Lawrenceburg, Indiana, and 
is a daughter of Silas and IMary Nowlin, pioneers of the Hoosier State. 
David and Mary E. (Shinkle) Metzger reared seven children, of whom 
Mrs. Veasey was the third in order of birth. The names of the other 
children are as follows : Nannie, Jesse, Earl, Minnie, Lewis and John. 
Jesse married Miss Nellie Cameron and they have one son, Raymond. 
Earl wedded Miss Irene Sortraan and they have two sons. Minnie is 
the wife of Cleo Snyder. Mr. and IMrs. Veasey have one daughter, 
Elizabeth. 

Samuel G. Miller. There are many reasons why this sterling 
citizen of Scioto County should be accorded special recognition in this 
publication. He personally represented his native state as a valiant 
soldier of the l^nion in the Civil war and he has been a successful 
farmer and honored citizen of Scioto County for many years, his 
homestead farm ])eing in Clay Township, near the City of Portsmouth, 
where he is now living virtually retired. He came with his parents to 
this county when a child and here he has resided during the long inter- 
vening period of nearly seventy years — years marked by earnest and 
fruitful endeavor on his part. Further than this, he is a representative 
of families that were founded in Ohio more than a century ago, before 
the admission of the state to the union, and thus his personal and 
ancestrM history becomes one of consecutive indentification with the 
development and progress of this favored commonwealth. 

Mr. Miller was born in Columbiana Countv, Ohio, on the 24th of 



938 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

January, 1841, and is a son of Samuel and Emma (Peekham) Miller, 
both likewise natives of that county, where the former was born in 
1803 and the latter in 1801. The parents were reared and educated 
under the pioneer conditions in their native county and there their 
marriage was solemnized. In 1846 they removed to Scioto County, 
where the father developed an excellent farm and became a citizen of 
worth and influence, both he and his wife continuing their residence 
on their homestead farm until their death. Of their six children the 
subject of this review is the elder of the two now living, and Phoebe A. 
is the wife of John C. McNulty, of South Webster, Scioto County. 

Samuel G. Miller was five years old at the time of the family re- 
moval to Scioto County, and he was reared to maturity on the old 
homestead farm, in Jefferson Township, in the meanwhile availing 
himself of the advantages of the common schools of the locality and 
period. He continued to be actively identified with agricultural opera- 
tions until the outbreak of the Civil war, when he did not long delay 
response to the call of patriotism, as shown by the fact that, in July, 
1862, he enlisted as a private in Company C, Ninety-first Ohio Volun- 
teer Infantry, which was assigned to the Eighth Army Corps. After a 
short period of service the regiment was transferred to the Depart- 
ment of West Virginia, and with his command Mr. Miller continued 
in active service until the close of the war. He endured his full share 
of hard.ships and perils and took part in numerous engagements, 
among which may be mentioned the following: Cloyd's Mountain 
(or Farm), ]\Iartinsburg, New River, Ilalltown, Stephenson's Depot, 
Winchester, Fisher's Ilill and Cedar Creek. Mr. Miller was never 
wounded or captured, and continued with his regiment until the close 
of the war. He was mustered out in June, 1865, and duly received 
his honorable discharge, after a record that will ever give honor to 
his name. His continued interest in his old comrades in arms is mani- 
fested through his affiliation with Bailey Post, No. 164, Grand Army 
of the Republic, in the City of Portsmouth. 

After the close of the war Mr. Miller returned to Scioto County, 
and here he has continued to be identified with agricultural pursuits 
during the long intervening years. In politics Mr. Miller has never 
wavered in his allegiance to the republican party and in earlier years 
he was an active worker in its local ranks, besides which he was called 
upon to serve in various minor offices in his township, including that 
of township assessor. His life has been guided and governed by the 
liigliest principles of rectitude and honor and he has not been denied 
the fullest measure of popular confidence and esteem. For the past 
eight years he has served as superintendent of the Sunday School of 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 939 

Valley Chapel, of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and for seven 
years he has held also the position of class leader in this church, of 
which both he and his wife were devoted and valued members. 

On the 22d of November, 1866, was solemnized the marriage of ^Ir. 
Miller to IMiss Margaret J. ]\Ieek, who was born in Iowa but who was 
reared and educated in Carroll County, Ohio. Of the children of this 
union three are now living: Charles B., who was born February 8, 
1868, wedded 3Iiss ^Margaret Dall and they reside on a farm near 
Wheelersburg. Scioto County; Edward G., who was born September 
20, 1878, and who is a successful farmer of Clay Township, Scioto 
County, married Miss Elizabeth Bobst ; and IMary, wdio was born March 
7, 1884, is wife of Orville Gable, likewise a farmer of Scioto County. 
There are also eight grandchildren. IMrs. Miller died March 2, 1910, 
and was buried in Greenlawn Cemetery, Portsmouth. 

Aakon T. Noel. The owner of a specially valuable farm of forty 
acres, in Precinct No. 1, Clay Township, Scioto County, and this town- 
ship has represented his home from the time of his nativity, the while 
he stands as a sterling and popular scion of one of the old and influen- 
tial pioneer families of Scioto County, with wdiose history the family 
name has been worthily identified for more than a century, its original 
representatives here having come to the beautiful Scioto Valley prior 
to the admission of Ohio to the Union. 

Aaron T. Noel was born in Clay Township on the 24rth of April, 
1842, and has been concerned with the agricultural interests of his 
native township from his youth to the present time, his present farm, 
while not of great area, being equipped with the best of permanent 
improvements and its fertility being of the highest, as shown by the 
fact that the land is valued at $600 an acre. Mr. Noel is a son of Aaron 
and Catherine (Orm) Noel, both likewise natives of Scioto County, 
where the former was born July 13, 1807, and the latter on the 19th 
of May, 1814. Mrs. Noel passed to the life eternal on the 25th of 
February, 1864, and her husband survived her by more than thirty 
years, his death having occurred April 1, 1895, when he was nearly 
eighty-eight years of age. They became the parents of six sons and 
five daughters, whose names and respective dates of birth are here 
noted : Nathan :\I., March 8, 1833 ; Josiah 0., April 17, 1835 ; Anna E., 
September 7, 1836; John P., April 5, 1839; Elizabeth F., October 18, 
1840: Aaron T., April 24, 1842; jMary C, June 30, 1844; Jacob S., 
April 20, 1847; Oscar B., August 1, 1849; Margaret J., February 6, 
1853; and Sarah M., Augu.st 20, 1857. After the death of the wife 
of his young manhood Aaron Noel wedded i\Iiss Rhoda P. Severns, who 



940 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

was born December 27, 1833, and who died May 19, 1889, being sur- 
vived by one daughter, Henrietta R., who was born March 1, 1877. 

Aaron T. Noel was reared to manhood in Clay Township, where he 
received a good common school education, which has been effectively 
supplemented by the experience which he has since acquired in his 
association with men and affairs. Mr. Noel has not only become one 
of the representative agriculturists of his native township but has also 
been active and influential in public affairs of a local order — as a 
stalwart and well fortified advocate of the principles of the democratic 
party. As a young man he was employed two years in the office of 
the adjutant general of Ohio, and while his father was serving as treas- 
urer of Scioto County he held for two years the position of deputy 
treasurer, besides having been deputy county clerk for one year. His 
first elective incumbency was that of township clerk of Clay Township, 
in which position he .served three years. He was a member of the 
school board for nine years, was township assessor for two years, and 
at the present time holds the position of land appraiser of Clay Town- 
ship. From 1886 to 1890 he was internal revenue ganger at Portsmouth, 
and was elected in 1913 to serve for four years as justice of the peace 
of Clay Township. In the City of Portsmouth I\Ir. Noel is affiliated 
with Aurora Lodge, No. 48, Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; Solo- 
mon Chapter, Royal Arch Masons ; the council of Royal and Select Mas- 
ter, and the commandery of Knights Templars. 

On the 14th of December, 1865, Mr. Noel wedded ]Miss Sarah C. 
Stone, whose death occurred January 19, 1870. Of their children the 
eldest is Florence G., who was born September 12, 1866, who is the 
wife of James P. Appel and who has one daughter; Charles A., who 
was born July 1. 1868, died August 14, 1891 ; Thomas A. P. was born 
November 9, 1869. 

On the 9th of October, 1884, ]Mr. Noel contracted a second mar- 
riage, when Miss Edith Taylor became his wife. She was summoned 
to the life eternal on the 14th of March, 1911, and is survived by one 
daughter, Gurney ^largaret, who was graduated as a trained nurse 
and who now resides in Columbus. 

Milton Wesley Brown. The following paragraphs take up the 
chief points in the history of a family which has been identified with 
the Hanging Rock Iron Region for a century or more, and there are 
few families that illustrate a more substantial stock and to whom this 
section is more indebted for the elements of good character in its first 
settlers than the Browns. Milton Wesley Brown has spent the years of 
a long and useful life in Scioto County, is a veteran soldier of the Civil 
war and is now living largely retired at his home in Portsmouth. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 941 

Milton Wesley Brown was born on a farm in Marion Township, Pike 
County, Ohio, September 2, 1836. His father Royal Brown was born 
in Vermont, April 11, 1811, and was a son of David and Sally (Hubbard) 
Brown. Some years ago Milton W. Brown was elected the first presi- 
dent of the reunion of the Brown family, and fortunately his address is 
preserved and can be quoted for a very interesting account of the early 
origin and the principal facts in the Brown family history. The essen- 
tial paragraphs from this address are given as follows: 

"Daniel Brown, who was so miraculously saved from death in 
the massacre of the colony to which he belonged, was the ancestor of 
this branch of the Brown family in Ohio. It is one of the inherent 
qualities of the human heart to acquaint ourselves with our family tree, 
to dwell upon the trials endured and the honors enjoyed by one's ances- 
tors. Hence, by the promptings of this desire, we are here today. In 
1646 the ancestors, of our tribe emigrated from Scotland and settled in 
New England, in April of that year. There were eight families in the 
party. They located in what is now Massachusetts. They made them- 
selves homes in the wilderness, and prepared the best they could for 
the coming winter. On the 8th of November following, a light snow fell. 
That night the Indians visited the settlement, and taking the unsuspect- 
ing colony by surprise massacred the whole company except one child. 
The particular Brown who was the ancestor of this family had a wife, 
two daughters and three sons. One of the sons was named Daniel, 
eight years of age, who slipped out unnoticed by the excited savages and 
secreted himself behind the chimney. As soon as the Indians had finished 
their bloody work they departed and at daybreak little Dan crawled out 
of his hiding place and went into the- house to find his father, mother, 
two brothers and two sisters murdered and scalped. The child made 
his way alone through the forest fifteen miles to a settlement and gave 
the alarm. And from him, Daniel Brown, came our family. Dr. George 
Brown, D. D., of Pittsburg, and one of the principal founders of the 
Methodist Protestant Church, was a great-grandson of little Dan. This 
invincible little hero grew to manhood, married, and had three sons. 
One settled in New York and we have no record of him. One settled in 
Virginia and one in Vermont. Their names were Joseph, Amos and 
David. Dr. George Brown's father, General Jacob Brown, who com- 
manded the American troops at Lundy's Lane in 1814, was a grand- 
son of little Dan. Our great- great-grand father settled in Vermont, and 
we are of the Vermont limb. 

' ' Our grandfather David Brown was born in New York in 1783. He 
was married to Sallie Hubbard in Massachusetts, and moved to Vermont 
in 1813. lie went back to New York from whence he came to Ports- 



942 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

mouth, Scioto County, Ohio, in 1816. The Hubbards came fi'om Eng- 
land, and settled in what is now Massachusetts. The iirst of this tribe 
known was William Hubbard, who was born in England in 1621, and 
came to America in 1630. He was a minister of the Gospel from 1665 
to 1703 in Massachusetts. He was the author of a history of New Eng- 
land. Samuel D. Hubbard was born in Connecticut in 1799 and died 
in 1855. He was a member of President Fillmore's cabinet. When our 
grandfather David Brown landed in Portsmouth in 1816 he had just 
twenty-five cents in money left, but it seemed to be more than he thought 
he needed, so, agreeable to the custom of the times, he spent his last 
quarter for whiskey and was happy. He settled first on the Big Scioto 
river, but it being so sickly there he moved out to the Rocky Fork of 
Little Scioto, where he built a cabin. At first they had no floor, their 
bedstead was stakes driven into the ground and poles laid across, and 
all their belongings were moved on an old grey mare. Nothing daunted, 
they cleared out the brush, planted corn and potatoes, and Uncle Dow 
McKinney, who was a little boy and knew them, told me grandfather had 
turnips enough in the fall to feed the whole settlement. Afterwards he 
moved his family to what is now Stockdale in Marion township, Pike 
county where he turned his boys loose in the briars and swamps to 
root hog or die. But they had rugged constitutions, inured to hard- 
ship and the ground seemed to stick to them wherever they settled, and 
now their posterity owns a goodly share of the land in their community. 
I remember our grandfather as a short, fleshy old man with white hair 
who always had a kind word for us little boys. He was a great wrestler 
in his younger days and when General Jackson was a candidate for the 
presidency, he made the banter at a gathering of politicians at old Dan 
McKinney 's that he could throw down and man who voted against Gen- 
eral Jackson and' he received a broken leg in trying to make good his 
boast. He loved a slick horse trade as well as a cat loves cream, and 
that trait in his character is not wholly extinct in some of his posterity. 
Grandmother was a kindhearted, saintly woman, cherished an ardent 
love for the Christian religion and the Methodist church, and there was 
nothing I enjoyed more than going over to grandma 's and eating a piece 
of her cake that was kept on the hanging shelf and grandmother never 
forgot the cake. This was when I was a little boy, but it is still fresh 
in my mind. Our grandfather's children were eight in number in the 
order named: Ransom, Huldah, John H., Royal, David, Franklin, 
Nathan, William H. and Joseph Jackson. I remember going with father 
one morning to see the place where their house had burned the night 
before. The bottom logs were still slowly burning. This was before 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 943 

insuring property was the custom by farmers, and it was a heavy loss 
to the old folks. 

''Grandfather's children were all church members, instilled the 
principles of religion into the minds and lives of their children, always 
taking an interest in establishing schools and churches in the com- 
munity in which they lived, and as a result the Browns are a moral and 
law abiding people. So far, not a criminal belongs to the tribe. Not 
a saloon keeper nor a bartender can be found among them, and they 
were all loyal to their country and the Hag. Many of them went at the 
call of the nation to war, and gallantly fought, bled and suffered for 
freedom and the Union." 

Royal Brown, father of the citizen first named above, was three years 
old when brought to Ohio by his parents, and was reared amid such 
pioneer scenes as are glimpsed in the sketch already noted. He was 
converted in his youth and joined the Methodist Protestant Church, and 
being ordained as a minister of that denomination joined the Muskingum 
Conference. He had also learned the stonecutter's trade and built many 
stone chimneys for his neighbors. In Marion Township he bought a 
farm, and that was the home of his family many years and is now occu- 
pied by his son William B. Royal Brown was active in the ministry 
until late in life and was finally superannuated, and died in the eighty- 
fourth year of his age. 

Royal Brown was married August 18, 1833, to Rachel Beauchamp. 
She was the daughter of John and Elizabeth Pretty man Beauchamp. 
Her father was a native of England of French ancestry and her mother 
a native of Delaware and a kin to Dr. Solomon Prettyman, noted as an 
educator and college president, and also to Rev. Wesley Prettyman, who 
was sent as a missionary to Bulgaria, while there was persecuted and 
mishandled by the Mohammedans, and severely wounded, and finally 
returned home and spent his later years preaching in Ohio. Mrs. Royal 
Brown survived her husband about three years and died in her eighty- 
fourth year. She was the mother of eight children who grew up as 
follows: Harriet, who married Thomas Allard; Milton Wesley; Fran- 
cis Asbury ; John Sheppard ; Royal Benton ; David Tipton ; Rachel Ellen, 
who first married James Wallace and after his death Louis Nicholet; 
and William Beauchamp. The son Francis Asbury was converted in 
his youth and joined the Methodist Protestant Church, served three 
years during the war with the Ninety-First Ohio Infantry, and after 
being honorably discharged was ordained a minister, and was active in 
the work and service of the Methodist Protestant denomination for 
forty years, twice serving as delegate to the General Conference. The 



944 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

degree Doctor of Divinity was conferred upon him by the Kansas City 
University of the Methodist Protestant Church. 

Milton Wesley Brown, whose early life was sufficiently back in the 
last century that he knew many pioneer traditions that are entirely un- 
known to the present generation, had his school training from the dis- 
trict institutions, and inherited the lessons in morality and thrift and 
the training in habits of industry which were generally characteristic 
of his family. In his youth he assisted on the farm and lived with his 
parents until his marriage. He then bought a farm in IMarion Town- 
ship and went in debt for the property. At the end of about a year 
he sold this farm at considerable loss and then moved to Scioto County 
and bought a farm of 101 acres near Harrisonville. That was good 
land M'ith fair improvements and he set up as a general farmer and as 
a dealer in cattle. 

Mr. Brown had a notable career as a soldier during the Civil war. 
On August 11, 1862, he enlisted in Company G of the Ninety-First 
Regiment of Ohio Infantry and was appointed a corporal. Going to the 
front with the command he was one of twelve men with the Ninety- 
First Regiment which were assigned to duty in Blazer's Company of 
Scouts, Mr. Brown being a non-commissioned officer in that organiza- 
tion. Blazer's Scouts were organized for the express purpose of effect- 
ively opposing Mosby's Guerillas, which at that time were exceedingly 
troublesome. Mr. Brown remained with his command in its many 
raids and encounters with Mosby's men until October, 1864. His horse 
fell and he was thrown to the ground and his arm broken, and as a 
result of this injury he applied to General Crook for a furlough. The 
general at first said that no furloughs were being given to anyone at 
that time but then asked the petitioner what command he belonged to, 
and on being told Blazer's Scouts, General Crook said if he was to do 
anyone a favor it would be to a member of that band, and told Mr. 
Brown to go to his regimental surgeon, get a certificate of disability, and 
then go ta the division commander, General Rutherford B. Hayes, for 
approval. Mr. Brown did this and General Crook granted the furlough 
allowing him to return home. At the expiration of his furlough he 
started for Virginia to rejoin his command. Arriving in that state he 
learned that only a few days before Blazer's Scouts had been ambushed 
and most of them killed, wounded or taken prisoners. Commander Blazer 
himself being among those who were captured and taken to Libby 
Prison. Such being the status of affairs Mr. Brown rejoined his regi- 
ment in the regular command and continued with it until the close of 
the war. During his service he participated in many important cam- 
paigns and fights, and among other experiences was at Cedar Creek and 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 945 

saw Sheridan when he joined his troops after his memorable ride from 
Winchester, and saw him swing his cap — not a hat as the poem says — 
in order to rally his men and lead them to victory. Mr. Brown was 
lionorably discharged with his regiment in June, 1865, and returning 
home resumed farming and continued that vocation with unusual suc- 
cess for many years. His land under his good management was well 
improved and was increased by new purchases to upwards of 600 
acres. From 1894 to 1898 Mr. Brown was engaged in the sale of 
farm implements in company with his oldest son. In 1887 he was 
elected a county commissioner, serving two terms. In politics he is a 
republican. He is a charter member of the G. A. R., Scioto Post, of 
Harrisonville. His home remained on the farm until 1907, in which 
year he moved into Portsmouth and has since lived somewhat retired 
in that city. 

On August 21, 1856, Mr. Brown married Sarah AVood. She was 
born in Scioto County December 14, 1837. Her father, Simeon Wood, 
was born in Cayuga County, Ncav York, September 7, 1804. Abner 
Wood, the grandfather, was born in 1766, one of a family of sixteen 
children. In 1808 Abner Wood migrated to Ohio, accompanied by his 
family, and located at Alexandria, then the principal town in Scioto 
County. However, he soon moved to the east side, but in consequence of 
the sufferings from the fever and ague in 1812 he moved to Little Scioto 
and settled in Harrison Township, improving a farm and living there 
until his death at an advanced age. Simeon Wood, the father of Mrs. 
Brown, succeeded to the ownership of the old home farm and lived 
there until his death at the good age of ninety-two. He is buried in 
the Wood Cemetery. Simeon Wood married Emeline AVhite, who was 
born in Greenup County, Kentucky, a daughter of Daniel White, who 
came to Scioto County and lived and died in Greene Township. Mrs. 
Brown died February 20, 1906. On September 16, 1907, Mr. Brown 
married Mrs. Amanda (May) Cox. She was born in Lewis County, 
Kentucky, daughter of Benjamin Franklin May. She was unusually 
well educated, and possessed musical talent which was cultivated and 
which she employed for several years in association with her brother," 
the Rev. Frank May, a Baptist minister and well known evangelist. Miss 
May led the singing at many successful revivals over which her brother 
presided. As a young woman she married William Cox, a successful 
merchant at Concord, Kentucky, with a branch store at Poplar Flats. 
He died in 1895. Mr. Brown by his first wife had five children : Asbury ; 
Rachel, who died at the age of one year; Charles Wesley; Emmeline 
Plorenee ; and Edgar. Mr. Brown is a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal Church. 



946 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Peter Kae'S. An honored veteran of the Civil war, and for many 
years one of the useful and active citizens of Portsmouth, but now 
living retired in Florida, Peter Kaps has now passed the age of four 
score years, and from early childhood until the close of his mature 
activities Avas identified with this section of Ohio. 

Peter Kaps was born in the village of Landen, Bavaria, Germany, 
Slay 19, 1833. His father, Kasper Kaps, was born December 10, 1797, 
in the same locality of Bavaria, and was reared and educated there. 
For seven years he served in the army of the King of Bavaria, and 
later became a dealer in live stock. This occupation developed into 
an extensive business, and he made a number of trips to Paris on 
business missions, and often told his children about the fireside at 
home of his experiences. He usually went to Paris either through 
]\Ietz or Strassburg. In 1836 Kasper Kaps emigrated to America, 
accompanied by his wife and two children. The journey was made 
in a sailing vessel, which was six weeks after leaving the old country 
before it landed them in New York. After a brief stay in Albany, the 
family took passage on an Erie canal boat, and by way of that canal 
and Lake Erie reached the State of Ohio. They first visited in South- 
ern Ohio at Piketown, where a cousin, Michael Nessler, lived. This 
cousin advised Kasper Kaps to locate in Portsmouth, which he did. 
Here he was employed at various occupations, and had a pleasant home 
near the corner of what is now Court, Ninth and Chillicothe streets in 
Portsmouth. "He had land for a garden, and kept a cow, pigs and 
poultry, and while paying twelve and a half cents a bushel for corn, 
often sold the surplus eggs at four cents a dozen, and pork at two and 
a half cents a pound. Kasper Kaps frequently told his children of 
the sacrifices involved in leaving his native country, where he had a 
prosperous business, and the reason for coming to America was that 
his son might avoid the burdensome army service. In spite of that 
fact, two of his sons joined the army during the war between the 
states and saw active service. 

Peter Kaps was three years old when the family located in Ports- 
mouth, and while growing up on the homestead above mentioned, at- 
tended school whenever opportunity ofifered. It is recalled that he sat 
in the same seat at school with Jim Ashley, who afterwards rose to 
prominence as governor of Ohio. Miss Elizabeth Waller was their 
teacher. Besides school attendance Peter Kaps worked for Daniel 
Parshley at farming and bricklaying, and served a full apprentice- 
ship at bricklaying with Hon. William Newman, a brother of George 
Newman. The bricklayer's trade was his vocation until the l)reaking 
out of the war. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 947 

On November 9, 1861, Peter Kaps enlisted in Company K of tlie 
Fifteenth Regiment of Kentucky Infantry. He went south with the 
regiment, and was in all its movements and campaigns until the close 
of the war. Among the more important engagements in which he par- 
ticipated were those at Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Dallas, 
Resaca and Jonesboro, all of them critical and historic points in the 
great conflict between the armies of the North and South during the 
struggle for Tennessee and Georgia. At Chattanooga by appointment 
from General J. B. Steadman, Mr. Kaps served as Barracks' Com- 
mander from March 16 to May 2, 1864. Enlisting as a private, he was 
promoted until he held the rank of first lieutenant. He was honorably 
discharged and mustered out of the sei'vice January 14, 1865, at Louis- 
ville. 

After returning home Mr. Kaps formed a partnership with his 
brother in the contracting and building business, and that was the 
line of work in which he did his chief service while a resident of 
Portsmouth. During that time he had the contract for the building 
of many of the best residences and business blocks in the city. Mr. 
Kaps was actively engaged in business until 1904. In 1897 he had 
removed with his family to a farm, and lived there for several years. 
In October, 1910, having disposed of his various business interests, he 
removed to Florida, and purchased property at Zephyr Hill and St. 
Cloud, and now makes his home there, and as a pastime cultivates 
tropical fruits. 

On January 1, 1871, i\Ir. Kaps married Elizabeth Evans. She was 
born at Tipton, Staffordshire, England, a daughter of James Evans. 
Her father was a native of England, and on coming to America first 
located in St. Louis, was in business there a time, until an epidemic of 
cholera drove him away, when he removed to Newport, Kentucky, 
and was for a time employed at Swift's rolling mills. From there he 
came to Portsmouth, and for a number of years was head sheet roller 
at the Gaylord plant. His later years were spent in Portsmouth, but 
he died at Atwater, Ohio, at the age of eighty-seven. James Evans 
married Lydia Taylor, who was born in 1812 at Dudley, Staffordshire, 
England. ]\Ir. and JMrs. Kaps are the parents of three sons: James E., 
George P., and Henry H. ]\Ir. Kaps has been a republican since cast- 
ing his first vote for Abraham Lincoln, and among other things which 
illustrate his public spirit he served for five j-ears as a member of the 
city council of Portsmouth. 

James E. K.\ps. The contracting and building business which en- 
gaged the attention of Peter Kaps for so many years at Portsmouth is 



948 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

now continued through his sons under the name of Kaps Brothers. 
James E. Kaps, of this firm, is a practical man in the construction 
trades, and one of Portsmouth's leading business men. 

He was born at Portsmouth, September 12, 1872, a son of Peter and 
Elizabeth (Evans) Kaps, and grew up in his native city, with an edu- 
cation in the public schools. As a boy he began learning the trade of 
bricklayer, and in 1900 became associated with his brother, Henry H. 
Kaps, and their firm has since had a large share of the contracting and 
building business in Portsmouth and vicinity. 

Mr. Kaps was married January 22, 1905, to Cora Blanche Bussey, 
who was born in Vernon Township of Scioto County. Her father, 
Aaron Bussey, who was born in the same township and of parents who 
were among the pioneers of Scioto County, was reared on a farm, and 
farming has been his chief line of activity. For nearly twenty-five 
years, however, he has been engaged in public construction work as 
foreman for Samuel ]\Ionroe and Samuel ]\lonroe & Sons. Aaron Bussey 
married Flora Call, who was bom in Vernon Township, which was also 
the birthplace of her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Kaps are the parents of 
two sons: Russel and Howard. Mr. Kaps was reared in the Episcopal 
Church, while his wife is a Baptist. Fraternally, he is affiliated with 
the Massie Lodge, No. 115, Knights of Pythias. 

George P. Kaps. The second of the sons of Peter and Elizabeth 
(Evans) Kaps, George P. Kaps, was born at Portsmouth, September 
12, 1875, grew up in that town, and received his education from the 
public schools. At the age of fifteen he began learning the trade of 
bricklayer, and has made that trade the basis of his business career. 
At the present time he is foreman in the bricklaying department for 
the firm of Kaps Brothers. 

George P. Kaps was married in 1900 to Martha Barbee. She was 
born in Portsmouth, a daughter of William A. and Mary (Gable) Bar- 
bee, and is a sister of Mrs. Albert Turner, under whose name a sketch 
of the family will be found on other pages. Mr. and Mrs. Kaps are the 
parents of six children, named Carl, Ruth, Edith, Helen, George P., Jr., 
and Margaret. 

Henry H. Kaps. The junior member of the firm of Kaps Brothers, 
contractors and builders, at Portsmouth, is one of the younger business 
men of that city, and has found the opportunities for success in the 
same line of activities which have engaged his father and his brothers. 
In November, 1915, he was elected mayor by the largest vote ever cast 
for that office. 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 949 

Henry H. Kaps was born at Portsmouth, February 4, 1878, a son of 
Peter and Elizabeth (Evans) Kaps. Reared in Portsmouth, educated 
in the city schools, he learned the trade of bricklayer under his father's 
direction and continued under the elder Kaps in the practical details 
of contracting and building until the latter 's retirement. At that time 
he and his brother James succeeded to the business. They have devel- 
oped a thorough organization and all the mechanical facilities for carry- 
ing out successful contracts in general building work, and particularly 
in the construction of brick and reinforced concrete buildings. A large 
part of their business is also in the construction of roads, bridges, sew- 
ers, sidewalks and other public work. 

Henry H. Kaps was first married in 1906 Vo Frances ^Merrill. She 
was born in Wheelersburg, a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Pixley) 
Merrill. Mrs. Kaps died in 1910, leaving a daughter named Elizabeth. 
The present Mrs. Kaps was, before her marriage, Mrs. Carrie (Beatty) 
Belmart, the widow of Simeon Belmart. Her parents were Alexander 
and Mary (Skelton) Beatty. ISlr. Kaps is a member of the Episcopal 
Church. 

Charles Vincent Wertz. Noteworthy among the enterprising and 
prosperous residents of Portsmouth is Charles Vincent Wertz, who is 
carrying on a substantial business as a dealer in real estate. A son of 
Charles Wertz, he was born April 27, 1872, in the City of Portsmouth, 
coming from German ancestry. 

A native of Germany, Charles Wertz was left fatherless when a 
young child. His widowed mother being left in somewhat straightened 
circumstances, came with her little family to America, locating in Ports- 
mouth, where she subsequently married Jacob Kunzelman, with whom 
she removed to Beaver, Pike County, where they both spent their re- 
maining days. Charles Wertz became self-supporting at an early age, 
working at any honest employment until entering a printing office, 
where, in addition to learning the printers' trade, he accpired a very 
good education. He was afterwards clerk on a steamer plying between 
Cincinnati and New Orleans for a number of seasons. Resigning that 
position, he opened a cafe in Portsmouth, and thereafter conducted it 
successfully until his death, in 1897, at the age of fifty years. The 
maiden name of the wife of Charles Wertz was Elizabeth Barr. A 
daughter of William Barr, she was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, of Ger- 
man lineage. Her paternal grandfather, Thomas Barr, was born, 
reared, and married in Germany. Late in life he bade adieu to the 
fatherland, came to Ohio, and spent his last days in Chillicothe. Born 
and educated in Germany, William Barr was fourteen years of age 



950 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

when he came to America. Locating in Pike County, Ohio, he was for 
a while employed in the stone works at Waverly, and subsequently lived 
for two or three years in Iowa, and for two years in Portsmouth. He 
died, at the early age of forty-eight years, in Waverly, Ohio. The 
maiden name of the wife of William Barr was Phebe Rodenmeyer. 
Born and bred in Germany, she came to this country at the age of 
twenty-two years, and until her marriage kept house for her uncle, Val- 
entine Frey, near Waverly. She died in Portsmouth, at the age of 
forty-seven years, leaving four children, as follows: Katherine; Fred- 
erick ; Elizabeth, who married Charles Wertz ; and Charles. Mrs. Eliza- 
beth Wertz died March 9, 1815. She had two children, namely: 
Charles Vincent, the special subject of this brief biographical sketch; 
and Laura, who married John Wilhelm, and has one child, Harold 
Wilhelm. Both parents belonged to tl^e German Evangelical Church, 
and the father was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 

Having obtained a practical common school education, Charles Vin- 
cent Wertz began his career as a clerk in a mercantile establishment. 
Not content, however, with his position and future prospects in that 
capacity, he finally turned his attention to the real estate business, and 
in his various transactions has met with most satisfactory results. He 
makes a specialty of buying extensive acreage, and after platting his 
property, builds upon it, and sells at a fair profit. In this way Mr. 
Wertz has built up a large and lucrative business, and has done much 
to promote the growth and prosperity of city and county. 

On September 15, 1897, Mr. Wertz was united in marriage with 
Clara Slagle, who was born at Powellsville, Ohio, a daughter of Dr. 
Jacob and Katherine Slagle. ]\Ir. and Mrs. Wertz are the parents of 
three children, namely : Margaret, Charles, and William. Fraternally, 
Mr. Wertz is a member of ^Magnolia Lodge, No. 390, Knights of Pythias. 

Oscar R. Micklethwait, M.D. Occupying a place of prominence 
among the younger and successful physicians and surgeons of Scioto 
County, Oscar R. ^licklethwait, M. D., has an extensive and lucrative 
practice in Portsmouth, and is fast winning for himself an honored 
name in medical circles. He was born on the old ^lartin Funk home- 
stead, which was likewise the birthplace of his father, William R. 
Micklethwait. 

His paternal grandfather, Joseph ^licklethwait, was born near 
Snaith, in Yorkshire, England, where his parents were lifelong resi- 
dents. Having served an apprenticeship to the blacksmith's trade in 
Yorkshire, he came to America in early manhood, settling in Ports- 
mouth, Ohio, where he followed his trade for a time. After his mar- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 951 

riage he settled on a farm belonging to his father-in-law, Martin Funk, 
and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death, in 1848, 
at the early age of forty-two years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Barbara Funk, was born at Oldtown, Scioto County, Ohio, in 1801. 
Her father, Martin Funk, was born in 1761, in Stephenson, Frederick 
County, Virginia, and was but an infant when his parents settled in 
Hagerstown, Maryland, and a lad of nine years when they removed to 
Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood. 
Coming to Ohio in 1798, he settled in Scioto County, on land on which, 
according to the history written by Mr. Keyes, he lived for four or five 
years. ]\Ir. Funk then bought from IMr. Massie several hundred acres 
of land lying near Portsmouth, and near a spring of running water 
built a log cabin. The direct road to Chillicothe passed his house, 
which he opened to the traveling public. In 1813 General Meigs issued 
a call for the militia of this section of the state to turn out and repel 
the British, who had invaded Ohio, and surrounded Fort IMeigs. Every 
man on the muster roll of the county was ordered to appear at Martin 
Funk's house, from which they all marched to the scene of battle. Mr. 
Funk subsequently erected a substantial brick house, which is still 
standing, one of the oldest residences in the county. He was very 
prosperous in business, in addition to carrying on general farming suc- 
cessfully, owning and operating a distillery. At his death, which 
occurred October 16, 1838, he left a large estate, which was divided 
among his children. He served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, 
and during the later years of his life drew a pension. 

]\Iartin Funk married Elizabeth Studebaker, who was born in 1772, 
and died in 1822. She belonged to a family of much prominence, being 
closely related to the Studebaker family of Indiana. She was said to 
have been a capable and energetic woman, well versed in all the domes- 
tic arts. 

The birth of William R. Micklethwait occurred on the old Funk 
homestead, July 23, 1843. He was there brought up, and* eventually suc- 
ceeded to its ownership, the farm being now included within the limits of 
the City of Portsmouth. For many years he carried on an extensive and 
highly remunerative business as a market gardener and dairyman, but 
is "now living retired from active pursuits, enjoying a well-earned 
leisure. He married, January 6, 1874, Abigail Dever, who was born 
in Madison Township, Scioto County, a daughter of William Dever and 
granddaughter of Solomon Dever. 

George Dever, the great-grandfather of Abigail Dever, was born, 
reared and married in Virginia. Migrating with his family to Ohio, he 
lived for a few years in vicinity of Sandusky, from there removing ta 



952 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

what is now Jackson County. At that early day the greater part of all 
the land in Ohio was owned by the Government. It was heavily tim- 
bered, and largely inhabited by the wild beasts of the forest and the 
dusky savages. Instead of settling on the rich bottom lands, George 
Dever, fearing malaria, sought the more healthful hilly regions, and 
bought a tract of land in what is now Hamilton Township, Jackson 
County. There clearing a farm from the wilderness, he continued his 
residence until his death. 

Born in Virginia in 1786, Solomon Dever was young when brought 
by his parents to Ohio. He made the best of his offered opportunities 
for acquiring an education, and when ready to start in life on his own 
account bought land in Hamilton Township, and engaged in farming. 
Portsmouth, twenty miles away, was the nearest market, and as the 
roads leading to that city were very poor, for a number of years he had 
to transport his surplus farm produce on pack saddles. A wise man- 
ager and able business man, he acquired several tracts of land in Jack- 
son County, and a number of acres just across the line in Scioto County. 
He was a man of great mental and physical strength, and attained the 
ripe old age of eighty-nine years. His wife, whose maiden name was 
Chloe Mault, died at the age of eighty-eight years. 

William Dever, Doctor Micklethwait's maternal grandfather, was 
born October 20, 1825, on the home farm in Hamilton Township, where 
he grew to manhood, in the meantime obtaining a practical common 
school education, and a good knowledge of agriculture. Subsequently 
settling on a farm in ^Madison Township, he remained there until 1881, 
when he bought property across the line in Jackson County, where lie 
carried on general farming with success until his death, at the age of 
four score and four years. The maiden name of his wife was Louisa 
McDowell. She was born in ^ladison Township, the daughter of a 
pioneer, Samuel I\IcDowell, who there improved a farm, on which he 
resided until after the death of his first wife, Elizabeth (Bennett) 
McDowell. He then moved to Franklin County, where he married a 
second time, and lived until his death. Mr. and ^Irs. William R. Mickle- 
thwait reared four children, namely: "William D.; Joseph T. ; Oscar R., 
the special subject of this sketch; and Louise. 

Acquiring his elementary education in the rural schools, Oscar R. 
Micklethwait was graduated from the Portsmouth High School with 
the class of 1901, and later continued his studies at Adelbert College, 
in Cleveland. Deciding upon a professional career, he then entered 
the Ohio ^Medical College, at Cincinnati, where he was graduated in 
1906, with the degree of ]\I. D. Subsequently spending a year as an 
interne at St. Mary's Hospital, Doctor ilicklethwait began the practice 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 953 

of his chosen profession in Portsmouth. He has been successful from 
the start, and deserves credit for the position he has worj, not only as a 
physician and surgeon, but as one of the most popular and esteemed 
citizens of the place. 

Doctor Mieklethwait married, June 6, 1910, Laura Allard, a daugh- 
ter of Wesley Allard and granddaughter of Thomas Allard. Her great- 
grandfather, Joseph Allard, a native of England, married Mary 
Gardner, and settled near Sheffield, England, where her death occurred 
about 1832. Soon after the death of his young wife, he came to Amer- 
ica, bringing with him his four children, William, Sarah, Lydia and 
Thomas. Locating in IMadison Township, Scioto County, Ohio, he 
cleared a farm, on which he spent his remaining days. Thomas Allard, 
the youngest child of Joseph Allard, was born near Sheffield, England, 
January 27, 1829, and as a young child was brought by his father to 
Scioto County, where he was reared and educated. Locating in Pike 
County about 1855, he bought, in jMarion Township, a tract of land, 
a few acres of which had been cleared, and in the opening a log house 
had been built. He improved the remainder of the land, erected a good 
set of frame buildings, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits 
until his death. The maiden name of the wife of Thomas Allard was 
Harriet A. Brown. She was a daughter of Rev. Royal Brown, a Prot- 
estant Methodist preacher, and granddaughter of Daniel Brown, who 
came from New York State to Ohio in pioneer days, locating in Pike 
County. Rev. Royal Brown married Rachael Beauchamp, a daughter 
of John Beauchamp, who was likewise one of the pioneer settlers of 
Pike County. Wesley Allard, Mrs. Mieklethwait 's father, was born in 
Marion Township and educated in Pike County. He is now a success- 
ful coal operator in Jackson County. The maiden name of the wife of 
Wesley Allard was Sarah Frances Davis. Her father, John Davis, 
Mrs. Mieklethwait 's maternal grandfather, owns and operates a woolen 
mill and a flour mill in Jackson. He married Susan Elizabeth Burns, 
who, like himself, was a native of Virginia, her father having lived 
about tifty miles from Richmond, where he oMTied a large plantation, 
which he operated with slave labor. 

Mrs. Mieklethwait is a woman of talent and culture. She was grad- 
uated from the Jackson High School with the class of 1905, and subse- 
quently attended the Ohio University, at Athens, for three years. The 
Doctor is a member of the county board of pension examiners of Scioto 
County; of the Hempstead Academy of Medicine, which he has served 
as treasurer; and of the Ohio State Medical Association. He is now 
surgeon for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad Company. 



954 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

RoLLEY E. Bennett. It is a substantial tribute to a family when it 
can be said that what one generation has secured and won from the do- 
minion of the wilderness, the next following has continued to improve and 
has increased in value. That is real progress, and the community is 
blessed that has a goodly number of such families. One of this type 
which has been identified with Scioto County since the beginning of 
civilized things is that of Bennett, and there is a large family relation- 
ship of that name in the Hanging Rock Iron Region. RoUey E. Ben- 
nett, of the fourth generation of the family, is one of the most substan- 
tial farmers of Madison Township, and proprietor of the Sugar Grove 
Dairy Farm, comprising 240 acres of well-improved land, situated six- 
teen miles north of Portsmouth. Although Mr. Bennett has been an 
extremely busy man, with large private interests, he has found time 
to devote to the needs of his community, and has well measured up to 
the high standards always associated with the Bennett name in this 
section of the state. 

Rolley E. Bennett was born on the farm that he now occupies, No- 
vember 16, 1856, a son of Thomas J. and Margaret B. (Boiler) Ben- 
nett. Thomas J. Bennett was a son of Thomas and Nancy (Jenkins) 
Bennett. Thomas Bennett, in turn, was a son of Robert Bennett, a 
native of Virginia, who came to Southern Ohio among the pioneers, 
acquired Government land in Scioto County, and spent the rest of his 
days a factor in the early citizenship and a man who extended the 
area of cultivation and improvement. Robert Bennett was the father 
of the following children : Robert, Charles, John, Caleb, Thomas, 
Mamie, Nancy. Thomas Bennett and Nancy Jenkins were the parents 
of the following children : Elizabeth, Margaret, Eleanor, Maria, Caleb, 
Rolley E., Joshua and Thomas J. 

Thomas J. Bennett was born in Madison Township of Scioto County, 
December 31, 1813, that date attesting the extremely early settlement 
of the family in this section. His death occurred after a long and pros- 
perous career on July 9, 1882. Margaret Boiler, his wife, was born in 
Pike County, Ohio, January 8, 1814, and died December 9, 1894. Of 
their eight children four are still living : Nancy B., wife of Rufus Pool 
of Harrison Township ; Thomas J., who married Mary A. Adams and 
lives in Jefferson Township; Anna, wife of Joshua Smart, of Mitchell, 
South Dakota; and Rolley E. Bennett. The deceased children in this 
family are : Matilda ; Martha E. ; Malinda, who married a Mr. Jen- 
kins; Mary, who died near Salem, Oregon, in 1882; and Joseph, who 
died at Beaver, in Pike County, Ohio, October 24, 1910. 

Rolley E. Bennett was reared on the home farm, acquired a district 
schooling, and since early manhood has been identified with the activi- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 955 

ties of the farm and the management of a first-class dairy. On May 9, 
1880, he married Jessie F. ^loore, who was born in Harrison Township 
of Scioto County, March 9, 1857, and grew up in that vicinity and re- 
ceived her education there. To their marriage have been born nine 
children, eight of whom are living : Agnes, wife of Ira Coriell, of Har- 
rison Township; Chloe, who died in infancy; Gertrude, the wife of 
George Craig, of Jetferson Township, Scioto County; Clarence, who 
married Maggie Stout and lives in ^Madison Township, Scioto County ; 
lea and Iva, twins, the former the wife of Floyd Lemon and the latter 
the wife of William Gampp ; Lillie F., who married Paul E. Cromer, 
of Springfield, Ohio; Nona I., and Emma E., the former of whom is 
engaged in teaching school. 

The family are members of the local Grange, and Mr. Bennett is 
its secretary. In politics a republican, he has done much for his com- 
munity, and has served as assessor of Madison Township and was a 
member of the school board. 

David McKenzie. The owner of Glendale Farm, one of the finely 
improved and valuable landed estates of Scioto County, Mr. McKenzie 
is to be recognized as one of the representative agriculturists and stock- 
growers of the Hanging Rock Iron Region and the beautiful Scioto 
Valley, even as he is known as a sterling citizen of utmost loyalty and 
public spirit. His farm comprises 370 acres and is situated in IMadison 
Township, 5V2 miles east of Lucasville. Further interest attaches to 
his career by reason of the fact that he was born on a portion of the 
farm that is now owned by him and that he is a scion of one of the 
sterling pioneer families of this favored section of the Buckeye State. 

David McKenzie was bom on the old homestead farm in Madison 
Township, Scioto County, on the 21st of September, 1843, and is a son 
of David and Harriet (Mcintosh) McKenzie, both of whom were born 
and reared in Scotland, but the marriage of whom was solemnized in the 
City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from which state they shortly after- 
ward immigrated to Ohio and numbered themselves among the pioneers 
of Scioto County. The old homestead farm was covered with heavy 
timber save for a clearing of two acres when they established their resi- 
dence in Madison Township, but unremitting industry and good man- 
agement soon brought results and the father eventually developed a 
productive farm, both he and his wife here passing the residue of their 
long aad useful lives, which were guided and governed by the highest 
principles, so that theirs was the goodly gift of confidence and esteem 
granted them by all with whom they came in contact, their names 
meriting enduring place on the roll of the sterling pioneers of Scioto 



956 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

County. Of their five children three are now living : Marjorie is the 
wife of John Flowers, of Madison Township ; Daniel, who was a valiant 
soldier in an Ohio regiment in the Civil war and who now resides at 
Cleveland, and David, who is the immediate subject of this review. 

David McKenzie, inheriting the sturdy characteristics of his Scot- 
tish forebears, has been a man of industry, energy and good judgment, 
and has lived an upright and righteous life, so that he has retained at 
all times the high regard of his fellowmen, the while he has achieved 
success that is worthy of the name. He was reared to the sturdy dis- 
cipline of the pioneer farm and was afforded in his youth the advan- 
tages of the common schools of the locality and period, so that he was 
enabled to lay a firm foundation for the admirable superstructure of 
knowledge which represents the results of self-application and appreci- 
ation of the lessons to b^ learned under the wise head-master, experi- 
ence. He has never severed his allegiance to the great fundamental 
industry of agriculture and is now one of its substantial and influential 
representatives in his native county, with a full appreciation of the 
duties and responsibilities of citizenship and an earnest desire to con- 
tribute to the extent of his ability in the promotion of measures and 
enterprises tending to advance the general welfare of the community. 
He is a republican in his political proclivities, but has had no desire 
for the honors or emoluments of public office. 

On the 24th of October, 1873, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
McKenzie to Miss Mary E. Rice, and of their nine children all are 
living except one : Mary is the wife of Edward Brown ; Harriet is the 
wife of Charles Ault; Cora is the wife of Harlan Brown; Jessie is the 
widow of Clay Shearer ; Jennie is the wife of Joseph Zaler ; Albert is 
a farmer of Harrison Township, Scioto County; Earl, who married 
Miss Margaret Fullerton, is engaged in farming in Madison Township ; 
Clarence, who wedded Miss Julia Kallner, is a farmer of Jefferson 
Township ; and Ray remains at the parental home. 

Charles Steahley. Material prosperity has long been in the posses- 
sion of Mr. Steahley, who is a farmer and respected citizen of Clay 
Township in Scioto County. Mr. Steahley has earned all that he has ever 
acquired, and few men have performed a more skillful and industrious 
part in the life and activities of Clay Township during the last forty or 
fifty years than this citizen. His farm and all its surroundings indicate 
the thrifty and efficient character of the proprietor. Mr. Steahley started 
out with very little more than the average young man of his time has on 
arriving at manhood, and all his accumulations represent his industry 
and honorable dealings. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 957 

Charles Steahley was born in Baden, Germany, May 6, 1842. His 
father died in Germany, and the widow with her four sons came to the 
United States, and after living a time in Pennsylvania, moved to Southern 
Ohio and bought the land where Charles Steahley now has his home. Mr. 
Steahley was educated in the schools of America, and early in life took 
up the struggle for existence. He is the owner of 160 acres of well 
improved land, and among his fellow citizens is regarded as a farmer who 
knows his business and has succeeded as a result of close application to 
his work. 

Mr. Steahley married Caroline Lenhardt. They are the parents of 
five living children : Charles Steahley ; Lizzie, the wife of John Sheppard ; 
Mary, who married Edward Kennedy ; Clara and Anna, both unmarried 
and living at home. The family- are members of the Catholic Church at 
Portsmouth. Mr. Steahley is a democrat in politics. 

Patrick B. Henry has had an active career, one in which he has 
accumulated prosperity for himself, and at the same time has been able 
to help others, and used his influence as a quiet but useful citizen to 
promote the community welfare. Mr. Henry is now a retired farmer 
living at Lucasville, but many years of his active life were spent at 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Patrick B. Henry was born at Duck's Run in Scioto County, July 6, 
1866, a son of Frank and IMaria (Morgan) Henry. His father was a 
native of New Jersey and his mother of Ohio. The maternal grand- 
father served as an officer during the Mexican war, enlisting from 
Morgantown, Virginia, and he was a general in the army. He was also 
one of the founders of Portsmouth, and was one of the earliest settlers 
in the Scioto Vallej^, Morgan Township having been named in his honor. 
Patrick B. Henry has the following . brothers and sisters: Rachel, wife 
of James Jordan; Thomas, who is a carpenter in Scioto County; John, 
a butcher in Scioto County; and Frank, of Wellsburg, West Virginia. 

When Patrick B. Henry was about fifteen months of age his parents 
died, and he was then taken into the home of a benevolent aunt, Rachel 
Jones, who gave him a liberal education and reared him to manhood, 
so that he started in life well equipped for its serious duties. ]\Ir. 
Henry lived for about nineteen years in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and 
during that time was engaged in the produce business, and in that way 
got his start toward a successful career. 

In 1892 Mr. Henry married Anna G. IMonaghan, of Pittsburgh, 
where she was born and educated. In December, 1898, ^Ir. and Mrs. 
Henry returned to Scioto County, Ohio, and since that time his inter- 
ests have been largely along agricultural lines. The immediate cause 



958 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

of his return to Scioto County was to look after his aunt's property 
and also her own welfare. He owed much to her for his early training, 
and gave her a good home and the consideration of a son during her 
declining years. She died January 29, 1914. 

In politics Mr. Henry is a republican, and has taken quite an active 
part in local affairs. He is the owner of 300 acres of fine land in Valley 
Township of Scioto County. 

Henry Knore. One of the best improved farms in Scioto County 
is the Knore estate in Harrison Township. It is the home of progressive 
German-American citizenship, where Henry Knore has lived and given 
his energies to its development and improvement during the forty or 
fifty years of his active life. For what he has accomplished as a farmer, 
and also for his influence in citizenship and as a helpful factor in 
community affairs, Henry Knore has the respect and esteem of the 
entire community. His estate is known as the Maple Grove Farm, 
comprising 330 acres of land situate five miles north of Sciotoville on 
the Harrisonville Pike. 

Henry Knore, though most of his life has been spent in America, 
was born in Germany, February 22, 1851, son of Christian and Anna M. 
(Miller) Knore. The parents were bom, reared, educated and mar- 
ried in Germany, and not long after the birth of Henry Knore set out 
for the United States, arriving in Scioto County and locating on the 
farm now owned by Henry on May 2, 1853. That continued to be their 
place of residence until both parents passed away, after long and worthy 
lives. Only two of their children are still living, and Mr. Knore 's sis- 
ter is Caroline, wife of William Turner, whose home is near Wait Sta- 
tion in Scioto County. 

Henry Knore was about two years of age when he came to the 
United States with his parents, grew up on the old homestead, and 
while attending district school in the winter months, was trained to 
all the emergencies and responsibilities of farm life. He knows farm- 
ing both in its practical and theoretical phases, and is one of the men 
who have made -more than an ordinary success of that industry in 
Scioto County. 

Mr. Knore first married Nevada B. Wait, who died eight months 
after their marriage. He then married Anna A. Henneman, who was 
born in Pennsylvania and came to Jackson County, Ohio. Her father 
was a Lutheran minister. Mr. and Mrs. Knore have nine children 
still living: Charles, a farmer in Harrison Township; Sarah, wife of 
Clarence Schomberg; Frank, who married Stella Schomberg; Anna, 
wife of Charles Snodgrass; Willie, who married Ida Frowine; Lena, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 959 

wife of George Schope ; Lewis, who married Abbie Bennett ; Ella, who 
is married to William Wicks ; Henry, unmarried and a resident of 
Athens, Ohio. The family are members of the Lutheran Church, and 
Mr. Knore is affiliated with the Knights of Pythias lodge at Harrison- 
ville, and is a member and treasurer of both the Sunshine and Pomona 
Granges. In politics a democrat, he has been honored by his" Township 
of Harrison with election to the office of township treasurer. 

Mitchell Evans. At the time of his death, which occurred on the 
13th of March, 1908, at his fine farm homestead in Nile Township, Mr. 
Evans was one of the most venerable and honored pioneer citizens of 
Scioto County, within whose borders he had resided for more than 
seventy years, he having been a lad of twelve years when he came with 
his widowed mother from Kentucky to this county. His life was one 
of industry and well directed endeavor and he was long numbered 
among the representative farmers of the county, the while his course 
was guided by lofty principles of integrity and with a high sense of 
personal stewardship, so that be merited and held the inviolable con- 
fidence and esteem of his fellowmen. He witnessed the development 
and upbuilding of Scioto County from the stage of pioneer conditions 
to twentieth century opulence and prosperity, and contributed his quota 
to the civic and material progress of this favored section of the Buckeye 
State, his character and achievement having been such as to make most 
consistent the according in this volume of a definite tribute to his 
memory. 

Mitchell Evans was born in Bracken County, Kentucky, on the 29th 
of October, 1820, and was a son of Abram and Esther (Turner) 
Evans, the patronymic indicating that the genealogy may be traced 
back to Welsh origin, though the family was founded in America in 
the early colonial days. The parents of Mr. Evans were born on Deal's 
Island, in Chesapeake Bay, Somerset County, Maryland, and his grand- 
father, Solomon Evans, was largely interested in the fisheries for which 
that island has been noted for many years, especially in the propaga- 
tion of oysters. Solomon Evans was likewise a farmer ori this beautiful 
little island, and, so far as available data indicate, it is virtually assured 
that his entire life was passed on Deal's Island. Abram Evans was 
reared and educated in Maryland, where his marriage was solemnized. 
Esther Turner, though still quite young at the time of her marriage to 
Abram Evans, was a widow with one child, a daughter named Nancy, 
whom they brought to Kentucky. The name of her first husband was 
Revelle. Finally IMr. Evans immigrated with his family to Kentucky 
and became one of the pioneer settlers of Bracken County, that state. 



960 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

where his death occurred only a few years later. About the year 1832 
his widow came with her children to Scioto County, Ohio, where she 
passed the remainder of her life and where she reared her three sons 
and four daughters, the names of the sons having been John, Solomon 
and Mitchell. 

As previously stated, Mitchell Evans was about twelve years old at 
the time of the family removal to Scioto County, and it is supposed that 
he attended the pioneer schools for some time, though his broader edu- 
cation was acquired under the preceptorship of that wisest of all head- 
masters. Experience, and he became a man of broad information and 
mature judgment. As a youth he became identified with navigation 
interests on the Ohio River and after learning thoroughly the course of 
this stream, he found employment as a pilot on one of the large steam- 
boats. Later he became a successful representative of the lumber busi- 
ness in this section of the state, as a dealer in tan bark, which he 
"boated" to Cincinnati, Louisville, and ]\Iadison, Indiana. 

In 1863 Mr. Evans, whose industry and economy had enabled him 
to accumulate an appreciable capital, made a judicious investment in a 
tract of land in the Ohio River bottoms, in Nile Township and about 
six miles below Portsmouth. Here he developed one of the splendid 
farms of Scioto County, making the best of improvements on the place 
and continuing his residence here until the close of his long and useful 
life. He was nearly eighty-eight years of age at the time of his death, 
and was revered in the community as one of the sterling citizens and 
representative pioneers of Scioto County, where his name and memory 
shall be held in lasting honor. He won success and prosperity by well- 
ordered effort, was leal and loyal in all of the relations of life, and his 
circle of friends was coincident with that of his acquaintances. Lib- 
eral and public-spirited, but never a seeker of official preferment, he 
accorded staunch allegiance to the republican party, and he was for 
many years one of the most valued and influential members of the Metho- 
dist Episcopal Church in the little Village of Friendship. He served as 
class leader and steward of this church, of which his widow likewise is 
a devoted member; she still resides on the beautiful old homestead farm 
and is a loved figure in the social life of the community, her home being 
known for its gracious hospitality. Mrs. Evans is active in church 
work, in which connection she is a member of the AVoman's Foreign 
Missionary Society, and as a descendant from sterling revolutionary 
stock she is a member of the Joseph Spencer Chapter of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, in the City of Portsmouth. 

Mr. Evans was twice married. The maiden name of his first wife 
was Maria Bradford, and she was survived by three children: Charles, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 961 

Emory and Maria. Charles and Maria are deceased, but Emory owns 
a farm near Portsmouth on which he resides. On the 7th of May, 1868, 
was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Evans to ]\Iiss Rachel Ellen Mur- 
phy, who was born in Green Township, Adams County, Ohio, and who 
is a daughter of David W. and Cynthia Ann (McCall) Murphy, both 
representatives of well-known and highly honored pioneer families of 
this part of the Buckeye State. David W. Murphy was born in New 
Jersey, and his father. Recompense ]\Iurphy, was born near Daretown, 
Salem County, that state, a son of William Murphy, who likewise was 
a native of New Jersey, and whose father was born in England and 
became the founder of the American branch of the family. As a young 
man this sturdy progenitor came to America on a sailing vessel of the 
type common to that early period, and just before landing in the New 
World he married a young woman who had been likewise a passenger 
on the vessel, the chaplain of w^hich performed the nuptial ceremony on 
shipboard. The young couple established their residence in New Jersey, 
and lived for a number of years. William Murphy, the great-grand- 
father of Mrs. Evans, and the first child of this union, was reared to 
manhood in New Jersey and represented that colony as a valiant sol- 
dier of the Continental line in the war of the Revolution. When well 
advanced in years he came to the West to live with his son Samuel, 
who was a pioneer of Indiana, and in whose home, situated near the 
dividing line between that state and Ohio, the venerable father passed 
the residue of his life, as did also his wife, whose maiden name was 
Phoebe Sherry, the remains of both being interred in the old Bath 
cemetery, seven miles distant from Oxford, Butler County, Ohio. Wil- 
liam and Phoebe (Sherry) Murphy became the parents of six children, 
namely : John, William, Recompense, Samuel, Mary and Rachel. John 
passed his entire life in New Jersey and all of the other children came 
to the West. ]\Iary became the wife of David Swing, of Cincinnati, and 
they were the grandparents of Rev. David Swing, who became one of 
the most distinguished clergymen and orators of the West, with resi- 
dence in the City of Chicago, and who attained to national reputation. 
Rachel wedded David Ogden, who became a prominent and influential 
citizen of Cincinnati. 

Recompense ^Murphy, grandfather of Mrs. Evans, was reared and 
educated in New Jersey, and there, in 1799, was solemnized his mar- 
riage to IMiss Catherine Newkirk, a member of a prominent old family 
of that state. In 1805 they came to Ohio, about three years after the 
admission of the state to the Union, and they were accompanied by their 
two children. The long and weary journey was made hy stage and 
canal to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, from which place they came down 



962 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

the Ohio River by boat to the mouth of Turkey Creek, in the newly cre- 
ated County of Scioto, there having been several other colonists in the 
party. Near the landing these sturdy pioneers fotind a small clearing 
in the midst of the forest wilds, and on the same they planted corn, to 
provide for future necessities. Recompense IMurphy then set forth in 
search of an eligible location, and he finally purchased 320 acres of land 
in the locality known as Sandy Springs, in Adams County, paying for 
this property $1,000 in gold. With all of energy and fortitude he set 
himself vigorously to the clearing and reclaiming of his land and to 
placing the same under effective cultivation. Prosperity attended his 
indefatigable labors and in the course of time he erected a substantia^l 
brick house on his farm, the same having been picturesquely situated 
on the banks of the Ohio River and having continued to be his place 
of abode until his death, in 1844, at the age of seventy years. His first 
wife died in 1830, leaving eleven children, namely: David Whittaker, 
Jacob N., William, Recompense Sherry, Rachel, Mary Ann, Rebecca, 
Samuel, Catherine, John and Robert, the last named having died at the 
age of seventeen years, and all of the others having married and reared 
children. 

David Whittaker Murphy, father of ]\Irs. Evans, was one of the 
two children born in New Jersey and was a child at the time of the 
family removal to Ohio, where he was reared to manhood under the 
conditions and influences of the pioneer farm, in Adams County. Until 
1848 he was a farmer, residing in Adams County, Ohio. In that year 
he left Adams County, removing to Buena Vista, just over the line of 
Adams County, in Scioto County, where he kept hotel for a while. He 
was postmaster at Buena Vista from 1862 until 1873. After the death 
of his second wife, in 1873, he made his home with his daughter 
Rachel Ellen, widow of him to whom this memoir is dedicated. He 
passed to the life eternal in 1891, at the patriarchal age of ninety 
years, and was at the time one of the most venerable pioneer citizens 
of Southern Ohio. jMrs. Cynthia Ann (IMcCall) Murphy, mother of 
Mrs. Evans, was born in Nile Township, Scioto County, in 1816, a 
daughter of William and Delilah MeCall, sterling pioneers of this 
county. INIrs. ]\Iurphy passed to the "land of the leal" in 1873, and 
was survived by five children: David, Rachel Ellen, Leonidas H., John 
and Matilda. 

In conclusion is entered brief record concerning the children of 
Mr. and Mrs. Evans. Ernest, who is superintendent of furnaces of the 
Hitchcock & Andrews Company, extensive iron-furnace operators at 
Youngstown, this state, married IMiss Elizabeth Linn, and they have 
two children : Linn and James. William, who resides on a farm near 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 963 

Powell.sville, Ohio, wedded Miss ]Mary E. Nelson, and they have four 
chiklrcn : Helen, Anna L., Charles and Robert. Anna, the youngest 
of llie cliildren of Mrs. Evans, is the wife of Harley E. Marconnet, a 
trusted salesman of the MeDonald-Kiley Shoe Company of Cincinnati, 
Ohio. They reside at Portsmouth, Ohio. 

James R. Hii.ijng, ]\I. D. In designating in this publication those 
wlio stand as al)le and honored representatives of the medical profes- 
sion in Scioto County, special reference may well be made to Doctor 
IliUiiig, who is engaged in practice with residence and headquarters 
in the Village of Lucasville and whose character and admirable serv- 
ices have given him inviolable place in popular esteem. 

Doctor Hilling was born in Adams County, Ohio, on the 23d of 
October, 187.S, and is a son of Albertus W. and Nancy M. (McClelland) 
Hilling, the former of whom still resides in Adams County and the 
latter of whojn passed to the life eternal on the 28th of May, 1911. Of 
the five children four are living: Nora E. was a successful teacher 
in the public schools prior to her marriage and is now the wife of 
Casey V. Clark, residing near Ripley, Brown County; Sarah E. is the 
wife of John C. McGovney, residing near West Union, the judicial cen- 
ter of Adams County; Albert E. is deputy county treasurer of Adam.s 
County: and of the five children the doctor was tlie third in order of 
birth. 

After availing himself of the advantages of the district schools of 
his native county Doctor Hilling completed a course in the National 
Nornud Scliool, at Ada, this state. He then engaged in teaching, to 
whicli he devoted his attention for a period of three years, proving 
a popular and efificient representative of the pedagogic profession, 
though lie had in the meanwhile formulated definite plans for his 
future career and determined to prepare himself for the vocation in 
wliidi he has achieved definite success and prestige, as the only regis- 
t<'i-e(l physician and surgeon residing in Lucasville. In pursuance of 
his ambition he entered the Hospital ^Medical College of Kentucky, 
in the (.ity of Louisville, and after his graduation, with the degree 
of Do(;tor of ^Medicine, he was engaged in practice in Kentucky for 
eighteen month.s. at the expiration of which, in July, 1907, he returned 
to Ohio, w'here he has since been engaged in successful practice, his 
liome having been establislied at Lucasville in October, 1911. He was 
formcily engaged in practice at Piketon, and while there became a 
member of the Pike County ]\Iedieal Society, with which he is still 
identified, as is he also with the Scioto County INIedical Society and 
the Ohio State ^ledical Societv. The doctor continues a close and 



964 HANGING EOCK IRON REGION 

appreciative studenj: of the best standard and periodical literature of 
his profession, keeps in touch with the advances made in both medical 
and surgical science and his substantial and representative practice 
indicates alike his ability and his personal popularity. He is genial 
and unassuming, earnest in his devotion to his humane and exacting 
profession, and progressive and loyal in his civic attitude. 

On June 23, 1909, Doctor Hilling wedded Miss Estella Violet, daugh- 
ter of Martin Violet, a sterling citizen of Pike County, she having 
been for twelve years a popular teacher in the public schools — the 
greater part of the time in the thriving little City of London, Madison 
County. Doctor and Mrs. Hilling are popular factors in the social life 
of their home community and they have two winsome little daughters, 
Marian V. and Virginia G. 

Dr. James N. Thomas. For a number of years Dr. J. N. Thomas 
practiced medicine with all the success of the able and thoroughly 
trained physician and surgeon, but in Valley Township of Scioto County, 
the community where he was born and reared. Doctor Thomas 
is best known as a farmer and stock breeder, and his reputation as the 
proprietor and manager of the Thomas Farms is one that has extended 
pretty well over the state. Doctor Thomas has demonstrated that his 
peculiar fitness is the development of better farming, and through this 
avenue has done his greatest service not only to himself but to society. 
He is an expert in the breeding and feeding of pure bred swine, and his 
herd of Big Bone Poland Chinas is probably the finest in Southeastern 
Ohio. 

He was born at Lucasville, Ohio, March 4, 1864, the eldest son of Wil- 
liam J. and Mary M. (Warwick) Thomas, his father being a life 
resident of the community. Reared in this village he received his edu- 
cation in the common school of the place. From 1881 he was associated 
in business with Joseph H. Brant until 1887, when he entered the Miami 
Medical College as a student, graduating in the spring of 1891, and 
immediately began the practice of medicine at Del-Norte, Colorado. 
Here on April 9, 1893, he was married to Mary E. ^Miller also of Scioto 
County. 

From 1893 to 1909 Doctor Thomas was closely identified with the 
medical profession of Denver, Colorado. In 1897 he did post-graduate 
work in the medical schools of New York, and on his return 
to Denver, identified himself with the clinical staff of the Gross 
Medical College, and was soon appointed to assistant to the 
chair of surgery. A year later he became medical director of The 
Western Life and Accident Insurance Company. Enjoying these duties 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 965 

as well as a large and inereasiug practice, failing health in 1909 coui- 
pelled him to retire from his medical work and to retnrn to the old 
community in which he spent his boyhood. 

Residing in a modern farm home one mile north of Lucasvillc, he is 
a successful farmer and stockman and few who have devoted all tlicir 
years and energies to the vocation have attained such success. 

Doctor Thomas is affiliated with Lucasville Lodge No. 485, Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons, being one of its past masters, and an active 
member of the Scioto Count}- Agriculture Association. In politics 
lie is republican. 

Ben-iamin F. Gentry. Holding the position of station agent for 
the Norfolk & Western Railroad at Lucasville, Scioto County, Mr. Gen- 
try is a M'ell known and popular citizen of this section of the state 
and claims as the place of his nativity the historic Old Dominion com- 
monwealth. He was born in Nelson County, Virginia, on the 25th of 
April, 1867, and is a sou of Benjamin B. and Nancy E. (Dodd) Gen- 
try, both of whom were l)orn and reared in Virginia, where they passed 
their entire lives, the' father having been for many years a prosperous 
representative of the agricultural industry in Nelsmi County, where 
both he and his wufe commanded unqualified popular esteem. Of their 
nine children seven are living and the .sub.ject of this review is the 
only representative of the family in Ohio. 

Benjamin P\ Gentrj- is indebted to the schools of his native state 
for his early educational discipline and upon severing the ties that 
bound him to home and native heath he came to Ohio and entered the 
employ of the Brush Electric Light Companj-, in the City of Cin- 
cinnati, where he remained for the greater part of the years 1885 and 
1886. He then returned to Virginia, where he was again identified 
with agi'icultural pursuits, for one year, and he then became a brake- 
nian on the line of the Norfolk & Western Railroad. AVhile serving 
in this capacity he met with an accident that entailed the loss of his 
right arm, and the railroad company gave him the position of pumper 
after he had recuperated from his injury. He has since continued in the 
service of the company, with the telegraph department of which he has 
been identified since 1901. On the 8th of September, 1908, he was ma<le 
the company station agent and telegraph operator at Lucasville, Ohio, 
where he has since continued to accord efficient service and where he 
lias gained unqualified popular esteem. 

In politics Mr. Gentry is a staunch supporter of the cause of the 
repui)lican party and while he has never sought public office he stn'ved 
as president of the lioard of education while residing at Pi'itchard, 



966 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

AViiyiie County, AVest Virginia. He is affiliated with the lodge of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows in the City of Portsmouth, 
judicial center of Scioto County, and with the Order of Railway Teleg- 
rM pliers. 

On the 8th of March, 1888, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Gentry to ^liss Anna Hughes, of Nelson County, Virginia, and con- 
cerning their children the following brief record is given : Miss Minnie, 
Avho is serving as telegraph operator for the Norfolk & Western Rail- 
road at Pritehard, West Virginia ; Benjamin H. is employed as a tele- 
graph operator for the same company, in the City of Columbus, Ohio; 
Dora is identified with the business interests in Lucasville ; and John 
and Beulah remaiii at liome and are attending the public schools. At 
Lucasville ^Ir. Gentry- own.s his attractive residence, besides a number 
of vacant village lots. 

E. W. Pi'KDY. One of the conspicuous business enterprises of the 
Town of Lucasville in Scioto County is Purdy Brothers Milling Com- 
pany, operating a custom flour and feed mill, with an average product 
of seventy-five liarrels per day of high grade flour, made from local 
grain. Mr. E. W. Purdy has .spent all his life in Scioto County, is an 
experienced miller, and a citizen of substantial influence in the com- 
munity. 

E. W. Purdy was born in this county May 23, 1867, a son of W. M. 
and June (Bennett) Purdy. Both parents still live in Lucasville. Mr. 
Purdy was reared in ]Madison Township on a farm, was educated in 
tlie public schools, and early in his career began the operation of a 
threshing outfit and also did .saw milling. From that line of enter- 
prise he finally engaged in business at Lucasville as a flour miller under 
the name of Purdy Brothers. 

^Ir. Purdy has been twice married, and his second wife was Miss 
Sadie Crull. He has a daughter by the first marriage, Mamie, now 
fifteen years of age. ]\Ir. Purdy Ls affiliated with Lucasville Lodge 
No. 465, Ancient Fcee and Accepted Masons, and is a republican in 
politics. 

•loiix 11. Rockwell. He whose name initiates this paragraph is 
one of tlie progres.sive representatives of the agricultural industry in 
his native county and is a young man whose personal popularity gives 
effective voucher for his sterling characteristics and genial nature. II is 
homestead farm is eligibly situated in Valley Township, comprises 303 
acres, and is 1 ' - miles north of Lucasville, one of the attractive vil- 
lages of Scioto County. The farm is on IIk^ excellent turnpike road 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 967 

between Portsmouth and Columbus, and in addition to giving his atten- 
tion to diversified agriculture, Mr. Rockwell is known as one of the 
leading stock growers of his county, where he makes a specialty of the 
breeding of double standard Polled Durham cattle, wath the registered 
head of his herd known as Clearview Lad, No. 8126; of registered 
Poland China swine; and of Shropshire sheep. He is an exemplar of 
the most approved modern methods and policies in the carrying for- 
ward of all departments of his farm industry and is one of the pro- 
gressive and piiblic-spirited citizens of the county that has ever been 
his home. 

John II. Rockwell was born in Clay Township. Scioto County, on 
the 20th of February, 1880, and is a scion of honored pioneer families 
of this favored section of the Buckeye State, his paternal grandfather, 
Charles Rockwell, having been one of the valiant soldiers representing 
this county in the Union ranks during virtually the entire period 
of the Civil war, in which he served four years, as a member of an Ohio 
regiment of volunteers. Mr. Rockwell is a son of Joseph and Mary 
(Field) Rockwell, both of whom are deceased. The former died in 
November 1908, and his wife in 1913. The father had been for many 
years a representative farmer and influential citizen of Valley Town- 
ship, his birth having occurred in this coimty. Of tlie eight children 
all are living except one : Charles is a prosperous farmer of Valley 
Township; Eli is identified with agricultural pursuits at Guthrie, Okla- 
homa; Leroy is likewise a prosperous farmer of Valley Township; 
Nancy E. is deceased ; Bertha is the wife of Albert S. Moulton of Valley 
Township : John H. was the next in order of birth ; Miss ^lary B. 
remains at the parental home; and Ethel L. is the wife of Peter Sned- 
aker, of Rush Township. 

John H. Rockwell was a lad of about eight years at the time of 
the family removal from Rush Township to Valley Township, in which 
latter he continued his studies in the public scliooLs until he had com- 
pleted the curriculum of the high school. He has ])een identified with 
farming and stock-raising from his boyhood days and his familiarity 
with all practical details of these important industries has been rein- 
forced by careful stiidy and investigation, .so that he brings to bear 
in his independent operations the best scientific methods and most mod- 
ern facilities. Not only in his personal enterprises but also as a citizen 
is Ml'. Rockwell essentially progressive, and he has been an active factor 
in the furtherance of the cause of the republican party. He has served 
four years as trustee of Valley Township and has done all in his power 
to further those objects that make for the general good of the community. 
He is affiliated with Lucasville Lodge, No. 465, Free & Accepted INIasons, 



968 HAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

and ill tlic City of l*ort.smouth liolds uuMubership in the Junior Order 
of United American ^leelianics. 

Tlie 26tli day of lAEareli, 1902, recorded the marriage of Mr. Rock- 
well to Miss TiOnisa Simpson, and they had four children, whose names 
and respective years of birth are here noted : Donald S., 1903 ; Raymond 
II., 1906 ; Janet Elinor, 1908 and who died January 11, 1914 ; and I\Iary 
]\r., 1912. Mvs. Rockwell died February 27, 1914. 

Daxikl II. Egcekt. Not only by reason of his secure status as one 
of the representative farmers of Scioto County, but also on account of 
his progressiveness and public spirit as a citizen is Mr. i]gbert entitled 
to recognition in this "History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region." That 
he has impregnable vantage gi'ound in popular coiifidence and esteem 
is shown conclusively in the fact that he has served in various public 
otifices in Valley Towjiship and that he is the only representative of the 
democratic party. ever elected from that township as a member of the 
board of county commissioners, a responsible office to which he was 
re-elected in the autumn of 1914. 

-Mr. Egbert was born at Center Furnace, Lawrence County, Ohio, 
on the 20th of ^fay, 1854, and thus is a native of the region to whose 
history this publication is devoted. He is a son of Daniel and Louise 
(Appel) Egbert, the former of whom was born in the Kingdom of 
Hanover, Germany, on the 8th of ^lay, 1824, and the latter in the Grand 
Duchy of Baden, Germany, on the 25th of March, 1831, she having 
accompanied her parents on their immigration to the United States, in 
1849, and her marriage to Daniel Egbert having been solemnized in 
Lawrence County, Ohio, on the 26th of October of the same year, her 
liusband having established his residence in that county on ihe 1st of 
November, 1847, soon after he came from his native land to America. 
In October, 1858, Daniel Egbert removed with his family from Law- 
rence County to Valley Township, Scioto County, where he became a 
successful farmer and highly esteemed citizen and where he passed the 
I'esidue of his life, his wife surviving him by a number of years and 
having beeji summoned to the life eternal in April, 190L Hoth were 
zealous and consistent members of the Lutheran Churcli. 

Daniel H. Egbert, of this review, was a child of about four years 
at the time of the family removal from Lawrence County to Valley 
Township, Scioto County, Avhich has represented his liome for nearly 
liaif a century and in which he was reared to maturity under the 
discipline of the home farm, in the meanwhile profiting tluly by the 
advantages afforded in the public schools. He has never severed his 
alh'giaiicc to tile l)asic industry of agriculture and is now the owner 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 969 

of one of the fine farms of Valley Township, besides standing as 
one of the progressive representatives of this important line of industry 
in S('ioto County. 

Mr. Egbert has held unswervingly to the cause of the democratic 
party from the time of attaining to his legal majority and has been 
one of its influential figures in Valley Township. Here he has served 
as township trustee and as a member of the school board, and in 1901 
there came still further evidence of popular appreciation of his 
a))ility and sterling character, in that he was elected representative 
of his township on the board of county commissioners, the first democrat 
over elected to this position in the township, the political strength of 
wliieh has always been in favor of the republican party. The efficiency 
and acceptability of his service in this responsible office was most 
plainly shown by his re-election in the autumn of 1914, for a second 
term of three years. Mr. Egbert is a charter member of the Lucas- 
villc lodge of the Knights of Pythias, and both he and his wife arc 
earnest communicants of the Lutheran Church. 

On the 27th of October, 1880, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Egbert to Miss Mary B. Wooster, daughter of the late John Wooster, 
a substantial citizen of Scioto County. Of the nine children of this 
union six are now living: George, who wedded Miss Lottie Holmes, 
is foreman of the roundhouse of the Norfolk & Western Railroad 
in the City of Portsmouth, judicial center and metropolis of Scioto 
County: John, a bachelor, is a successful farmer of his native county; 
Luella remains at the parental home : Walter is identified with agri- 
cultural pursuits in Valley Township ; Dora is the wife of Wilford 
Johnson, who was born in Johnson County, Kentucky, and educated in 
the University of Kentucky, at Lexington, after which he served, from 
lOOf) to 1910, as a telegraph operator for the Norfolk & Western Rail- 
road, his present position being that of United States storekeeper 
and ganger at Frankfort, Kentucky; and Marion is associated with 
his father in the work and management of the home farm. 

John S. Violette. One of the fine landed estates of the beauti- 
ful Scioto Valley is that owned by Mr. Violette, and the splendid 
domain gives patent evidence of his progressiveness and thrift as a 
farmer and stock-grower. The farm comprises 475 acres, in Valley 
Township, Scioto County, one-fourth of a mile south of Luca^ville, 
and it lies on either side of the Portsmouth and Chillicothe turnpike 
road. The owner of this valuable estate is a representative of a family 
whos<' name has been identified with the civic and industrial activities 
of this section of Ohio for nearlv a centurv and in his own career he 



970 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

has shown marked aggressiveness and enterprise, so that he has assisted 
it) carrying forward the march of development and improvement which 
was instituted in the pioneer days and which lias made this one of tlie 
most attractive and opulent sections of the fine old Buckeye Slate. 
He is one of the representative agriculturists of his native county 
and that he has high place in popular esteem is shown by the fact that 
iji the autumn of 1914 he was nominated as a democratic candidate 
for the position of member of the board of county commissioners of his 
native county, and, while being defeated, he ran away ahead of his 
lieket in his vicinity. 

Mr. Violette was born at Harrisonville, Harrison Township, Hcdoto 
County, Ohio, on the 18th of September, 1871, and is a son of John M. 
and Caroline M. (Dewey) Violette, the former of whom was born in 
Pike County, this state, in June, 1820, and the latter of whom was 
born in Highland County, on the 16th of December, 1824, their mar- 
riage having been solemnized at Harrisonville, Scioto County, on tlie 
25th of March, 1845. The father was long numbered among the sul)- 
stantial citizens of Scioto County, where he owned a valuable farm 
and where he conducted a general store, at Harrisonville, for a number 
of years. He died in August, 1895, and his widow passed to the life 
eternal in March 17, 1902. They are survived by two children, of 
whom the subject of this review is the younger; Caroline L., who is a 
talented musician, is now the wife of Edward E. Samson, a substantial 
farmer of Scioto County, their home being at Harrisonville. 

John S. Violette passed his boyhood and youth on the old home- 
stead farm near Harrisonville and there he early learned the lessons 
of practical industry, the while he continued to attend the public 
schools at Harrisonville during the winter terms until he was about 
twenty years old. Since that time he has given unwavering allegiance 
to the great industry of agriculture, of which he has become one of 
the prominent and influential representatives in his native county, 
his large and well-improved estate being devoted to diversified farm- 
ing and the raising of high-grade live stock, especially horses. 

In politics Mr. Violette is found arrayed as a loyal supporter of 
the cause of the democratic party, and his deep interest in all that 
touches the welfare of his native county is shown by the fact that he 
is serving not only as a member of the school board of Valley Town- 
ship but also as a member of the county board of education. He is a 
trustee of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Lucasville, of which 
both he and his wife are zealous members. 

On the 14th of March, 1895, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Violette to Miss Lizzie D. Coburn, who was born near Harrisonville, 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 971 

Scioto County, December 21, 1870, and who was his schoolmate in the 
pablie schools of Harrisonville. Of the four children the eldest is 
Raymond D., who was born May 30, 1898 ; John C. was born Novem- 
ber 26, 1902; Forrest C, June 13, 1905; and Arlyn E., March 15, 1908. 

Lewis W. Doty. AVhile farming has been his activity and chief 
line of endeavor for a number of years, Mr. Doty was long identified 
with the iron industry, and his father before him was manager of the 
old Ohio Furnace in Scioto County. 

Lewis W. Doty was born at Ohio Furnace in Green Township of 
Scioto County April 2, 1875. His parents were Thomas W. and Julia 
(Shepard) Doty. His mother is still living in Green Township, where 
the father died September 5, 1900, his death occurring as the result 
of an accident while manager of the Ohio Furnace. He was born at 
Clinton Furnace in Scioto County, while she was a native of Lawrence 
County. Four of their seven children are still living : Lewis W. ; 
Oliver P. Doty, Jr., who is at Hanging Rock, Lawrence County; Alfred 
S. Doty of Wheeler, Michigan; and Thomas W. Doty is an engineer 
on C. & O. R. R., and located at Eskdale, "West Virginia. 

Lewis W. Doty was reared at the Ohio Furnace and was educated 
in the common schools. His father had moved to Ohio Furnace at the 
age of eighteen, and was promoted through the different grades of 
service until he became manager of the furnace, and was killed while 
in that office. After the district schools, IMr. Doty attended for two 
years the Northern Ohio Normal University at Ada, and at the age 
of twenty-two became bookkeeper and store manager of the Ohio Fur- 
nace Company. He held that position 4i/^ years and then was at New- 
castle with the same company two years, and was manager of 
the furnace a year and a half. In 1901, having given wp his connec- 
tion with the iron industry, Mr. Doty moved to his present farm. He 
is the owner of 100 acres of fine and fertile valley land, located 2'-^ miles 
northwest of Haverhill. 

Mr. Doty married Elizabeth Weisenbarger MitclicU, who was the 
widow of Wm. W. Mitchell, and they had one son, Ell)ert E. ^litcliell. 
who makes his home M'ith his mother and step-father. Mr. and IMrs. 
Doty have five children: Louise M., Irwin T., Claude A., Oliver A., 
and Julius O. The family are members of the ^Methodist Episi-opal 
Clnirch, and ]Mr. Doty is a republican voter. 

Henry Folsom. One of the fine country homes of Scioto County 
is that owned by Henry Folsom in Green Township, in the French 
Grant. 'Mr. Folsom has been long identified with the farming and 



972 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

stock-raising activities of this section, and his place in latter years has 
become especially known as a stock farm, and some of the finest Here- 
ford cattle, Duroc swine and high-grade horses in Southern Ohio are 
to he found on the Folsom estate. Mr. Folsom owns Lot No. 16 and 
part of No. 15, consisting of 325 acres, and also manages 240 acres 
ad.joining that farm. His place is located seventeen miles up the 
Ohio River from Portsmouth. 

Henry Folsom was born February 10, 1847. on the farm he now 
occupies as his residence. It is known far and wide as the Buckeye 
Farm. His father, the late J. S. Folsom, who was born at Leading 
Creek in 1804 and died in 1883, was a pioneer storekeeper at Junior 
Landing beginning about 1832, and at the same time was one of the 
largest land owners and farmers in Southern Ohio, having about 1,000 
acres of land under crop and used as pasture land for his stock. He 
was one of the strongest and most influential citizens of Scioto County. 
His wife, who was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1812, died in 1890. 
They were the parents of ten children, two of whom died in infancy, 
and five of whom are alive at this time: Melissa F., the wife of Dr. 
James L. Taylor; Albert, of the State of Washington; Minerva, wife 
of E. E. Ewing of Texas: Sarah F., widow of 0. H. Smith of Scioto 
County. 

Henry Folsom was reared on the farm where he now lives, was 
educated in the home township and also took a term of instruction 
ill the Sewickleyville Academy and spent one year in the University 
at Delaware, Ohio. After his education he worked as assistant in the 
management of his father's large property until October 22, 1879. 
Tliat date was the time of his marriage to Effie A. Marshall, a grand- 
daughter of the late J. S. Stowe, and a daughter of A. S. IMarshall. 
Slie was born and reared near ]\Iarietta, Ohio, and has become the 
mother of nine children, seven of whom are still living, as follows : 
James A., a graduate of the Agricultural College at Columbus, Ohio, 
and a farmer.; Anna, a graduate of the Bliss Commercial College at 
Columbus and a stenograplier in that city; Grace, who graduated from 
the township schools and the Portsmouth public schools, spent four 
years as teacher in the high school, and since taking a two j'ears' course 
in the Columbus Training School has been identified with public school 
work in Columbus; IMay, who was educated liberally and is a graduate 
of a school for nurses, is now following lier profession in Columbus; 
Pearl, is now a teacher in the Columbus, Ohio, schools; Nancy, wlio 
rec-cived a course of training similar to her sisters, is now in college at 
Columbus, Oliio: Lucy, is at home and was educated in the home schools. 

In 1880, after his marriage, ^Mr. Folsom located near Ilayport, on 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 973 

a fa I'm of 200 acres, and a year later took the management of a flouring 
mill, owned by his father, at Ironton. In 1882 he moved his family 
to Ironton, and continued in charge of the mills there until 1887. He 
then moved out to the home farm, and has since devoted all his time 
to farm management. Mr. Folsom is a breeder of thoroughbred Here- 
ford cattle and Duroe hogs, and is one of the foremost stock raisers of 
Green Township. His land is estimated at $150 per acre in value. In 
politics i\Ir. Folsom has always affiliated with the republican party, 
and has served his community as school director. 

Aaron Kinney. Coiispicuous among the earlier settlers of Ports- 
mouth, Scioto County; was the late Aaron Kinney, who contributed much 
towards the upbuilding of the city, and for majiy years was one of 
its largest landholders. He was born, October 10, 1773, in Cumberland 
County, New Jersey, a son of Peter Kinney, a soldier in the Revolution- 
ary war, and his wife, Margaret (Biggs) Kinney. 

Migrating with his parents from New Jersey to Pennsylvania, Aaron 
Kinney lived there for a number of years. In 1805, accompanied by 
his wife and four children, he came to Ohio, making the removal with 
a wagon drawn by four horses. Possessed of considerable means, he 
purchased from his brother-in-law, Washington Clingman, a tract of 
land from the Government, now included within the city limits, and 
from other parties bought a nearby tract upon which he built. Upon 
that tract was a spring of clear, sparkling water that has never yet failed, 
and in recent years has supplied the citizens with water in time of an 
emergency. AVhen he settled here all of this section was one vast wilder- 
ness, inhabited by wild animals of all kinds common to this section, 
deer being so plentiful that he killed two on his own land the first day 
of his arrival.. 

Mr. Kinney was a tanner by trade, and here established a tannery, 
sinking the vats in front of the present site of the Kinney home. Leather 
was a necessity among the settlers, and he carried on a flourishing busi- 
ness, people bringing hides which he tanned on shares. He disposed of 
his hides at Chillicothe, keeping a six-horse team to transport the leathrr, 
and to bring back the merchandise that he there purchased. As his 
wealth increased, Mr. Kinney wisely invested in more land, buying some 
from the Government, and people making abstracts of title found that 
he owned much of the land now included within the city limits. In 
1823 he l)0ught, paying $10.00 an acre, 178 acres, the tract extending 
from Union Street to the Scioto River, and from the south line of sec- 
tions 7 and 8 to Twelfth Street. In 1810 he erected a substantial brick 
houso, the first house made from that material in Scioto Countv, the 



974 HA^'G1NG ROCK IRON REGION 

bricks having been burned on his own land. Tlie house is finely located 
ou high land, connnanding an extensive view of the Ohio and Scioto 
valleys. It is now owned and occupied by his granddaughters, xMi-s. 
Janet (Kinney) Williams, and her sisters, Josephine and isabelle Kin- 
ney. Here the death of Mr. Kinney occurred on April 11, 1857. 

Mr. Kinney married, in 1797, Mary Clingman, who was bora in 
Pennsylvania, January 9, 1778. Iler father, John Michael Clingman, 
was born in Germany in 1746, and came to America in colonial times, 
settling in Pennsylvania. During the Revolutionary war he serveil as 
captain of a company. Late in life he came to Portsmouth, Ohio, to 
spend his last years with his children, at his death his body having l)een 
laid to rest in the Kinney Cemetery. The maiden naiue of the wife of 
Mr. Clingman was Ann Eliza Miller. Mrs. Mary (Clingman) Kinney 
died August 21, 1849. J^oth she and her husband were members of tlie 
Episcopal Church, and reared their family in the same faith. 

Twelve children were born to Mr. and ]\Irs. Kinney, namely : Wash- 
ington ; Elizabeth, who married Wilson Gates; Ann Eliza married David 
K. Cady ; Margaret became the wife of Charles C. Tracy ; Peter : Nancy 
married James Walker; Margaret married AVilliam Hall; Rachel mar- 
ried first John Dodson, and married second a ^Ir. Beekley : Elf; Ileiny ; 
Sarah A., who married John Rensliaw; and Philander C. j 

Coii. Petek Kinney. Noteworthy among the men prominent in 
the financial affairs of Scioto County a generation or more ago was the 
late Col. Peter Kinney, who was for many years engaged in banking in 
Portsmouth. A native of this city, he was born December 16, 180"). a 
son of Aaron and Mary (Clingman) Kinney, of whom a brief sketch 
may be found elsewhere in this biographical volume. 

Although Peter Kinney's school life was limited to a few months, 
he acquired a practical education, taking good advantage of eveiy 
opportunity offered for increasing his knowledge. Beginning wlien very 
young to make himself useful, he rendered his father great assistance, 
and when but fifteen years old was sent by his father with a flatboat 
load of produce to New Orleans, lie did well, and subseciuently made 
several trips to the same city, where, after disposing of his cargo he 
would sell his boat and return home on a steamboat. In eaily niriii- 
hood he formed a partnership with his brother-in-law. Wilson Ciatcs, 
and embarked in the grocery ])usiness as junior member of the firm of 
Gates & Kinney. In 1832 Mr. Kinney engaged in business as a private 
banker, and the same year, having obtained a grocer's license, opened 
a grocery on Front Street. The outbreak of the Civil war found him. 
like many others, busy with many projects; but his zeal and patriotism 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 975 

carried him into his country's service, and on September 11, 1861, he 
was commissioned colonel of the Fifty-Sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, 
and served in that capacity until April 8, 1863. Having command of 
the troops at Portsmouth during the Morgan raid, he declared martial 
law, antl every man who could carry a gun was forced to, while those who 
did not were compelled to work on the entrenchments. 

When the law regarding the organization of national banks was 
passed he organized the Portsmouth National Bank, and was made its 
first i)resident. Selling his interests in the institution in 1867, Colonel 
Kinney made a trip abroad, being one of the party written up by Mark 
Twain in his famous book "Innocents Abroad." On his return to Ports- 
mouth the Colonel organized the Bank of Portsmouth, which, in 1872, 
he changed to the Kinney National Bank, of which he became president. 

Active and influential in municipal affairs, Colonel Kinney served 
for upwards of thirty years as a meud)er of the city council, from 1852 
until 1854 being president of the board. In 1849 he had the honor of 
being delegated to welcome Zaehary Taylor to Portsmouth when he 
passed through the jilace on his way to Washington to be inaugurated as 
pi'esident of the United States. During the same year he was elected a 
scliool trustee. After his return from p]urope the Colonel built a fine 
residence in Kinney Lane, it being pleasantly located, and commanding 
a line view. lie named the place Mount Taber. This place is owned by 
his ilaughter, Mrs. Theodore' Funk, and here she now lives. There he 
subse(|uently resided until his death, August 13, 1877. 

Colonel Kinney married, in 1832, Elizabeth Reded, who was born 
in Penrith, England, and came to this country with her parents when 
but five years old, being seven weeks on the ocean. She survived him, 
passing away March 5, 1887. Colonel and Mrs. Kinney were the parents 
of two children, namely : John Wesley Kinney, of Chicago, Illinois ; 
and P^mma Dora, wife of Theodore K. Funk, of whom a brief sketch 
appeal's on another page of this work. Colonel Kinney was a member 
of the Episcopal Church, and he built a church at Third and Bond 
streets, known as Christ's Church. In politics he was a very strong 
republican. 

TiiKODORE K. Funk. Scholarly in his attainments, and possessing 
an extensive and comprehensive knowledge of law and of precedents, 
Theodore K. Funk, of Portsmouth, has a natural aptitude for his pro- 
fession, and holds high rank among the successful lawyers of Scioto 
County. A son of Jacob Funk, Jr., he was born, January 30, 1848, in 
Salem Township, Champaign County, Ohio. 

Joel Funk, Sr., his paternal grandfather, wa.s born in Pennsylvania, 



976 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

of early German ancestry. Going to Maryland in early manhood, he 
lived a few years in the vicinity of Frederick, from there coming to 
Ohio, and locating in Champaign County as a pioneer. Purchasing a 
tract of wild land in Salem Township, he at once began the arduous 
task of hewing a farm from the wilderness. Deer, turkeys and other 
wild game were then plentiful, and helped furnish the family larder. 
There were no railways for many years after his arrival, and no con- 
venient markets, and in order to dispose of the surplus products of his 
farm he had to take them in a crooked sill wagon drawn by four or six 
horses to Baltimore, where he exchanged his commodities for sugar, 
salt, and other needed supplies for the household. He cleared a good 
farm, and was there a resident until his death, in 1860, at the age of 
sixty-two years. He married Elizabeth Kenaga, who was born in Penn- 
sylvania, of German lineage. She survived him many years, living to 
welcome into this world a great-grandchild. She reared five children, 
as follows: Jacob; Aaron Benson; Emily, who married Jacob Myers; 
Caroline, wife of Peter Share; and Augusta, who died at the age of 
twenty-three years. 

Jacob Funk, Jr., was born in Salem Township, Champaign County, 
and was reared amid pioneer scenes, and educated in pioneer schools. 
He assisted his father in clearing a part of the old homestead, felling in 
piles huge oak aiid walnut trees that would now be very valuable, and 
burning them. When he was ready to begin life for himself his father 
gave him forty acres of land, and to this he added by purchase from 
time to time, and in course of years became an extensive and successful 
farmer. He attained the venerable age of eighty-two years. He mar- 
ried Sarah Long, who was born in Champaign County, Ohio, a daughter 
of James Long, a pioneer settler, coming from Scotch-Irish ancestry. 
She lived to the advanced age of eighty-seven years. Five children were 
born of their union, namely: Lee Wellington Funk, who for many 
years has been employed in the United States Treasury Department at 
Washington, D. C. ; Theodore K. Funk; Rovella Augusta Funk, living 
on the old homestead in Salem Township ; Eugene Funk, superintendent 
of the county infirmary at Valparaiso, Indiana; and James L. Funk, 
engaged in the grain business at West Liberty, Logan County, three 
miles from his old home. 

Theodore K. Funk received his rudimentary education in a small 
log schoolhouse, in which the slab seats had wooden pins for legs, and 
were so high that his feet could not touch the floor. He subsequently 
attended the Collegiate Institute in Urbana, and in 1866 entered the 
Ohio Wesleyan University, at Delaware, from the classical department 
of which he was graduated with the class of 1871. Beginning then the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 977 

study of law with Judge William Lawrence, of Bellefoutaine, Mr. Fuuk 
was admitted to practice in the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1873, and 
immediately opened an office in Portsmouth, where he has since been 
actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his chosen profes- 
sion. Making a specialty of criminal law, Mr. Funk has been the 
attornej' for the defendant in the more important cases of this part of 
the state, and the fact that in all the cases he has tried but one client 
has been executed is proof of his ability and success as a lawyer. 

Mr. Funk cast his first presidential vote for Gen. U. S. Grant, and 
has since been actively identified with the republican party. Being an 
eloquent and fluent speaker, he has been prominent in many political 
campaigns, having been his county's choice for Congress, and having 
been twice elected prosecuting attorney of the county. In 1892 he was 
chosen as presidential elector. Prior to a fire which destroyed his resi- 
dence a few years ago, he had one of the most extensive and valuable 
libraries in the state, and even now he has a verj^ complete library on 
criminal law, and a small but select librar}- containing the works of 
the best authors. 

On October 27, 1874, at St. Louis, Mr. Funk married Miss Emma 
Kinney, who was born in Portsmouth, Ohio, a daughter of Col. Peter 
and Elizabeth. (Reded) Kinney, of whom a brief account may be found 
on another page of this work. Six children have blessed the union of 
Mr. and Mrs. Funk, namely : Peter Kinney, Elizabeth Augusta, Sarah 
Imogene, Ada Bell, Laura Blaine, and James Wesley. Peter Kinney 
Funk, the oldest child, enlisted during the Spanish war in Company 
H, Fourth Regiment, Ohio Volunteers, and going with his command to 
Porto Rico served until the close of the conflict, being honorably dis- 
charged as first lieutenant of his company. Returning home, he resumed' 
work in the shoe factory which he had previously entered without any 
knowledge of the work required. Applying himself diligently, how- 
ever, he mastered the details of the trade, and was first promoted to 
the position of foreman, and is now superintendent of the Excelsior 
factory at Ironton. He married May Williams. Elizabeth A. Funk, 
the oldest daughter, married Charles 0. Lemen, general inspector in the 
Morgan-Wright Rubber Company's factory in Detroit, and has two chil- 
dren. Ada Bell Funk married James Porter, of Detroit, but now of 
Calumet, Michigan, with a manufacturing company and has one son, 
Donald Kinney Porter. Laura Blaine Funk married Harold Wendel- 
ken, a civil engineer, of Portsmouth. James W. Funk was graduated 
from the Portsmouth High School with the class of 1914, now in Detroit. 
Michigan, engaged in the coal business. Sarah Imogene, the third child 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Funk, died at the age of two years and four 



978 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

months. The beautiful home of Mr. and Mrs. Funk, located on the out- 
skirts of the town, is known as Mount Tabor, having been named by 
Col. Peter Kinney. Fraternally Mr. Funk is a member, and past 
exalted ruler, of Elks Lodge No. 154, Benevolent and Protective Order 
of Elks. 

Henry Richie Kinney. A life-long resident of Portsmouth, Scioto 
County, and for many years actively identified with its mercantile and 
horticultural interests, Henrj' Richie Kinney was born July 21, 1815, 
and died November 8, 1904, in the ninetieth year of his age. His parents, 
Aaron and Mary (Clingman) Kinney, were among the earlier settlers 
of Portsmouth, as is told in a brief sketch of their lives on another page 
of this volume. 

Obtaining tlie rudiments of his education in the pioneer schools of 
his native district, Henry Richie Kinney completed his studies at the 
Woodward High School, in Cincinnati. As a young man he assisted his 
father on the home farm, and made several trips on fiat boats to New 
Orleans, where he sold both produce and boats, making the return trip 
on a steamer. With the restless spirit characteristic of the true Ameri- 
can even in those early days, he started in early manhood on horseback 
for Chicago, Illinois, which was then on the frontier. Before reaching 
his point, of destination he met a man just returning from there who 
told him that Chicago was located in a swamp, and assured him that it 
would never become a city. Changing his plans, therefore, Mr. Kinney 
went to St. Louis, Missouri, where for two years he was employed in the 
hardware business. Returning then to Portsmouth, he was here simi- 
larly engaged until 1856, by earnest effort and good management build- 
ing up a substantial trade in hardware. From that time until 1870 he 
was not connected with any mercantile trade, but for a few years there- 
after he was again engaged in the hardware business, being in company 
with his sons. 

Upon the division of his father's estate, in 1856, the parental home- 
stead fell to his share, and for many years he was successfully engaged 
in the culture of fruit and vegetables. Mr. Kinney was strong and 
active, both physically and mentally to the end of his long life, and 
enjoyed himself to the fullest extent. His first recollections of Ports- 
mouth was as a wilderness, with a few houses scattered here and there. 
Conununication with the outside world was by way of the rivers, or 
overland with teams, until the completion of the canal. He witnessed 
wonderful changes in the face of the country, and lived to see Ports- 
mouth develop into a flourishing city, equipped with all modern con- 
veniences. 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 979 

Mr. Kinney married, November 7, 1843, Mary MacNairn. She was 
born at Newton Stewart, Wigtonshire, Scotland, May 11, 1824, a daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Jane (McKean) MacNairn. Her mother spent her 
entire life in Scotland, but her father, in 1839, immigrated to America, 
and after living for a while in Indiana came to Portsmouth, Ohio, where 
he was engaged in the liardware business until his death. Mrs. Kinney 
died August 30, 1886. Ten children were born of their union: Wel- 
lington, Harry Elwell, Janet, Josephine, Isabelle and five who died when 
young. 

Wellington Kinney, the oldest child, was for some years engaged in 
the hardware busines with his father. In 1905 he took up his residence 
in the State of Washington, where for a time he was engaged in the 
luml)er busines at Newport, but is now a real estate dealer in Spokane. 
He married Louise Epworth Briggs, and they have one son, Briggs 
Richie Kinnej', Harry Elwell Kinney began life for himself as a hard- 
ware merchant, being in company with his father and brother, and was 
afterwards engaged in the tan bark business until his death, at the early 
age of twenty-nine yeays. 

Janet Kinney was brought up and educated in Portsmouth. In 1875 
slie married Samuel T. Williams, who was born in Cleveland, Ohio, a 
son of William Williams, who was a native of Wales. On coming with 
his family to the United States William Williams lived first in Cleve- 
land, Ohio, and later in Sharon, Pennsylvania. His wife, whose maiden 
name was Mary Fair, was born in England. Samuel T. Williams found 
employment when quite young in the iron works, and while yet a resi- 
dent of Pennsylvania learned the details of the business. He came to 
Portsmouth in early manhood, and later became general manager of a 
steel mill located near Steubenville, and there lived until his death, in 
March, 1900, at the age of forty-seven years. After the death of her 
husband Mrs. Janet (Kinney) Williams returned to the parental home- 
stead in Portsmouth, where she and her sisters, Josephine Kinney and 
Isabelle Kinney, are living, being owners of the property. Mrs. Williams 
has one son, Howard Kinney Williams. He was educated in the high 
school of Portsmouth, and is now living in Steubenville, where he is 
superintendent of a steel mill. Mrs. Williams and her sisters are mem- 
bers, and active workers, of All Saints Church, while Mr. Williams was 
reared in the Presbyterian faith. Mrs. Williams and Miss Isabelle 
Kinney are members of the Joseph Spencer Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, and of the New Century Club. 

Frank McCurdy. A progressive and public-spirited citizen of 
his native county, Mr. ]\lcCurdy is engaged in business at Wheelers- 



980 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

burg as an undertaker and funeral director and is a member of a 
family whose name has been identified with the history of Scioto 
County for nearly half a century. 

Mr. McCurdy was born at Harrisonville, Scioto County, on the 
6th of April, 1870, and is a son of "William H. and Amanda (Wheeler) 
McCurdy, the former of whom was born in Pennsylvania and the 
latter in Scioto County, Ohio, a representative of a sterling pioneer 
family of this section of the state. William II. McCurdy was reared 
and educated in his native state, whence he came to Ohio when a 
young man, his marriage being solemnized in Scioto County. He be- 
came a successful road contractor and merchant and served three terms 
as a member of the board of county commissioners of Scioto County. 
He built many of the excellent turnpike roads in Scioto and adjoining 
counties, and he achieved success through his energy and well ordered 
industry. He died December 3, 1914, in the City of Wheelersburg, 
his devotfed wife having passed to the life eternal in 1901. He was a 
stalwart republican in his political proclivities and was affiliated with 
the Masonic fraternity. Of the five children four are living: William 
H. is a merchant at Wheelersburg; Harry E., maintaining his home 
at Portsmouth, is a traveling salesman for the C. P. Tracy Company; 
Frank is the immediate subject of this review; and Minnie is the 
widow of Dr. Claude B. Maddox, her home being in the City of Seattle, 
Washington. The other child, Ida, died at the age of four years. 

Frank McCurdy acquired his rudimentary education in the 
schools of Harrisonville, and was ten years of age at the time of the 
family removal to Wheelersburg, where he continued his studies in 
the graded schools until he had attained to the age of eighteen years. 
Thereafter he worked on his father's farm until he reached his legal 
majority, when he assumed the position of fireman in the service of 
the Norfolk & Western Railroad Company, in the employ of which he 
continued three years, the following three years being given to the 
supervision of the work of a railway construction gang in the South. 
Thereafter he was associated for three years with the work and man- 
agement of his father's farm, near Wheelersburg, and in December, 
1907, he established his present undertaking business, with appoint- 
ments and service of the best order. 

In politics, though never imbued with ambition for office, ]Mr. 
McCurdy is a staunch republican, and both he and his wife hold 
membership in the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is affiliated with 
Western Sun Lodge No. 91, Free and Accepted Masons, and with 
Wheelersburg Lodge No. 406, Knights of Pythias, of which he is past 



IIAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 981 

chancellor, also a cliarter inember of the Tribe of Ben Ilur, Wheelers- 
burg Court 230. 

In October, 1905, Mr. MeCurdy wedded JMiss Helen Frances Cadot, 
who was born and reared in Scioto County and who is a popular figure 
in the social activities of her home village. Mr. and Mrs. MeCurdy 
have no children. 

IIerm.vx O. Oktiimeyer. For more than sixty years a resident 
of the Hanging Rock Iron Region, Mr. Orthmeyer is a citizen whose 
name and a brief record of whose career should be permanently 
recorded in the history of this community. He represents a family 
which had its part in the early development of the Hanging Rock Iron 
Region, and since reaching manhood has been a progressive farmer 
and has made a reputation for integrity and success in all his relations 
with his fellow men. 

Herman 0. Orthmeyer ^Vas born in Elizabeth Township of Lawrence 
County, Ohio, February 29, 1848, a son of Frank and Catherine 
(Hacker) Orthmeyer. Both parents were born and reared in Ger- 
many, came to America and were married at Pine Grove Furnace 
in Southern Ohio, February, 1847. The father died Jn 1878 and the 
mother in 1894, and of their five children three are living: Herman; 
Frederick, who lives on the home farm ; and Frank, a farmer in Nortli 
Dakota and the owner of a section of land in that state. 

Herman Orthmeyer was reared in Lawrence County, attended the 
public schools of that section, and as a young man leai'ued the trade 
of wagon maker. He worked in Ironton until 1876, and since then, 
for another forty years, has devoted his energy and time to agricul- 
ture. Mr. Orthmeyer at one time owned 360 acres of land at Kelley 
Mills, but sold that and is now proprietor of tlie Clint Furst farm in 
Green Township of Scioto County, situated in the French Grant near 
Franklin Furnace. ]Mr. Orthmeyer has always been known in liis 
community as an indi;strious worker, a shrewd manager and has been 
tlioroughly progressive. 

In 1875 Mr. Orthmeyer married j\Iary L. XeMinan, who was born 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, but was educated in the public schools at Pine 
Grove Furnace. To their marriage have been born eight children, 
three sons and five daughters, mentioned briefly as follows : Catherine 
lives at home; Frank J., who is employed in the steam shovel works 
at Marion, Ohio ; Fred W., a barber, who lives in Cincinnati ; Joseph H., 
who is the owner of a bakery at Sciotoville; ^lary is in St. Francis 
Convent, Dubuque, Iowa ; Anna married August Craft, a farmer near 
Botkins, Shelby County, Ohio; Sophia is tlie wife of James ^Murpliy, 



982 IIAXOrXG ROCK IRON REGIOX 

of Marion, Ohio; and Plinma married Andy Boll and lives at Pine 
Grove Fnruaee, Ohio. The family are members of St. Peter's Catholic 
Church of Wheelersburg. Mr. Ortlimeyer is a republican. As a citi- 
zen he has alwaj's been willing to perform his share of the obligations 
that rest upon members of the community, and while working for his 
own welfare has not been negligent as to matters tliat concern society 
as a whole. 

Fred L. Prediger. Since bis retirement from the regular army a 
few years ago, ^Ir. Prediger has lived at Wheelersburg in Scioto County, 
and is spending his declining years in the same region where he was 
born. ^Ir. Prediger was in the regular United States army for about 
twenty-five years, and retired with the rank of sergeant of engineers. 

Fred L. Prediger was born at Portsmouth, Ohio, July 17, 1862, 
a son of Fred and Elizalieth (Le.s-ser) Prediger. His father was a 
native of Germany and his mother of Switzerland, they came to the 
United States separately and were married in Ohio, after which they 
located in Portsmouth. The father was a capable and expert boot and 
shoe maker, and manufactured goods in a time when the best boots 
and shoes were fustom made. He died in Portsmouth in 1868, while 
his widow passed away at Wheelersburg in May, 1913. Six of their 
eleven children are still living: William H., a shoe worker at Trenton, 
New Jersey; Cornelia, unmarried; Frances A., widow of Ferdinand 
Burke; Frederick L. ; Oliver L., a shoe worker at Portsmouth, Ohio; 
and Charles A., also a shoe worker. 

Frederick L. Prediger was reared to manhood at Portsmouth, 
attended the public schools, and wlien about fourteen years of age 
started out to make his own way. His first employment was in the 
old hub and spoke factory at Portsmouth. Subsequently he was em- 
ployed as a shoe worker and by these occupations supported himself 
until nineteen. He then went East and at the age of twenty joined 
the regular army. ]\Ir. Prediger served continuously in the army until 
his retirement in 1906. During the Spanish-American war he saw 
service in Cuba, and for six years was in the Philippine Islands. Since 
leaving the army he has lived in a comfortable rural home on Dogwood 
Ridge. On April 8, 1908, he married Cornelia Hunsinger, who was 
born and reared in Scioto County. In politics ]\Ir. Prediger is a 
repxiblican. 

Frederick Gexiieimer. For many years one of the most highly 
respected and substantial residents of Scioto County, owning a fine 
fai'm in Porter Township, Frederick Genheimer was a youth when the 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 98;i 

Civil war was fought and served several years in that great eonfliet 
between the states as a member of the Union army. Since its close 
he has been occupied with fj^rming and with the duties of good citizen- 
ship in Southern Ohio. 

Frederick Genheimer was born in Bavaria. Germany, September 
27, 1839, a son of Wendell and Sophia (Huffman) Geniieiiner. The 
family emigrated to the United States in 1845, locating at \"ernon 
Furnace in Lawrence County, Ohio^ where the father was employed 
as a furnace worker until 1865. In August of that year he bought 
a farm on Dogwood Ridge in Scioto County, and there spent the rest 
of his days. There were iowr children: Frederick, Elizabeth, Catherine 
and Frances, all of whom are deceased. 

Frederick Genheimer w^as past seven years of age when he arrived 
in this section of Ohio, and was educated in the English language in 
the schools of Lawa-ence County. He was brought up on a farm, anil 
I'eraained at home until twenty-one. In September. 1861, he volun- 
teered for service in the Union army in Company B of the Second 
West Virginia Cavalry, and was in the army under General Crook and 
afterwards under General Sheridan, and remained until the close of 
the war. AVith the close of hostilities he returned to Lawrence County, 
and afterw^ards moved to Dogw^ood Ridge, where he now resides. 

Mr. Genheimer was married in April 28. 1866, to INIrs. Sarah 
Cottle. She was born in Porter township of Scioto Count.v. They are 
the parents of five children : Tliomas, who graduated from the State 
University of Ohio and is superintendent of schools at Waco, Texas; 
Sophia A., who is unmarried and lives at home; Will F., a graduate 
of the Ohio State University and now a resident of Roanoke, West 
Virginia; Nora, living at home; and John, a graduate of the higli 
school at Wheelersburg, and still at home. 

Mr. Genheimer is conceded to have one of the finest farms on 
Dogwood Ridge. He has prospered in all departments of farming and 
has made a specialty of Jersey cattle. His farm comprises 123 acres, 
situated 2i/> miles southeast of Wheelersburg. Air. (ienheimer and fam- 
ily are members of the Free AVill Baptist Church. In politics he is a 
republican and served six years as one of the trustees of Porter Townsliip. 

Andrew J. Hyland. A native son of Scioto County who liolds 
distinct prestige as a successful farmer and merchant of tlie county, 
who maintains his residence in the A^'illage of Franklin Furnace, wlicre 
he is serving as postmaster, liesides conducting his well-appointed iji'ii- 
eral store. Air. Hyland is a popular and representative citizen wlio well 
merits recognition in tliis History of the Hanging Rock Iron Region 
of Ohio. 



984 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

^Ir. Ilyland was born on a farm in Green Township, Scioto County, 
on the 11th of April, 1864, and is a son of John and Mary (Doyle) 
Ilyland, both of whom were born in Ireland, members of staunch old 
families of the fair Emerald Isle. The parents were reared and edu- 
cated in their native land and within a short time after their marriage 
they immigrated to the United States. They established their home 
in the City of Cincinnati, Ohio, where they remained until their 
removal to Scioto County, in the pioneer days. John Hyland here 
purchased a tract of land near Franklin Furnace, and there devel- 
oped a productive farm, this old homestead continuing to be the abid- 
ing place of both him and his wife until their death, both having been 
devout communicants of St. Peter's Catholic Church, at Franklin Fur- 
nace, and Mr. Hyland having affiliated with the democratic party after 
gaining citizenship in his adopted country, ever afterward continuing 
a staunch supporter of its cause. Of the seven children, four are 
living: Catherine is the widow of William Glatz, and resides in the 
City of Portsmouth, judicial center of Scioto County ; ]\Iary is the wife 
of Peter Herbst, of Portsmouth; Ellen is the wife of William Woods, 
of the same city; and Andrew J. is the only surviving son. 

The old home farm was the stage on which Andrew J. Hyland 
played his role as a child and youth, and in connection with its work 
he gained his initial lessons in practical industry and responsibility, 
the while he profited fully by the opportunities afforded him by the 
public schools of Green Township. As a youth he learned the art of 
telegraphy, and in connection with his work as a telegraphist he 
finally was appointed station agent for the Norfolk & Western Railroad 
at Franklin Furnace, a position which he retained for the long period 
of fifteen years. Since his resignation he has been continuously identi- 
fied with the general merchandise business, and he has a substantial 
and appreciative trade in connection with his well-equipped store at 
Franklin Furnace, besides which he is the owner of a valuable farm of 
117 acres near his home village, seventy-seven acres of the tract being 
fertile bottom land, and the remaining forty acres being devoted to 
pasture, save for the portion that is still covered with native timber. 
jMr. Hyland 's success and independence stand as the result of his own 
ability and well-ordered efforts, and he is one of the progressive citi- 
zens of liis native county, where he has so guided and governed his life 
as to merit and receive the high esteem of all who know liim. 

In politics i\Ir. Hyland gives unequivocal allegiance to the repub- 
lican party, and not only has he held the office of postmaster at Frank- 
lin Furnace since 1898, but he has served also as a member of the 
school board of Green Township for twenty-two years. Both he and 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 985 

his wife are earnest conimunicauts of the Catholic Church, in which 
they are members of the parish of St. Peter's Church, at Wheelersburg. 
Oil the 2211 of September, 1892, was solemnized the marriage of 
jNIr. Ilyland to ]Miss Myrtie Eakins, who likewise was born and reared 
in Green Township, a member of one of the well known families of this 
part of Scioto County, where she received her education in the public 
schools. Mr. and Mrs. Hyland have four children: Orville R., who was 
bom on the 8th of July, 1893, was graduated in the high school of 
Green Township and in a commercial college at Portsmouth, and he is 
now associated in the management of his father's store; Stanley and 
Geraldine are students in the high school of Green Township; and Lewis 
L., who w-as born February 5, 1908, is attending the local graded school. 

IIenky a. SiiERMAX. Few of the farmers of the Hanging Rock 
Iron Region have made a better showing from a similar beginning than 
Henry A. Sherman of Wheelersburg, Porter Township, Scioto County. 
Mr. Sherman owns and occupies a fine farm of ninety-eight acres, 
lialf a mile northeast of Wheelersburg, and having begiin with prac- 
tically no capital at the time of his marriage, has acquired prosperity 
and a place of influence in the community. He has not only provided 
well for his family, but is regarded as one of the men of influence in 
his community. 

Henry A. Sherman was born at Vernon Furnace March 13, 1863, 
a son of Valentine and Elizabeth (Huffman) Sherman. Both parents 
were natives of Germany, and his father came to the United States 
at the age of thirteen and his mother at twelve, grew up in Ohio and 
nmrried in this state. Valentine Sherman w-as a fui-nace worker, and 
finally bought a farm on Dogwood Ridge, and engaged in farming until 
his death at Wheelersburg. There were ten children, and seven are 
living: John, of Scioto County; Sophia, wife of Herman Herms, of 
Portsmouth, Ohio: Elizabeth, wife of Augusta Zwickert; Henry; Ella, 
who lives at Wheelersburg and is unmarried; Dora, wife of June Adams 
of Wheelersburg. 

Henry A. Sherman grew up at Vernon Furnace and on Dogwood 
Ritlge, to whicli locality his father moved when he was three years 
of age. His education came from the public schools, and he has been 
acquainted with the duties of farm and field ever since boyhood. Mr. 
Sherman began farming for himself at the age of twenty-one. In 
1892 he married Sophia Smith, who was born at Dogwood Ridge. They 
luive two childTen: Edith, who married Stephen Hausgen and lives at 
Waits Station, Ohio; and Paul, born in 1901 and a student in the 
Wlieelersburg schools. ^\r. Sherman is a member of the Methodist 



986 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Episcopal Church at Wheelersburg, and was a charter member of the 
Kniglits of Pythias Lodge at that place. In polities he is a republican. 

CuALLis Haddon Dawson, M. D. A young physician and surgeon 
with the promise of a large career of usefulness, Dr. Challis Haddon 
Dawson began his work at Wheelersburg in Scioto County, and on 
June 1, 1915, moved to New Boston, Ohio. He has gained a large 
clientele, and enjoys an established position in the community. 

Challis Haddon Dawson was born February 25, 1892, at Scotland, 
Edgar County, Illinois, a son of Taylor and lona (Rodenbarger) Daw- 
son, both still residents of that place. Doctor Dawson acquired his educa- 
tion in the schools of Edgar County, finished the high school course 
in 1909, and then entered the medical department of the State Uni- 
versity of Ohio, from which he graduated M. D. in 1913. On August 
26, 1913, Doctor Dawson located for practice at Wheelersburg, and few 
graduates have done better within one year from leaving school than 
Doctor Dawson. He is a member of the medical societies, and is affiliated 
with the Phi Rho Sigma medical fraternity in the Omega Chapter at 
Columbus. He stood high in the fellowship of his college classes, was 
president of the high school class, and also president of his class in 
medical college. Doctor Dawson married Blanche Finney of Sciotoville, 
Ohio. She is the daughter of George Finney, and a relative of Captain 
A. J. Finney of Portsmouth, Ohio. Doctor Dawson was the youngest 
member of the graduating class in medical college, having celebrated 
his twenty-first birthday in February and graduating in the following 
May. He is also the youngest son of the family, and his wife is the 
youngest daughter. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Knights of 
Pythias at Wheelersburg, also with the IModern Woodmen of America, 
a member of Portsmouth Lodge of Elks No. 154 and a charter member 
of the order of Geeks, also of Portsmouth. In politics he is a democrat. 

Joshua Oakes Sons & Company. One of the large and important 
plants which give distinctive character to the industrial activities of 
the Hanging Rock Iron Region is the Joshua Oakes Sons & Company, 
manufacturers of drain tile and red brick at Oakland in Green Town- 
ship, Scioto County. The founder of the business, who recently died, 
had a long and industrious career in Scioto County, and belonged 1o 
one of the oldest families of this region. He has been succ(H'ded by his 
sons, who have continued the clay product indiistry established nearly 
forty years ago, and the business is now flourishing and one of more 
than local importance. Joshua Oakes was born January 11, 1826, at 
Haverhill, Ohio, in Green Township of Scioto County, and in his earlier 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 987 

days followed the Ohio River, working as a boatuian and boat manager 
along the Ohio. He was a man of versatile energy and had nmeli 
initiative and enterprise. An instance of this is the fact that lie 
bought the first circular saw mill used anywhere along the Ohio Valley, 
and set it up and did considerable business in manufacturing lumber 
for several years. Later he conducted the ferry at Haverhill, and 
finally sold that and bought a farm a mile and a half north of Haver- 
hill, situated in lots 8 and 9 of the French Grant. His purchase* of 
that land was in 1858. After farming for some years he and his sons 
established a tile and brick yard in 1877. That plant has been eularuod 
and brought to rank as a leading industry. 

Joshua Oakes'died January 12, 1914, and his wife passed away in 
1900. There were eight children, seven of whom are living: IMaiy, 
wife of Charles Austin; A. D. Oakes; Oscar F. Oakes; Ella, widow of 
Capt. Sam Mathewson ; Elona R., wife of Fillmore ]\hisser, cashier of 
the Ohio Valley Bank at Portsmouth ; Elmore, a farmer near McDer- 
mott, Ohio; Frank Oakes. The sons, A. D., Oscar F. and Frank, are 
now at the head of the brick and tile works. 

A. D. Oakes married Hannah Austin, and their eight children are 
all married and have established homes of their own, excepting Floyd 
L. Oakes, who was killed in an accident at Martinsville, Indiana, July 
7, 1915. Mr. Oakes is a member of the Woodmen of the World, belongs 
to the Grange, and he and his brothers are among the leading business 
men of Green Township. 

Robert S. Stewart, M. D. A capable physician and surgeon with 
a career of active practice covering the past seventeen years spent in 
the Hanging Rock Iron Region, and who is now located at South Web- 
ster in Scioto County, Doctor Stewart belongs to one of the older fami- 
lies in this section of Ohio and through his profession has made himself 
a factor of usefulness in the community. Doctor Stewart at the pres- 
ent time is serving as local surgeon at South Webster for the Baltimore 
& Ohio Railroad. 

Robert S. Stewart was born in Lawrence County, Ohio, January 4, 
1859, a son of Rufus C. and Hannah J. (Boggs) Stewart. His father 
was a native of the same county, was a farmer by occupation, and dur- 
ing the Civil war enlisted for service in the Sixth Ohio Cavalry, and 
gave up his life while in service as a sacrifice to the preservation of the 
Union. At his death his widow was left with six children, and five of 
them are still living. One son is Dr. David G. Stewart, a i)liysii-iriii 
and surgeon at Ironton, Ohio. 

Dr. Robert S. Stewart grew up on a farm, had limited advantages, 



988 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

and through his own energy and ambition prepared himself for his 
chosen work. He attended the public schools of Ironton, and in 1897 
graduated M. D. from the Kentucky School of Medicine and Hospital, 
and began his practice at Black Pork in Lawrence County. Doctor 
Stewart moved to South Webster in 1911, and has been favored with a 
large practice both in town and country. 

Doctor Stewart married Ida M. Hudson, daughter of Dr. David 
Hudson, a prominent old physician of AA^aterloo, Ohio. Doctor Stewart 
and wife have four children : Carrie, wife of D. S. Davis of Oak Hill, 
in the lumber business; Roxie, wife of Thomas "Williams, an engineer, 
livhig at Oak Hill; Nellie, unmarried and at home; and Emil H., mar- 
ried and living in South Webster. The family arer members of the 
^Methodist Episcopal Church, and Doctor Stewart is affiliated with 
Waterloo Lodge No. 532, Free and Accepted Masons, and in politics is 
a republican. 

John Harcha. As a lad of eight years the ex-postmaster of the 
Village of Buena Vista, Scioto County, accompanied his parents on 
their immigration from Germany to America, and he was rearea and 
educated in the village that is now his home and in which he has given 
t'xeellent account of himself in connection with business activities and 
civic- affairs, his popularity and his hold upon the confidence and good 
will of the community being indicated by his incumbency of the office 
of postmaster for about a quarter of a century, and is now deputy 
county clerk of Scioto County. Mr. Harcha is well known in Sciot'o 
County, is imbued with marked civic loyalty and progressivness and is 
well entitled to recognition in this history of the Hanging Rock Iron 
R<'gion of Ohio. 

John Harcha was born at Oberzelt kur Hessen, Germany, on the 
fith of October, 1872, and at the same place was born his father, John 
Henry Harcha, the date of whose nativity was October 11, 1846. The 
lalter's father was a substantial farmer in that section of the great 
empire of Germany and there passed his entire life, of the three chil- 
dren the only one to come to America being the father of the ex-post- 
master of Buena Vista. John II. Harcha attended the schools of his 
native land until he was in his fifteenth year, and he continued to bo 
ich'iitified with the improving and cultivating of land in Hessen until 
lie had attained the age of twenty-one years, when he found employment 
in Ihe great Krupp manufactory of firearms, with which celebrated 
institution he continued to be thus identified for four years. In 1882 
he came to the United States, being accompanied by his wife and their 
three children, and within a short time after his arrival in America he 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 989 

L'stablished his home at Buena Vista, where he was employed for a num- 
ber of years at the stone quarries that have contributed to the indus- 
trial prestig:e of Scioto County in a large degree. Through industry 
and good management he gained independence and definite prosperity, 
made judicious investments in real estate, and he now gives his atten- 
tion principally to the management of his various property interests, 
as one of the sterling and honored citizens of the county of his adoption. 
In the year 1872 he wedded ]\Iiss Anne Katie Dorn, who was a native 
of the same place in which he himself was born, the date of her birth 
having been August, 1846. She died on the 10th of September, 1904, 
having been a devoted wife and mother, and having been survived by 
four children — John, William Frederick, Henry and Elizabeth. She 
was a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1906 John H. Harcha 
contracted a second marriage, being united in wedlock to Mrs. Anne 
Katie' (Scheflfer) Loss, widow of Henry^ Loss, of Scioto County. 

John Harcha, the immediate subject of this sketch, acquired his 
rudimentary education in his native land and was eight years of age 
at the time of the family immigration to the United States. His alert 
mind enabled him to profit duly by the advantages that were afforded 
him in the public schools of Buena Vista and the memories of his 
fatherland soon became obscured through contemporary influences and 
conditions, so that he is essentially and loyally American in all that 
pertains to appreciation and loyal citizenship. As a youth he entered 
the employ of the Buena Vista Freestone Company, in the capacity 
of sawyer, and he remained with this corporation imtil its affairs were 
placed in the hands of a receiver. Thereafter he became associated 
with others in the organization and incorporation of the Buena Vista 
Stone Company, which purchased the plant of the company previously 
mentioned and which operated the same for two years thereafter. 

In 1898, under the administration of President McKinley, Mr. 
Harcha was appointed postmaster at Buena Vista, and of this position 
he continued the efficient and popular incumbent until 1915, when he 
accepted the deputy clerkship of Scioto County under Clerk J. W. 
Hall. His administration of the affairs of the offices have been circum- 
spect and systematic and have given satisfaction to the community. 
He is a stalwart republican in politics, is progressive and public-spirited 
as a citizen and takes a loyal interest in all that concerns the general 
welfare of his home village, where he has served for the past eight years 
as a member of the school board, of which he is clerk at the time of this 
writing. Mr. Harcha and his wife are members of the Presbyterian 
Church, and he is affiliated with Rome Lodge No. 535, Free and Ac- 
cepted Masons; Buena Vista Lodge No. 842, Independent Order of Odd 



990 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

Pillows, and with Peerless Lodge of the Loyal Order of ^loose, in the 
City of Portsmouth. 

On the 25th of March, 1894, was recorded the marriage of .Mr. 
Ilarcha to Miss Elizalaeth Roth, who was born in Nile Townshij), Seioto 
County, where she was reared and educated. She is a daughter of 
Conrad and Elizabeth (Knauff) Roth, the former of whom was born 
in Oberzelt kur Hessen, Germany, and the latter in Butler County, 
Pennsylvania. Conrad Roth was born January 19, 1835, his parents 
having passed their entire lives in that section of the German empire 
in which he was born and reared and where he continued to be iden- 
tified with agricultural pursuits until his immigration to the United 
►States, at the age of twenty years. He landed in the City of New 
Orleans, and from the Crescent City he soon made his way to Adams 
County, Ohio, where he found employment at. farm work, later in tlie 
stone quarries and finally as a carpenter. He devoted his attention 
to the carpenter's trade until 1882, when he purchased a farm three 
miles east of Buena Vista, where he continued to reside until his death, 
in 1889. His wife was born on a farm about ten miles distant from 
the judicial center of Butler County, Pennsylvania, on the 22d of Feb- 
ruary, 1842. Her father, Michael Knauff, was born in Germany and 
was twelve years old at the time of the family immigration to America. 
His father, Nicholas Knauff, purchased land in Butler County, Penn- 
sylvania, and was there identified with farming until his death. 
Michael Knauff continued his residence in Butler County until 1853, 
when he came to Ohio and purchased a farm in Green Township, Adams 
County, where he finally died at the venerable age of eighty-four years. 
His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Gardner, having been born in 
Germany and having been young when she came with her parents to 
the United States. She attained to the age of seventy-one years, her 
mother having reached the remarkable age of ninety-four years. Con- 
rad and Elizabeth (Knauff) Roth became the parents of eleven children, 
namely : Margaret, ]\Iichael, Mary, Elizabeth, Henry, Lucy. Anna, 
Conrad, Frederick, Amelia and Louis. Mr. and ]\Irs. Harcha have a 
pleasant home at Buena Vista, and the same is known for its generous 
hospitality and good cheer. They have two sons, Howard Henry and 
John Roth, the former of whom is a member of the class of 1916 in tlio 
higli school at Portsmouth, and the latter of whom is attending the vil- 
lage schools of Buena Vista. 

Samuel G. H.vrper. For a great many years the Harper family 
have been identified with the professional life of Scioto County. The 
father of Samuel G. Harper was Judge John J. Harper, one of the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 991 

most distinguished members of the Scioto County bar for many years. 
Samuel G. Harper is a civil engineer by profession, has done mucli 
important work in that line, and his son was recently elected county 
surveyor of Scioto County. 

Samuel (J. Harper was bom in Portsmouth, October 27, 1864. His 
father, Judge John James Harper, was born on a farm near Amanda 
in Fairfield County, Ohio, July 6, 1834. The grandfather was Alex- 
ander Harper, a native of Berkeley County, Virginia, who came out to 
Ohio and was one of -the early settlers in Fairfield County, where he 
developed a farm and lived a number of years. While in Fairfield 
County he served as a justice of the peace. From Ohio he moved to 
Peoria County, Illinois, and lived there until his death in 1858. Alex- 
ander Harper married Jane Cunningham, who died in 1881. 

The late Judge John J. Harper grew up in Fairfield County, ac- 
quired his education in the common schools, taught school both in 
Fairfield and in Pickaway counties, and in 1853 began an interesting 
venture which eventually brought him to Portsmouth and into profes- 
sional life. In that year, in partnership with Horace Ellis, he bought 
a photograph outfit, consisting of the implements of the trade and a 
wagon fitted up for the purpose, in which they traveled from one place 
to another, remaining long enough to serve the people with their art 
and then going to another town. That was a time when photography 
was confined to the old-fashioned daguerreotype and ambrotype pic- 
tures, many of which are still found in family albums. Arriving at 
Portsmouth, Judge Harper bought his partner's interest in the concern, 
and for several years conducted the business alone. In 1858 he began 
the study of law with Mr. Hutchins, and was admitted to the bar 
April 25, 1860. Then followed a number of years of practice as a 
lawyer which brought him well earned and honorable distinction. He 
was associated with a number of well known lawyers, one time being a 
partner of Col. Henrv E. Jones, later of F. C. Searle, and also with 
Hon. John K. Richards. In 1886 Judge Harper removed to Washing- 
ton Court House. Ohio, and lived there until his death. 

Judge Harper was prominent in public affairs. In 1863 he was 
elected prosecuting attorney of Scioto County, and re-elected in 1865. 
In 1868 his name was placed on the republican ticket as presidential 
elector. In 1871 he was elected to the Common Pleas bench, was re- 
elected in 1876, and gave a capable administration of that judicial office 
until 1882. Judge Harper was twice married. His first wife, the 
mother of Samuel G., was Emily Jones, who was born in Portsmouth 
and died in 1874, and her four children were John E., William A., Sam- 
uel G. and Joseph II. 



992 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

111 the Evans History of Scioto County appears the following pen 
portrait of the late Judge Harper: "In personal appearance he is 
tall, erect, above the average height, of fine, manly and gentlemanly 
appearance. He always wears a silk hat and is most fastidious in his 
dress and personal appearance. His linen is always immaculate, and 
his clothing of the best and most fashionable. He was always the best 
dressed lawyer at the Portsmouth bar. While he was in politics he 
always had the support of his county for Congress, and might have 
been in Congress had he had the ability to make political deals. That 
lie scorned, and hence he missed the honor of representing his district 
in the national legislature. He enjoyed the respect of the members of 
his profession throughout the state for his legal attainments." 

Samuel G. Harper grew up in Portsmouth, attended the public 
schools, and in 1883 became assistant to the city engineer. This was 
the service which introduced him to his chosen field of work. Later he 
was clerk in different offices in the courthouse for a few years, served 
two terms as county surveyor, two years as city engineer, and since then 
has been in active practice as a surveyor and civil and construction 
engineer. At the present time his services are engaged by the City of 
New Boston in supervising the construction of the water system, the 
sewerage and street paving. 

Samuel G. Harper married, in 1889, ]\lary Dotson, daughter of 
Daniel and Clarissa (Diffenbaugh) Dotson, both natives of Ohio and of 
German stock. The seven children of I\Ir. and ]\Irs. Harper are : John 
J., Sadie M., Samuel G., Jr., Emma J., Joseph H., jMarie W. and 
Mary D. The son John, after leaving the public schools, studied sur- 
veying with his father, for three years was employed in the engineering 
department of the Norfolk & Western Railway, was assistant city engi- 
neer two years, and on November 3 was elected to the office of county 
surveyor. He is the youngest county surveyor in the State of Ohio. 
Mr. Samuel G. Harper is affiliated with Massie Lodge No. 115, Knights 
of Pythias, and with Peerless Lodge No. 762, Loyal Order of Moose. 

W. Albert Wurster. In business circles at Portsmouth, W. Albert 
Wurster has enjoyed the relations of the successful man and public- 
spirited citizen for many years. Formerly engaged in the bakery busi- 
ness, he has for the past fifteen years been identified with the Tracy 
Shoe Company and is now secretarj' of that well known local enter- 
prise. 

W. Albert Wurster is a native of the City of Portsmouth, born 
February 3, 1867. His father, the late John George Wurster, was a 
sterling German-American citizen, a native of Dettingen, Wuertem- 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 993 

berg, Germany. Grandfather AViirster was a manufacturer of linseed 
oil in Wuertemberg, spent all his life there, and had a mill which was 
operated by water power. He was twice married, and John George 
was the only child of his first wife. By his second marriage he reared 
seven sons, all of whom so far as known remained in their native land. 
John George Wurster as a boy attended school steadily, and subse- 
quently became assistant to his father in the management of the linseed 
oil mill. It was his ambition to make a fortune in the New World, 
and at the age of nineteen he accomplished that journey which brought 
him to the land of his desires, landing in New York a stranger among 
strange people, and without capital except good health and willing 
hands. After a short period of employment in New York City, he 
joined some relatives in Waverly, Ohio, and later came to Portsmouth. 
He was a hard-working, industrious and thrifty young German, and 
at Portsmouth was employed a few years in the Gaylord Rolling jMills 
and then on the death of his brother-in-law, Fred Kraft, succeeded to 
his baking business. John G. Wurster conducted that shop and estab- 
lished a high reputation for the quality of his products until his death 
in 1886. John G. Wurster married Mary- Dorothy Kiedaisch. She was 
born also in Wuertemberg, Germany, a daughter of J. Frederick Kie- 
daisch, who brought his family from Germany, and after a short resi- 
dence at Waverly, Ohio, moved to Portsmouth and lived there until his 
death. Mrs. John G. Wurster died in 1876. She reared four sons and 
one daughter. The daughter, Mary, is the wife of Daniel Egbert, pres- 
ent county commissioner. The sons are John, J. Fred, William Albert 
and J. George. 

William Albert Wurster acquired his early education in the public 
schools of Portsmouth, and early began yarning his own way. His first 
regular work was in assisting his father in the bakery, and after his 
father's death he conducted the business successfully until 1899. In 
that year he became connected with the Tracy Shoe Company as book- 
keeper, in 1906 acquired an interest in the concern, and at the present 
time is secretary, and one of the men who have done mucli to increase 
the business to its present flourishing proportions. 

Mr. Wurster Avas married in 1888 to Elizabeth M. Miller, who was 
born in Portsmouth, daughter of John T. and Elizabeth (Smith) Miller. 
Mr. and ]\Irs. Wurster are members of the German Evangelical Church, 
and he is aifiliated with the Royal Arcanum. 

John P. Addis. The efficient and honored superintendent of the 
Scioto County Infirmary, in Washington Township, has been promi- 
nently identified with various lines of enterprise in this county, where 



994 IIAXGIXG ROCK IRON REGION 

he is the owner of a finely improved farm and other valuable realty, 
and where he commands secure vantage-place in popular confidence 
and esteem, as is evidenced by his being called to the exacting office of 
which he is now the incumbent and in which he is giving a most effective 
and satisfactory administration. 

Mr. Addis was born in Sims Township, Lawrence County, Ohio, and 
is a son of Thomas and Joan (Phillips) Addis. Thomas Addis was 
born in Adams County, this state, in 1840, and is a son of Rev. Freeman 
Addis, who likewise was born in Adams County, a member of a sterling 
pioneer family of that county. Rev. Freeman Addis became a clergy- 
man of the Baptist Church and labored with much of consecration and 
zeal in the uplifting of his fellow men. He finally removed from his 
native county to Lawrence County, where he purchased and established 
his home on a farm, in Sims Township. While giving his personal 
supervision to his farm he continued his earnest services as a minister 
and he held tlie reverent affection of those who came within the sphere 
of his benignant influence during the course of his long and useful life. 
He was well advanced in years at the time of his death, and he and his 
noble wife reared a family of eight children— Isaac, Thomas, Barbara, 
Benjamin, Barton, ]\Iary, Lewis and Margaret. At the inception of the 
Civil war three of the sons, Isaac, Thomas and Benjamin, enlisted in 
defense of the Union, and all continued in active service until the close 
of the great conflict through which the integrity of the nation was per- 
petuated. Barton, the fourth son, likewise enlisted in 1861, and he sac- 
rificed his life on the field of battle. Lewis, the youngest of the soiis, 
was too young for enlistment until the final year of *the war, when he 
entered the ranks and made an admirable record as a youthtui patriot. 
The father was beyond the age limit for military service, but he zeal- 
ously applied himself in recruiting soldiers and caring for the families 
of those who had gone to the front, as well as widows and orphans of 
soldiers who had fallen in battle. He amplified his patriotic service 
by serving as a trainmaster in the moving of Union forces during the 
last part of the war. During his entire adult life this sturdy clergy- 
man and patriot was unflagging in his support of the principles of the 
democratic party, and from this political faith his sons and other 
descendants have not departed. 

Thomas Addis was about ten years of age at the time of the family 
removal to Lawrence County, where he was reared to manhood under the 
discipline of the home farm and attended the pioneer schools, besides hav- 
ing the benignant influences of a home of marked culture and refinement. 
He was about twenty-one years old when the Civil war was precipitated 
on the nation and he promptly tendered his services in defense of the 



HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 995 

Union. Crossing the Ohio River, he enlisted as a private in the Second 
Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, and with this command he saw active 
and arduous service during the earlier part of the war. After receiv- 
ing his honorable discharge he returned to Ohio and within a short 
time thereafter he re-enlisted, as a veteran. At this time he became a 
member of the One Hundred and Seventy-third Ohio Volunteer Infan- 
try, in the command of General Thomas, and he continued in active 
service for some time after the final surrender of Generals Lee and 
Johnston. Upon receiving his honorable discharge for a second time, 
he returned to his home in Lawrence County, with a record of faithful 
and gallant service as a soldier of the republic and as one who had 
taken part in many important engagements. 

Turning his attention once more to the pursuits of peace, Thomas 
Addis purchased a farm in Sims Township, Lawrence County, and in 
addition to giving effective supervision to the cultivation and improve- 
ment of his farm he developed also a prosperous enterprise in the burn- 
ing of charcoal, which he sold and delivered to various iron furnaces in 
the vicinity. In 1890 Mr. Addis sold his farm and removed to Scioto 
County, where he purchased a good farm, in IMadison Township. On 
this homestead he remained until 1913, when he sold the property, and 
he now resides in the home of one of his daughters, at Waterloo, Law- 
rence County, having "retired after long years of earnest and fruitful 
endeavor. His wife was born in Aid Township, Lawrence County, and 
was a daughter of Henry and Rebecca Phillips. She was summoned 
to eternal rest in 1894, at the age of fifty-five years, and is survived by 
six children — John P., Barton, Minnie, Hattie, George and Bertha. 

To the district schools of his native township, in Lawrence County, 
George P. Addis is indebted for his early education, and when a lad of 
but twelve years he became a productive worker, as a driver of one of 
his father's teams and as an assistant in various departments of the 
farm work. He remained at the parental home until he had attained 
to his legal majority and then made a trip to the South, but he was 
not sufficiently impressed with the advantages and attractions of that 
section of the country to make there a definite location. Upon his re- 
turn to Ohio he engaged in farming and the cutting of timber in 
Jefferson and Madison townships, Scioto County, and a few years later 
he turned his attention to contracting in the construction of public 
highways. While thus engaged he purchased a farm in Harrison 
Township, as well as village property at Harrisonville, where he estab- 
lished himself in the general merchandise business, to which he con- 
tinued to give his. supervision until May, 1914, when he was appointed 

Vol. 11—23 



996 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

superintendent of the county infirmary, the office of which he is now the 
incumbent. 

Mr. Addis cast his tirst presidential vote in support of Grover 
Cleveland and he has since continued a stalwart advocate and upholder 
of the cause of the democratic party, in the local affairs of which he has 
been prominent and influential. He is at the present time a member 
of the Democratic County Committee of Scioto County and also of the 
party's executive committee in this county. While a resident of Jeffer- 
son Township jMr. Addis served as assessor, constable and land appraiser, 
and in Harrison Township he was called in turn to the offices of assessor, 
land appraiser and justice of the peace, besides having served fifteen 
years as a member of the election board of the township. He is a 
charter member of the lodge of Knights of Pythias at Harrisonville, 
where he is also affiliated with the camp of the Sons of Veterans, his 
father being a valued and appreciative member of the Grand Army of 
the' Republic, and he holds membership also in the Modern Woodmen of 
America and the Junior Order of United American Mechanics. Mrs. 
Addis is a zealous member of the Baptist Church and has been a popu- 
lar figure in church and social circles. 

In the year 1886 was solemnized the marriage of Mr. Addis to Miss 
Julia Delaney, who was born at Scioto Furnace, a daughter of John and 
Mary (Wolfe) Delaney, both natives of Pennsylvania. From the old 
Keystone State Mr. Delaney came to Scioto County, Ohio, where he 
remained for several years, and after the death of his wife he returned 
to Pennsylvania, which continued to be the place of his residence until 
his death. Mr. and Mrs. Addis have eight children, namely: Bertha, 
Minnie, Lillie, Edward, William, Thomas, Emma and Floyd B. 

Albert Turner. Few counties of the old Buckeye State can vie 
wdth Scioto County in general attractiveness and opulent natural re- 
sources, and of the many fine farmsteads which make this county a 
veritable garden, one of the excellent and admirably improved landed 
estates is that owned by Albert Turner, the same comprising 300 acres 
of specially fertile land, situated in the beautiful Ohio Valley about 
eight miles to the south of the City of Portsmouth, the judicial center 
and thriving metropolis of the county. Mr. Turner is a native of 
Scioto County and a representative of one of its honored pioneer fami- 
lies, the name which he bears having been prominently identified with 
the civic and industrial development and progress of this favored sec- 
tion of the state and he himself holding prestige as one of the repre- 
sentative agriculturists and stock-growers of the county, and as a citizen 
of marked liberality and public spirit. 



HANGING KOCK IRON REGION 997 

Mr. Turner was born at the old homestead, near Union ]\Iills, Wash- 
ington Township, this county, on the 12th of November, 1863, and is a 
son of William and Mary (Daniels) Turner, who reared six children, 
of whom he was the third in order of birth, the names of the other chil- 
dren being Frank, Louisa, Andrew, Barry and Jennie D. Louisa is 
the wife of Andrew Briggs, and Jennie D. married Christian Blair. 
William Turner was born in Washington Township, Scioto County, 
on the 20th of March, 1832, and was a son of Samuel and Phoebe (Wil- 
son) Turner, the latter having been a native of Virginia and a repre- 
sentative of the well known family of that name in the Old Dominion 
State. Samuel Turner was one of the earliest settlers of Washington 
Township, Scioto County, where he reclaimed a farm from the wilder- 
ness, became influential in public affairs of a local order and where he 
continued to reside until his death, as did also his wife. They became 
the parents of four children — John, William, Mary and Maria. 

AVilliam Turner was reared under the conditions and influences of 
the pioneer farm and eventually became one of the most successful and 
influential agriculturists of his native county. He accumulated a val- 
uable landed estate of 500 acres, gave his influence and co-operation in 
the furtherance of enterprises projected for the general good of the 
county and its people, and so ordered his course as to merit and receive 
the unqualifled confidence and esteem of his fellow men. He espoused 
the cause of the republican party at the time of its organization, ever 
afterward continuing a staunch supporter of the same. He was influ- 
ential in public affairs in Scioto County, where he served a number of 
years as township trustee and for six years as county commissioner. 
In the Evans history of this section of the state William Turner is 
referred to as having been "one of the most reliable citizens of Scioto 
county." He died at the age of about seventy-nine years, having con- 
tracted a second marriage when well advanced in years, his first wife, 
mother of the subject of this review, having been about fifty-eight years 
old when she was summoned to eternal rest. 

Albert Turner was reared to the sturdy discipline of the home 
farm and there learned the dignity and value of honest toil and en- 
deavor, the while he made good use of the advantages afi^orded him in 
the rural schools of the vicinity. At the time of his marriage he estab- 
lished his residence on his present homestead farm, which has the best 
of "permanent improvements, including a house with metropolitan 
equipment and facilities, and wider his able management the farm is 
maintained under effective cultivation, with excellent yields of the 
various products best suited to the soil and climate, besides which he 
raises on the place excellent grades of live stock and is known as one 



998 HANGING ROCK IRON REGION 

of the alert and progressive farmers of the county which has been his 
home from the time of his birth. He is an exponent of high civic ideals, 
is a stalwart republican in politics, is affiliated with the Independent 
Order of Odd Fellows, and his sterling attributes of character com- 
mand to him the high regard of all who know him. Concerning Mr. 
Turner a previous publication has spoken in the following words: 
"While he is essentially a man of business, he is a lover of sports, and 
in time of leisure takes delight in hunting and in an occasional fox 
chase." 

On the 11th of March, 1890, was solemnized the marriage of Mr. 
Turner to Miss Catherine Barbee, a daughter of William A. and Mary 
(Gable) Barbee, both natives of Portsmouth, Scioto County, where 
their marriage was solemnized in the year 1869. William A. Barbee 
was born December 23, 1847, and is a son of Elias and Mary (Hyatt) 
Barbee, the latter of whom was a daughter of Elvin Hyatt. Elias Bar- 
bee was born at Dayton, Ohio, and was a son of William A. and Frances 
(Curtis) Barbee, honored pioneers of Ohio, to which state it is sup- 
posed that William A. Barbee came from Virginia; he passed the clos- 
ing years of his life in the vicinity of Dayton and his widow was a resi- 
dent of Portsmouth at the time of her death. Elias Barbee came to 
Portsmouth from Dayton at the age of eighteen years, making the jour- 
ney by way of Cincinnati and traversing the entire distance on foot. 
He learned the carpenter's trade, to which he devoted his attention, at 
Portsmouth, for a few years, after which he was engaged in farming 
in Scioto County until his death, he and his wife having reared five 
children. William A. Barbee, father of ]\lrs. Turner, attended the 
schools of Portsmouth in his youth and in 1863, when in his seven- 
teenth year, he tendered his services in defense of the Union. He en- 
listed in Company E, One Hundred and Fortieth Ohio Volunteer In- 
fantry, with which he proceeded to West Virginia and with which he 
continued in service until after the expiration of 100 days' term of 
enlistment. After receiving his honorable discharge he returned to his 
home and during the remainder of his active career he was engaged 
in farming in Scioto County, where he achieved marked success and 
where he is stil